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Pharmacist

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NEWS
June 17, 1997 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Abe Hailperin, 86, a retired pharmacist who operated Conroy Drugs in Moorestown for 34 years, died Saturday at West Jersey Hospital-Marlton. Mr. Hailperin had lived in Moorestown for 45 years. He was born and raised in Newark. A pharmacist for 54 years, Mr. Hailperin operated Conroy Drugs before retiring in 1986. The Moorestown landmark had been in existence for more than a half century before its closing. For Mr. Hailperin, the local pharmacy was a family business - with his wife and children working in the store - and a calling.
NEWS
May 8, 1999 | By Gregory J. Sullivan
'Conscience," explains the Catechism of the Catholic Church, "is a judgment of reason whereby the human person recognizes the moral quality of a concrete act that he is going to perform, is in the process of performing, or has already completed. " And it adds: "In all he says and does, man is obliged to follow faithfully what he knows to be just and right. " A law that strongly protects a person's obligation of conscience, particularly in the area of his professional work, is admirable.
NEWS
August 26, 1999 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hyman "Doc" Solomon, 91, an old-fashioned pharmacist who during a nearly 60-year career made elixirs, compounds and capsules of medicine when not serving ice cream sodas, died of heart failure Monday at Albert Einstein Medical Center. He lived in Rhawnhurst. Mr. Solomon earned his nickname, like many other early druggists, because he was certified by the state to formulate his own over-the-counter prescriptions. "If you had a cough or anemia, he would make an elixir for you," son-in-law Martin Ellick said.
NEWS
January 3, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Maurita Robinson Brown, 85, formerly of Ridley Park, a retired pharmacist and a trailblazer, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Saturday at the Attleboro Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Langhorne. In 1943, Mrs. Brown became the first African American woman to graduate from Temple University's School of Pharmacy, after completing her studies in three years. When Temple honored her at her class' 50th reunion, she told a reporter: "I felt right away that there were some on the faculty that wanted me to drop out, and I had to reach inside and find the courage to continue.
NEWS
July 20, 2005 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A drug-addicted pharmacist has admitted stealing more than $150,000 in prescription drugs from a Bucks County hospital where he worked, authorities said yesterday. Brian S. Young, 42, of Gilbertsville, Montgomery County, was fired after his arrest Monday outside Grand View Hospital in Sellersville. At the time, he carried 200 pills he had just stolen from the hospital pharmacy, District Attorney Diane E. Gibbons said. Under questioning, Young said he had swiped more than 30,000 OxyContin pills since 2003, court records say. Young told investigators he had been addicted for several years, and had stolen unknown quantities of other drugs over the past five years.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | By Tom Sheridan, Special to The Inquirer
The April arrest of an illegal dealer in prescription drugs led to an undercover operation that netted a Bristol Borough pharmacist on drug charges this week. Bucks County District Attorney Alan M. Rubenstein said that the "dealer agreed to go undercover" after his arrest and that, on behalf of authorities, he bought large doses of Tylenol with codeine, percocet and placidyl on seven occasions over the last three months from James Rocco, 42, of Bristol Borough. Rocco, who operates Rocco's Pharmacy on Farragut Avenue in Bristol - where authorities said the drug buys took place, was arrested Monday and charged with dispensing to a drug-dependent person, unlawful dispensing of drugs by a practitioner, altering prescriptions and violations of the drug labeling act. After the arrest, Rocco was released on his own recognizance and his bail was set at $250,000.
NEWS
October 27, 1995 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bernard Friedman, 80, founder of the Barclay Prescription Pharmacy at 18th and Spruce Streets in Rittenhouse Square, died Wednesday at Pennsylvania Hospital. Mr. Friedman, who was born in Philadelphia and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania and the Temple University School of Pharmacy, opened the Barclay in 1941. In the '40s, the composer Leonard Bernstein, architect Louis Kahn and other luminaries would gather at the pharmacy's soda fountain, Mr. Friedman's son, Russell, said.
NEWS
March 18, 2008 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philip Grolnick, 100, a retired pharmacist and drugstore owner, died Friday at his home in Cherry Hill. In the late 1940s, Mr. Grolnick and his younger brother, Abe, opened Grolnick Drugs at Broad and Susquehanna Streets in North Philadelphia. In 1958, they moved their business to Woodbury Heights and operated Southwood Drugs until 1977. After it was sold, Mr. Grolnick continued to work at the store until he retired at 87. The Grolnick brothers had kept "profile cards" on their customers and noted when a patient had a bad reaction to a drug, years before New Jersey began requiring pharmacists to do this.
NEWS
September 6, 1986 | By JIM SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
Stanley Rosenthal, who owned a pharmacy in Frankford for several months, yesterday was sentenced to up to two years in prison by a federal judge for selling more than $50,000 worth of drugs to neighborhood junkies. Rosenthal, 47, of Huntingdon Valley, Montgomery County, also was fined $75,000 by U.S. District Judge James T. Giles. Rosenthal bought the Tremont Pharmacy, 4201 Frankford Ave., on Aug. 20, 1984. The store was closed several months later by agents of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration because of the illegal drug sales.
