CollectionsPharmacist
IN THE NEWS

Pharmacist

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 17, 1997 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Abe Hailperin, 86, a retired pharmacist who operated Conroy Drugs in Moorestown for 34 years, died Saturday at West Jersey Hospital-Marlton. Mr. Hailperin had lived in Moorestown for 45 years. He was born and raised in Newark. A pharmacist for 54 years, Mr. Hailperin operated Conroy Drugs before retiring in 1986. The Moorestown landmark had been in existence for more than a half century before its closing. For Mr. Hailperin, the local pharmacy was a family business - with his wife and children working in the store - and a calling.
NEWS
May 8, 1999 | By Gregory J. Sullivan
'Conscience," explains the Catechism of the Catholic Church, "is a judgment of reason whereby the human person recognizes the moral quality of a concrete act that he is going to perform, is in the process of performing, or has already completed. " And it adds: "In all he says and does, man is obliged to follow faithfully what he knows to be just and right. " A law that strongly protects a person's obligation of conscience, particularly in the area of his professional work, is admirable.
NEWS
August 26, 1999 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hyman "Doc" Solomon, 91, an old-fashioned pharmacist who during a nearly 60-year career made elixirs, compounds and capsules of medicine when not serving ice cream sodas, died of heart failure Monday at Albert Einstein Medical Center. He lived in Rhawnhurst. Mr. Solomon earned his nickname, like many other early druggists, because he was certified by the state to formulate his own over-the-counter prescriptions. "If you had a cough or anemia, he would make an elixir for you," son-in-law Martin Ellick said.
NEWS
January 3, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Maurita Robinson Brown, 85, formerly of Ridley Park, a retired pharmacist and a trailblazer, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Saturday at the Attleboro Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Langhorne. In 1943, Mrs. Brown became the first African American woman to graduate from Temple University's School of Pharmacy, after completing her studies in three years. When Temple honored her at her class' 50th reunion, she told a reporter: "I felt right away that there were some on the faculty that wanted me to drop out, and I had to reach inside and find the courage to continue.
NEWS
July 20, 2005 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A drug-addicted pharmacist has admitted stealing more than $150,000 in prescription drugs from a Bucks County hospital where he worked, authorities said yesterday. Brian S. Young, 42, of Gilbertsville, Montgomery County, was fired after his arrest Monday outside Grand View Hospital in Sellersville. At the time, he carried 200 pills he had just stolen from the hospital pharmacy, District Attorney Diane E. Gibbons said. Under questioning, Young said he had swiped more than 30,000 OxyContin pills since 2003, court records say. Young told investigators he had been addicted for several years, and had stolen unknown quantities of other drugs over the past five years.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | By Tom Sheridan, Special to The Inquirer
The April arrest of an illegal dealer in prescription drugs led to an undercover operation that netted a Bristol Borough pharmacist on drug charges this week. Bucks County District Attorney Alan M. Rubenstein said that the "dealer agreed to go undercover" after his arrest and that, on behalf of authorities, he bought large doses of Tylenol with codeine, percocet and placidyl on seven occasions over the last three months from James Rocco, 42, of Bristol Borough. Rocco, who operates Rocco's Pharmacy on Farragut Avenue in Bristol - where authorities said the drug buys took place, was arrested Monday and charged with dispensing to a drug-dependent person, unlawful dispensing of drugs by a practitioner, altering prescriptions and violations of the drug labeling act. After the arrest, Rocco was released on his own recognizance and his bail was set at $250,000.
NEWS
October 27, 1995 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bernard Friedman, 80, founder of the Barclay Prescription Pharmacy at 18th and Spruce Streets in Rittenhouse Square, died Wednesday at Pennsylvania Hospital. Mr. Friedman, who was born in Philadelphia and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania and the Temple University School of Pharmacy, opened the Barclay in 1941. In the '40s, the composer Leonard Bernstein, architect Louis Kahn and other luminaries would gather at the pharmacy's soda fountain, Mr. Friedman's son, Russell, said.
NEWS
March 18, 2008 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philip Grolnick, 100, a retired pharmacist and drugstore owner, died Friday at his home in Cherry Hill. In the late 1940s, Mr. Grolnick and his younger brother, Abe, opened Grolnick Drugs at Broad and Susquehanna Streets in North Philadelphia. In 1958, they moved their business to Woodbury Heights and operated Southwood Drugs until 1977. After it was sold, Mr. Grolnick continued to work at the store until he retired at 87. The Grolnick brothers had kept "profile cards" on their customers and noted when a patient had a bad reaction to a drug, years before New Jersey began requiring pharmacists to do this.
NEWS
September 6, 1986 | By JIM SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
Stanley Rosenthal, who owned a pharmacy in Frankford for several months, yesterday was sentenced to up to two years in prison by a federal judge for selling more than $50,000 worth of drugs to neighborhood junkies. Rosenthal, 47, of Huntingdon Valley, Montgomery County, also was fined $75,000 by U.S. District Judge James T. Giles. Rosenthal bought the Tremont Pharmacy, 4201 Frankford Ave., on Aug. 20, 1984. The store was closed several months later by agents of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration because of the illegal drug sales.
