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SPORTS
August 10, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple teammates Brandon Matthews and Matthew Teesdale are among Philadelphia-area players who will compete in the 114th U.S. Amateur Championship, beginning Monday at the Atlanta Athletic Club. Others who are part of the 312-player field include Chris Crawford of Bensalem; former Haverford resident John Sawin, now living in San Francisco; and J.D. Dornes and David Denlinger, both of Lancaster. The championship will begin with 36-hole stroke play qualifying Monday and Tuesday.
NEWS
August 10, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 62-year-old Afghan doctor detained in Philadelphia this week on immigration fraud charges received and passed along coded messages from an anti-Western terror group with ties to al-Qaeda, federal prosecutors said. At a court hearing Friday, Assistant U.S. Attorney Jennifer Arbittier Williams said FBI agents discovered the documents written in Pashto and hidden between glued pages of religious tracts mailed to Hayatullah Dawari's Northeast Philadelphia home. The package, intercepted during a January raid, came from Pakistan and included instructions to forward several books inside to various people across the United States.
NEWS
August 9, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Philadelphia Police Lt. Aisha Perry seems to have learned that a 10-minute rant at the judge is not the path to freedom. After a brief court appearance in which she said she was "humbled" and sorry, and respected the jury that convicted her of stealing utility services, Perry was paroled Thursday from her six- to 23-month prison term by Common Pleas Court Judge Earl W. Trent. Trent had sent Perry to prison June 12 after two extraordinary in-court tirades, one after a jury found her guilty, and the other when she was sentenced and accused the prosecutor of being a liar "jealous of my lifestyle.
SPORTS
August 9, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
Drexel athletic director Eric Zillmer had no doubt Thursday's vote by the NCAA Division I board of directors would grant approval for the "Power Five" conferences to gain the autonomy to chart their own course. He also has no doubt this is the wrong course for college sports. He hopes schools override the vote, as Drexel plans to do. Zillmer believes the Big Ten, Pac-12, Southeastern Conference, Atlantic Coast Conference, and Big 12 are grabbing fistfuls of more power by hiding behind what Zillmer calls "their version of enhancing student welfare.
SPORTS
August 9, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
SPRINGFIELD, Mass. - Philadelphia's representatives in the Basketball Hall of Fame's Class of 2014 sat on stage Thursday and occasionally glanced up at the second-floor gallery where, glowing like familiar stars in an alien sky, the illuminated faces of earlier Philly basketball legends looked back. Those Hall of Fame predecessors and the city's rich and welcoming basketball culture, these inductees insisted, set them on a path to Springfield. "Growing up outside Philly in the late 1950s, early 1960s, there was nothing bigger than basketball," said Gary Williams, the South Jersey-born coach whose long and successful coaching career included an NCAA title in 2002 at Maryland.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Philadelphia Police Lieutenant Aisha Perry seems to have learned that a 10-minute rant at the judge is not the path to freedom. After a brief court appearance in which she said she was "humbled" and sorry and respected the jury that convicted her for stealing utility services, Perry was paroled from her six- to 23-month prison term on Thursday by Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Earl W. Trent. Trent had sent Perry to prison on June 12 after two extraordinary in-court tirades, one after a jury found her guilty and the other when she was sentenced and accused the prosecutor of being a liar who was "jealous of my lifestyle.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia lawyer Max Gerson Kramer said he had to check the status of another case, so he told client Dante Hill he'd be back soon, and to wait in Courtroom 603 of the Criminal Justice Center for the start of Hill's preliminary hearing on drug charges. It was shortly before noon Tuesday, and that was the last Kramer saw of the 25-year-old Hill. It wasn't that Hill decided to flee or take a pass on the justice system. That happens every day. Instead, Hill had been whisked out of Municipal Judge Wendy L. Pew's courtroom by a city homicide detective and charged in a three-year-old murder.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
GOV. CORBETT yesterday authorized $265 million in state funds to be advanced to the beleaguered Philadelphia School District to assure that schools open on time, but district Superintendent William Hite could not guarantee a Sept. 8 opening. "It changes nothing about what we are considering, although it adds significant information in the decision-making process," Hite said during a news conference alongside Corbett and School Reform Commission members in the governor's offices at the Bellevue, on Broad Street near Walnut.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
All Billy Cress has to do to become inspired is take a walk. The 29-year-old Fishtown resident walks the streets of Rittenhouse Square, Society Hill, Fitler Square, and elsewhere in Philadelphia. He looks at the houses along them, searching for the unusual and the beautiful. And when one catches his eye, he pulls out his iPhone and snaps a photo. He's an Instagrammer. Cress, who works for a soccer retail company in King of Prussia, began posting his photos on Instagram a few years back with the hashtag he created, #phillyhomeportrait.
NEWS
August 7, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last year, River Trappler wrote a $1,200 check to help pay for essential staff to keep her daughters' Philadelphia public school running. She wasn't sure then that things could get much worse. But this year, she's not sure if school will even open on time. Unsure of what else to do, Trappler and daughters Zuza and Petra Jevremovic picked up handmade signs and stood in front of Center City's Greenfield Elementary School on Tuesday, joining dozens of parents, children, teachers, and others to demand that state lawmakers act to fund city schools.
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