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Pharmacology

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NEWS
August 20, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carmine Paul Bianchi, 86, of Boothwyn, a professor of pharmacology in Philadelphia for many years, died Tuesday, Aug. 13, of a digestive ailment at Taylor Hospice House in Ridley Park. Born in Newark, N.J., and raised in Maplewood, Dr. Bianchi served as an Army surgical technician in Tilton General Hospital at Fort Dix from 1945 to 1947. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry from Columbia University in 1950, a master's in physiology and biochemistry from Rutgers University in 1953, and a doctorate in physiology and physical chemistry in 1956 from Rutgers.
NEWS
January 5, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Concetta Harakal, 90, of Haverford, professor emerita of pharmacology at Temple University Medical School, died Friday, Dec. 27, of a heart attack at Devon Manor. Dr. Harakal began her career at Temple University School of Medicine in 1951 and over the next 50 years became a professor of pharmacology, course director of both the dental and medical school pharmacology programs, and director of pharmacology graduate studies. Even after becoming a professor emerita in 1995, she remained active on the admissions committee, and continued to lecture and attend pharmacology classes.
NEWS
October 19, 1987 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edwin J. Fellows, 83, a pharmacologist whose research into the treatment of mental illness played a major role in the development of the first psychotropic drugs, died Friday at Chestnut Hill Hospital. He was a longtime resident of Oreland, Montgomery County. Mr. Fellows, a former associate professor of pharmacology on the teaching staff of the Temple University School of Medicine, received his doctorate from Ohio State University in 1935. In 1949 he joined SmithKline, where he served as head of the pharmacology section, director of biological sciences, associate director of research, associate director of research and development and head of neurology and cardiology.
NEWS
November 17, 1996 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A University of Vermont vice provost and cancer-research specialist was picked yesterday as the 12th president of Haverford College. Thomas R. Tritton, 48, who will take over the post in July 1997, was chosen over three other finalists, including retiring U.S. Rep. Patricia Schroeder (D., Colo.). He succeeds Tom G. Kessinger, who stepped down this year to head the Aga Khan Trust for Culture in Geneva, Switzerland. Robert Gavin will finish the school year as interim president.
NEWS
February 8, 1997 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George B. Koelle, 78, a distinguished professor of pharmacology at the University of Pennsylvania whose research on enzymes led to new fields of study, died last Saturday at the University of Pennsylvania Hospital. The cause of death was believed to be a pulmonary embolism. Dr. Koelle, who lived in Swarthmore for more than 40 years, developed a stain that enabled researchers to mark, identify and better understand the operation of the enzyme that transmits impulses between nerves and muscles, said Dr. Elliot S. Vesell, chairman of the pharmacology department at the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine at Hershey.
NEWS
December 7, 1996 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Karl H. Beyer Jr., 82, a medical researcher and professor of pharmacology at Hershey Medical Center, died of heart failure Monday at Suburban General Hospital in Norristown. He lived in Gwynedd Valley. Dr. Beyer earned his bachelor of science degree from Western Kentucky State College in 1935 and a doctorate in physiology as well as a medical degree from the University of Wisconsin. His first job, in 1943, was as assistant director of pharmacological research at the former Sharp & Dohme in Glenolden.
NEWS
July 9, 2008 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Catherine J. "Tass" Roberts Bear Erulkar, 88, who pursued her passion for art while traveling with her husband, Solomon D. Erulkar, died June 23 at Bryn Mawr Hospital of complications from surgery. Mrs. Erulkar, who lived in Bala Cynwyd for many years, was a "mother first," said her son Matt, "but she loved art and was an accomplished artist. " Mrs. Erulkar preferred oils, painting primarily still lifes and landscapes, but also worked in watercolors and ceramics. She did a lot of her painting while traveling with her husband of nearly 45 years, a noted professor of neurophysiology at the University of Pennsylvania, on research missions.
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leon Salganicoff, 86, of Center City, a professor emeritus of pharmacology at the Temple University School of Medicine who dealt with challenges on two continents to pursue important medical research, died of heart failure Sunday, April 17, at Montgomery Hospital Medical Center in Norristown. A native of Argentina, Dr. Salganicoff earned a degree in pharmacy and a doctorate in biochemistry from the University of Buenos Aires. He refused to take a political propaganda course and was denied his diploma until after dictator Juan Peron was overthrown in 1955.
NEWS
October 18, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Along with elation, the winners of the Nobel Prize in medicine expressed satisfaction yesterday over the intangible rewards of a life of research - the thrill of the quest, the thought of having benefited humankind. "I would have wished the prize were a team prize because so many people have helped me in my work," said Sir James W. Black, 64, who heads his own research foundation in London and is a professor of analytical pharmacology at King's College Hospital Medical School. The Scotsman, who gave up a lucrative career in commercial research to pursue an academic life, said he regretted the pressure on scientists to pursue commercial applications for their work.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Pennsylvania lawmakers are again taking a crack at legalizing medical marijuana, with the Senate passing a bill Tuesday to allow the drug to be prescribed for epilepsy, chronic pain, cancer, and other ailments. A previous effort failed in the fall. Backers hope that by delivering it to the House earlier in the legislative session, with a supportive governor and a window of compromise surrounding the budget, it can pass this year. Sen. Daylin Leach (D., Montgomery), who cowrote the bill, said having a governor who is enthusiastic about medical marijuana "changes the dynamic completely.
