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Philabundance

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NEWS
July 5, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bill Clark, the executive director of Philabundance, who has been credited as an innovator in the fight against hunger, announced his resignation from the agency Thursday. For 13 years, Clark, 61, ran the $50-million-a-year hunger-relief behemoth that is based in South Philadelphia and serves nine counties in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Philabundance moves 30 million pounds of food a year to 426 pantries in a region whose core is the poorest big city in America. Mark Bender, a member of the Philabundance board, was appointed interim executive director, according to a statement from Murvin Lackey, chairman of the board.
SPORTS
July 1, 2011
Bill Clark, the president and executive director of Philabundance, the Philadelphia area's largest hunger relief organization, estimates that 900,000 people here are at risk of hunger. With that staggering statistic in mind, the Phillies and Citizens Bank announced a hunger relief initiative called Phans Feeding Families. This initiative began on Thursday and will culminate during the July 31 home game against the Pittsburgh Pirates, with the aim of uniting the Phillies community in support of hunger relief.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
You might consider Glenn Bergman, 63, something of the Zelig of Philadelphia's food scene. There he was in the '80s, humping desserts for a Frog Commissary-catered party. Then grilling stuffed veal loin at La Terasse. Then running a corporate dining unit. By 2004, he was leading the fourfold growth of Mount Airy's (and later Chestnut Hill's) Weaver's Way Co-op from funky grocer to spiffy organics purveyor to urban farmer. Next month, he'll put on a new hat - top manager of Philabundance, the city's enduring antihunger organization.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Glenn Bergman had food, and Pam Lawler wanted it. These were the nascent days of Philabundance, when Lawler - founder of the region's largest hunger-relief organization - would drive to area businesses in her blue Subaru station wagon, seeking leftovers. Bergman was executive chef at Frog Commissary catering in the late 1980s, and after cooking for giant parties at the Franklin Institute, he had food that was still fresh. "That was the question Philabundance answered," Bergman said.
NEWS
October 31, 2009 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
About 30 people already were waiting in the chilly drizzle when Eugene Dickerson, 37, arrived at the Lindenwold PATCO station to help distribute free produce and other items through Philabundance's Fresh for All program. A half-hour later, still 30 minutes before food would be passed out, the line in the parking lot had grown to about 200 people. "Normally, we have even more than that," said Dickerson, an out-of-work chef who volunteers every Saturday for the 1:30 p.m. event.
NEWS
December 29, 2015 | By Stephanie Farr, Staff Writer
Scores of people - many of them elderly, with small, rickety carts in tow - began lining both sides of 62d Street near Cedar Avenue in West Philly at 4 a.m. They sat on milk crates and boxes one Monday this month, waiting for hours for someone to bring them what they need most this holiday season: food. Philabundance truck driver Jackie Cooley Jr. pulled up shortly after noon - as he has every Monday for three years - and beeped his horn. The crowd cheered and parted. "We love you, Jackie!"
NEWS
January 7, 2001 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
An improving economy is supposed to benefit all, but staff members of the food-recycling charity Philabundance know that in Delaware County, as elsewhere, despite recent general prosperity, many people are still struggling. The Philadelphia-based nonprofit recently extended its Delaware County food donations beyond the larger groups it has supplied for many years. Census Bureau estimates for 1997, the latest year available, show that 8.5 percent of the county's 540,000 residents and 13 percent of its children live in poverty.
NEWS
November 23, 1998 | By Mark Binker, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
PhilAbundance, a Philadelphia-based nonprofit that provides fresh foods to homeless shelters and soup kitchens, will expand its service in Bucks County by 300 percent, starting this week. The program, which collects leftover food from restaurants and distributes it to the poor, has been supplying three shelters in the county. This week, it will begin supplying seven additional sites. Over the next 12 months, the organization hopes to deliver about 100,000 pounds of food to Bucks County shelters.
NEWS
September 26, 2008 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philabundance has received about $225,000 in donations to fund a children's milk program it had planned to cut, the region's largest hunger-relief agency announced yesterday. Most of the money for 18 after-school and day-care agencies serving 1,045 children comes from a single donor who requested anonymity, said Bill Clark, agency president and executive director. The reinstated program will cost $100,000 a year, and Clark said the donations would be used to keep it going at least two years.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Olivia Exstrum, Staff Writer
Think of it as Uber for leftovers. Instead of ordering a personal ride, imagine a lift to run unused meals to a local food bank. The Food Connect app, launched Friday by Food Connect and other local antihunger organizations, was created as a solution to the massive food waste anticipated during the Democratic National Convention. The app is available for download on iTunes and the Google Play store. Starting Saturday, restaurants, caterers, and anyone who has food to donate can download the app, enter their location and a pickup time, and have their extra food picked up by a car, van, or truck, depending on the size of the donation.