NEWS
June 20, 1990 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Victor M. "Doc" Quinones, a retired pharmacist and Postal Service clerk who helped neighborhood youngsters get a start in life, died Monday. He was 91 and lived in West Philadelphia. Doc operated his drugstore in the 4100 block of Lancaster Avenue until 1971 with his wife of 48 years, the former Catherine Harris. She died in 1977. They had no children. He also worked during those years as a mail clerk, retiring at age 72. Quinones was born and raised in Puerto Rico, where his mother washed clothes for others to help send her son to school.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 25, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE ELDERLY woman was eager to convey her gratitude to the pharmacist who had given her the advice she needed for continued health. "Tell Doc I'm drinking my water," she said. Doc was Joseph Allen Wynn, a revered figure in Southwest Philadelphia, where he had served for so many years and where he was known for his deep concern for his neighbors. "He did so much for the Southwest Philadelphia community," said his wife, Yvonne. "He was very concerned for the quality of life for the people, especially the elderly.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
There are multitaskers, and then there's Mayank Amin: pharmacist, entertainer, Hollywood body double, youth advocate, and owner of an event-planning firm whose clients include the Phillies. Amin launched Platinum Dream Events L.L.C. in January 2014, four months after starting his pursuit of an MBA from Villanova University - the "fast track" option, of course. I'm still catching my breath after spending a couple of hours with him last week, during which Amin dialed up Chris Brown's Turn Up the Music on his iPhone and busted a few moves for a photographer.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Arthur T. Hilkert, 89, whose training as a Navy pharmacist's mate during World War II eventually led him to a civilian career representing U.S. drug manufacturers overseas, died Monday, July 28, at Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital in Camden following a stroke. Born in Canton, Ohio, Mr. Hilkert graduated from Lehman High School there and served in the Navy from 1943 to late 1945. After boot camp, he studied in a Navy program at St. Lawrence University in Canton, N.Y., and, as a pharmacist's mate, was stationed at what is now the Naval Medical Center in San Diego.
NEWS
August 13, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stephen Foldes, 95, of Glen Mills, a metallurgist and later a pharmacist, died of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Sunday, Aug. 3, in Vitas Hospice at Fitzgerald Mercy Hospital. Mr. Foldes trained as a metallurgist, and worked in the research laboratory in a series of jobs that took him to Bayonne, N.J.; Chicago; Dearborn, Mich.; and Reading, Pa. His last posting in metallurgy was with General Electric at 69th Street and Elmwood Avenue in Philadelphia before being laid off in the early 1970s during a downsizing that targeted engineers.
NEWS
June 10, 2014 | BY PATRICIA MADEJ, Daily News Staff Writer madejp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
IN HIS makeshift shop, set up for one day at 24th Street and Grays Ferry Avenue, William Macharia grazed his hand over four plastic baskets that held goods he offered for sale: Dozens of bracelets, made of cow's horns, purchased by Macharia from artisan women in Kenya. "Nothing goes to waste," he said, referring to the natural resources of his home country. Above the baskets dangled mobiles with zebras and elephants made of banana leaves galloping in the hot June sun. Alongside them were traditional African necklaces with a red, white and blue-beaded square - a depiction of the American flag - dangling at each end. Macharia, 37, of Laurel, Md., in Philly for the 37th Odunde Festival yesterday, said that Africans make use of what they're given.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"BETTER Living Through Chemistry" stars Sam Rockwell as a small-town pharmacist whose suffocating life leads him to violate Tony Montana's prime directive. To wit: Never get high on your own supply. Doug (Rockwell) is a square, suburban guy with a distracted wife (Michelle Monaghan), creepy son and busybody father-in-law (Ken Howard). Into his dead-end life walks drop-dead gorgeous Elizabeth (Olivia Wilde), a pill-popping party girl and trophy wife to an absentee husband.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Harrisburg pharmacist has sued the drugstore chain CVS Caremark in federal court, alleging that the company discriminated against him because he had multiple sclerosis and fired him because he raised safety concerns about CVS's plans to cut staff. In the lawsuit, filed in Harrisburg, Joseph Zorek, 61, said he had worked for the company or its predecessors from 1968 until 2012, when, he said, he was fired. Zorek's suit says CVS violated the American With Disabilities Act for several years when supervisors insisted he use a lift chair not meant for long-term sitting, so that he could see the floor in front of the pharmacy counter.
NEWS
June 10, 2013 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
Ayman Suleiman did not come from a medical family. His father was a truck driver, his mother a housewife. But as a young man in Syria, he was influenced by a close friend's physician brother who told him, "You are a better person if you are helping sick people and your family and your neighborhood. " Suleiman took the words to heart and became an ophthalmologist. Little did he dream that decades later, he would be practicing in the United States, driven here by a fellow eye specialist, British-trained Syrian president Bashar al-Assad.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas C. Bernhardt, 64, of Mount Laurel, president of the New Jersey Pharmacists Association in 1989-90, died of a heart attack on Monday, May 13, at his home. Mr. Bernhardt was a faculty member of the department of pharmacy practice at the University of the Sciences, whose alumni association in 2010 gave him its honorary alumnus award. Born in Philadelphia, he grew up in Moorestown, was a 1967 graduate of Moorestown High School, and earned a bachelor's degree in pharmacy at West Virginia University in 1972.
NEWS
May 2, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Harwitz, the Society Hill psychiatrist who provided first aid to the pharmacist wounded in a shooting Monday night, went to visit his impromptu patient Tuesday at the hospital. The 35-year-old victim was "very poised, very pleasant" as he received visitors at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, said Harwitz, 47, medical director for a children's behavioral health program in Camden. Harwitz described the pharmacist, whose name is being withheld by The Inquirer, as a well-liked fixture in the community.
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