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NEWS
January 5, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Concetta Harakal, 90, of Haverford, professor emerita of pharmacology at Temple University Medical School, died Friday, Dec. 27, of a heart attack at Devon Manor. Dr. Harakal began her career at Temple University School of Medicine in 1951 and over the next 50 years became a professor of pharmacology, course director of both the dental and medical school pharmacology programs, and director of pharmacology graduate studies. Even after becoming a professor emerita in 1995, she remained active on the admissions committee, and continued to lecture and attend pharmacology classes.
NEWS
August 20, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carmine Paul Bianchi, 86, of Boothwyn, a professor of pharmacology in Philadelphia for many years, died Tuesday, Aug. 13, of a digestive ailment at Taylor Hospice House in Ridley Park. Born in Newark, N.J., and raised in Maplewood, Dr. Bianchi served as an Army surgical technician in Tilton General Hospital at Fort Dix from 1945 to 1947. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry from Columbia University in 1950, a master's in physiology and biochemistry from Rutgers University in 1953, and a doctorate in physiology and physical chemistry in 1956 from Rutgers.
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leon Salganicoff, 86, of Center City, a professor emeritus of pharmacology at the Temple University School of Medicine who dealt with challenges on two continents to pursue important medical research, died of heart failure Sunday, April 17, at Montgomery Hospital Medical Center in Norristown. A native of Argentina, Dr. Salganicoff earned a degree in pharmacy and a doctorate in biochemistry from the University of Buenos Aires. He refused to take a political propaganda course and was denied his diploma until after dictator Juan Peron was overthrown in 1955.
NEWS
July 9, 2008 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Catherine J. "Tass" Roberts Bear Erulkar, 88, who pursued her passion for art while traveling with her husband, Solomon D. Erulkar, died June 23 at Bryn Mawr Hospital of complications from surgery. Mrs. Erulkar, who lived in Bala Cynwyd for many years, was a "mother first," said her son Matt, "but she loved art and was an accomplished artist. " Mrs. Erulkar preferred oils, painting primarily still lifes and landscapes, but also worked in watercolors and ceramics. She did a lot of her painting while traveling with her husband of nearly 45 years, a noted professor of neurophysiology at the University of Pennsylvania, on research missions.
NEWS
February 8, 1997 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George B. Koelle, 78, a distinguished professor of pharmacology at the University of Pennsylvania whose research on enzymes led to new fields of study, died last Saturday at the University of Pennsylvania Hospital. The cause of death was believed to be a pulmonary embolism. Dr. Koelle, who lived in Swarthmore for more than 40 years, developed a stain that enabled researchers to mark, identify and better understand the operation of the enzyme that transmits impulses between nerves and muscles, said Dr. Elliot S. Vesell, chairman of the pharmacology department at the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine at Hershey.
NEWS
December 7, 1996 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Karl H. Beyer Jr., 82, a medical researcher and professor of pharmacology at Hershey Medical Center, died of heart failure Monday at Suburban General Hospital in Norristown. He lived in Gwynedd Valley. Dr. Beyer earned his bachelor of science degree from Western Kentucky State College in 1935 and a doctorate in physiology as well as a medical degree from the University of Wisconsin. His first job, in 1943, was as assistant director of pharmacological research at the former Sharp & Dohme in Glenolden.
NEWS
November 17, 1996 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A University of Vermont vice provost and cancer-research specialist was picked yesterday as the 12th president of Haverford College. Thomas R. Tritton, 48, who will take over the post in July 1997, was chosen over three other finalists, including retiring U.S. Rep. Patricia Schroeder (D., Colo.). He succeeds Tom G. Kessinger, who stepped down this year to head the Aga Khan Trust for Culture in Geneva, Switzerland. Robert Gavin will finish the school year as interim president.
NEWS
October 18, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Along with elation, the winners of the Nobel Prize in medicine expressed satisfaction yesterday over the intangible rewards of a life of research - the thrill of the quest, the thought of having benefited humankind. "I would have wished the prize were a team prize because so many people have helped me in my work," said Sir James W. Black, 64, who heads his own research foundation in London and is a professor of analytical pharmacology at King's College Hospital Medical School. The Scotsman, who gave up a lucrative career in commercial research to pursue an academic life, said he regretted the pressure on scientists to pursue commercial applications for their work.
NEWS
October 19, 1987 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edwin J. Fellows, 83, a pharmacologist whose research into the treatment of mental illness played a major role in the development of the first psychotropic drugs, died Friday at Chestnut Hill Hospital. He was a longtime resident of Oreland, Montgomery County. Mr. Fellows, a former associate professor of pharmacology on the teaching staff of the Temple University School of Medicine, received his doctorate from Ohio State University in 1935. In 1949 he joined SmithKline, where he served as head of the pharmacology section, director of biological sciences, associate director of research, associate director of research and development and head of neurology and cardiology.
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