NEWS
June 20, 1990 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Victor M. "Doc" Quinones, a retired pharmacist and Postal Service clerk who helped neighborhood youngsters get a start in life, died Monday. He was 91 and lived in West Philadelphia. Doc operated his drugstore in the 4100 block of Lancaster Avenue until 1971 with his wife of 48 years, the former Catherine Harris. She died in 1977. They had no children. He also worked during those years as a mail clerk, retiring at age 72. Quinones was born and raised in Puerto Rico, where his mother washed clothes for others to help send her son to school.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 5, 2016 | By Albert I. Wertheimer and Patricia J. Bush, For The Inquirer
Albert I. Wertheimer, Ph.D., professor of pharmacy administration at Temple University School of Pharmacy, and Patricia J. Bush, Ph.D., professor emeritus at Georgetown University School of Medicine, are co-authors of "Your Drugs & Sex: How Prescription & Non-Prescription Drugs Can Affect Your Sex Life. " Q. What's going on with drug prices? A.The EpiPen headlines are only the latest in a trail of awkward situations for medicine makers who are aggressive about very large price increases.
NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Albert I. Wertheimer and Patricia J. Bush, For The Inquirer
Albert I. Wertheimer, Ph.D., professor of pharmacy administration at Temple University School of Pharmacy, and Patricia J. Bush, Ph.D., professor emeritus at Georgetown University School of Medicine, are co-authors of "Your Drugs & Sex: How Prescription and Non-Prescription Drugs Can Affect Your Sex Life. " Q. Are generics the same as brand-name drugs? A. Yes - and no. Years ago, after being prescribed a brand-name hydrocortisone ointment to treat poison ivy, one of us (Patricia)
NEWS
June 5, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Staff Writer
Kenneth Lee spotted the shotgun-toting man in the frightening Halloween mask in the parking lot of the drug store via security cameras. "'I am armed. Do not come into the store,'" police said the pharmacist shouted repeatedly at the man as he came through the door and walked the 35 feet toward the counter. Using an umbrella as a shield, the masked man vaulted the counter. Lee then fired several shots from a 9mm handgun, and when police arrived, they found the would-be robber dead on the floor.
NEWS
March 3, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
George S. Yacoubian, 79, of Broomall, a Havertown pharmacist who made himself available to customers round the clock, died Monday, Feb. 29, of pancreatic cancer at home. Mr. Yacoubian's dream always had been to operate his own pharmacy, so after managing Ithan Pharmacy in Villanova for several years, he bought Coulson's Pharmacy in Havertown, which he ran from 1976 to 1999, working six days a week. Mr. Yacoubian told the Inquirer in 1994 that he saw many of the same customers year after year in the store at 66 Brookline Blvd.
NEWS
December 6, 2015 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
When Emily Inverso, a pharmacist at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, saw the name pop up on the emergency room admissions board, she did a double take. "I said, 'There's no way there could be another Dan Hussar.' " As soon as she could, she went up to the patient's room and knocked on the door frame. "Do you remember me?" she asked. "He said, 'Keep talking.' And before I could say another word, he said, 'Emily Inverso.' After so many years and so many students, he remembered.
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
FLOZELL LOVE had a distinguished career as a pharmacist, but he wanted more. He no doubt felt a spiritual need that led him to pursue his education in the Bible so that he could become more active in his church and spread the word of God to people, especially the youth, who needed his guidance. Flozell became an ordained deacon at Zion Hill Baptist Church, was an active Boy Scout leader and worked with young people at the Christian Street YMCA. He died Oct. 20 at the age of 95. He lived in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Wolf signed into law Friday a bill expanding access to flu vaccine by allowing children as young as 9 to be immunized at a local pharmacy. The action eliminated a Pennsylvania stipulation that only physicians could administer flu vaccines to school-age children, and granted thousands of pharmacists across the state that same ability. The intention of the bill, sponsored by Rep. Seth Grove (R., York), is to boost vaccination rates - and curb incidents of the flu - by expanding availability and convenience to families who may be unable to find time to visit a doctor, Grove said.
NEWS
March 25, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE ELDERLY woman was eager to convey her gratitude to the pharmacist who had given her the advice she needed for continued health. "Tell Doc I'm drinking my water," she said. Doc was Joseph Allen Wynn, a revered figure in Southwest Philadelphia, where he had served for so many years and where he was known for his deep concern for his neighbors. "He did so much for the Southwest Philadelphia community," said his wife, Yvonne. "He was very concerned for the quality of life for the people, especially the elderly.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
There are multitaskers, and then there's Mayank Amin: pharmacist, entertainer, Hollywood body double, youth advocate, and owner of an event-planning firm whose clients include the Phillies. Amin launched Platinum Dream Events L.L.C. in January 2014, four months after starting his pursuit of an MBA from Villanova University - the "fast track" option, of course. I'm still catching my breath after spending a couple of hours with him last week, during which Amin dialed up Chris Brown's Turn Up the Music on his iPhone and busted a few moves for a photographer.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|