NEWS
June 21, 2016 | By Valerie Brown Traoré and Glenn Bergman
Thousands of parents aren't celebrating the arrival of summer. They're dreading it. That's because 300,000 children in our area will lose their school meals this summer, and local food banks, emergency kitchens, and pantries are bracing for the dire need about to hit. How bad is the problem? In Camden, Philadelphia, and the surrounding areas, hunger is almost twice as pervasive as in the rest of the country. Here, a staggering one in four people face hunger; nationwide, the number is one in seven.
NEWS
December 29, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Staff Writer
SCORES OF people - many of them elderly, with small, rickety carts in tow - began lining both sides of 62nd Street near Cedar Avenue in West Philly at 4 a.m. They sat on milk crates and boxes one Monday this month, waiting for hours for someone to bring them what they need most this holiday season: Food. Philabundance truck driver Jackie Cooley Jr. pulled up shortly after noon - as he has every Monday for three years - and beeped his horn. The crowd cheered and parted. "We love you, Jackie!"
NEWS
December 29, 2015 | By Stephanie Farr, Staff Writer
Scores of people - many of them elderly, with small, rickety carts in tow - began lining both sides of 62d Street near Cedar Avenue in West Philly at 4 a.m. They sat on milk crates and boxes one Monday this month, waiting for hours for someone to bring them what they need most this holiday season: food. Philabundance truck driver Jackie Cooley Jr. pulled up shortly after noon - as he has every Monday for three years - and beeped his horn. The crowd cheered and parted. "We love you, Jackie!"
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2015 | By Bill Chenevert, For The Inquirer
If you were lucky enough to experience an abundance of food, warmth, familial affection, and good will last week, it might mean you're in a position to pay it forward. December is a big month for philanthropy, and you can be a big part of that. Giving Tuesday might have already past, but, as Philabundance reminds, hunger is an issue 365 days a year. Even if you can find it in your heart to donate goods, to volunteer, to write a check or to offer assistance, it's worth considering a New Year's resolution, as well, to give more in 2016.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
An outage of a high-load power service forced a Chestnut Hill grocery store to close Monday, creating an unexpected bonus for Philabundance, the regional food-pantry supplier. Peco Energy Co. said three commercial customers lost heavy-duty power service early Monday, including the Weavers Way Co-op at 8424 Germantown Ave. Peco spokesman Greg Smore said the utility's crews worked until early Tuesday to complete work replacing a faulty 30-foot section of underground cable in the Chestnut Hill business district.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
You might consider Glenn Bergman, 63, something of the Zelig of Philadelphia's food scene. There he was in the '80s, humping desserts for a Frog Commissary-catered party. Then grilling stuffed veal loin at La Terasse. Then running a corporate dining unit. By 2004, he was leading the fourfold growth of Mount Airy's (and later Chestnut Hill's) Weaver's Way Co-op from funky grocer to spiffy organics purveyor to urban farmer. Next month, he'll put on a new hat - top manager of Philabundance, the city's enduring antihunger organization.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Glenn Bergman had food, and Pam Lawler wanted it. These were the nascent days of Philabundance, when Lawler - founder of the region's largest hunger-relief organization - would drive to area businesses in her blue Subaru station wagon, seeking leftovers. Bergman was executive chef at Frog Commissary catering in the late 1980s, and after cooking for giant parties at the Franklin Institute, he had food that was still fresh. "That was the question Philabundance answered," Bergman said.
NEWS
February 12, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
George Matysik knew he really didn't have a chance. He's young, polite, and earnest, has no money and less name recognition, and is really into talking about things like, say, how to reduce poverty in the poorest big city in the country. Those aren't the kind of things that get you elected to City Council. Matysik, former public policy director for the nonprofit food bank Philabundance, knew that when he jumped into the crowded race for a Democratic City Council at-large seat last November.
NEWS
August 23, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even as the economy recovers, the number of hungry Americans is increasing, with working people, military members, children, and the elderly among those suffering from lack of food. Those findings are in a major survey of people who use food pantries commissioned by Feeding America, the nation's largest hunger-relief organization. A new report comes out every four years. The 2014 report shows that one in seven Americans, or 46.5 million people, received food from a Feeding America food bank.
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