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ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Last month, a smart young writer at the Washington Post named Lydia DePillis wrote a provocative article about cities and families that lit up every urbanists' social-media feed. In it, she observed something parents have known for a long time: Kids are expensive. "Why, from a purely economic standpoint, would a city on the make try to attract families at all?" she asked. The question stopped me in my tracks. For America's comeback cities, the ability to land and keep middle-class families is considered a badge of success.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, Daily News Staff Writer eichelm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5909
DAVID LYNCH is all over Philly right now. The director behind such cinema classics as "Blue Velvet," "The Elephant Man," "Eraserhead" and the landmark television series "Twin Peaks" is being honored by his alma mater, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Art, with a four-month-long exhibit, and there are screenings happening all over the city. While cinephiles know Lynch for his wonderfully weird and ambiguous screen work, and art-world fans know him for his visual work, not everyone is familiar with Lynch or why he's getting the full Philly treatment.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1990 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
It's still Frank's, thanks. But because of the quiet sale of the 95-year- old local institution to an Elizabeth, N.J., bottler, Frank's Beverages are no longer made in Philadelphia. Frank's sodas, including cream, birch beer and the legendary Black Cherry Wishniak, are being manufactured and bottled these days in North Jersey, at the plant of C&C Cola. The grandson and great-grandson of founder Jacob Frank sold the business in August to C&C, owned by a fellow independent bottler who'd been wooing them for some time.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
A FIRST-GRADE teacher on Kickstarter is trying to raise money for tablets to help her students improve their reading and math skills. A rookie music teacher on GoFundMe is trying to cobble enough together to buy musical instruments. On that same crowdfunding site, another instructor is hoping to raise money to set up a game room for students who have emotional and behavioral needs. With so much lacking in Philadelphia schools, I had to give these teachers props for thinking past just surviving.
SPORTS
September 8, 2014 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
If Nick Foles shared a table with former Philadelphia quarterbacks, the select fraternity who are the only ones who understand the life Foles now lives, he would ask them about the aftermath of a bad game. "And the emotions that go with it, just how we're a unique profession," Foles said in an interview with The Inquirer. "If you have one bad game, it's really going to be talked about. . . . I would ask them how they dealt with it when they had that bad game, when everybody was down on them, what they do. Because that's what I want to learn.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The scene at the Loft District's new Goldtex building couldn't have been more tranquil. Workers were wrapping up construction, patching cracks in the concrete and nestling shrubs into planters. A notice on the window of the retail space heralded the opening of a restaurant. Residents skipped down the front steps, off to their Center City jobs. It's hard to believe that only two years ago, the corner of 12th and Wood was Philadelphia's most notorious construction site. A dispute between powerful building-trades unions and two young, maverick developers escalated into an old-style, head-busting labor war that became a symbol of the divide between old Philadelphia and new Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 5, 2010
STANDING IN line in the post office the other day, I was delighted at the response when two customers at the window were short of cash. Each time someone quickly supplied the 10 cents and 48 cents needed. And a lady asked an elderly woman (me) to go ahead of her in line! Did you know that on Nov. 26, Mayor Nutter participated in a reading from scripture in City Hall at the invitation of the American Bible Society? Indeed, the mayor read from Psalms and was followed by the president of the Westminster Theological Seminary and then by many others.
NEWS
February 3, 1991
Friday's front page brought news about two of Philadelphia's genial, if quite different, old gentlemen - G. Stockton Strawbridge and Peter Camiel. Mr. Strawbidge, 77, the Grand Old Man of Market Street East, was receiving the Powell Award for his civic accomplishments; Mr. Camiel, the one-time boss of the city's Democratic Party (but who is somewhat more famous as the man who proved Frank Rizzo a liar), had died at 81. The easy thing is to talk about Mr. Strawbridge's grand and glorious achievements and contrast them with Mr. Camiel's amusing if venal activities in trying to make the world a better place for, among others, the state's beer distributors in whose behalf he labored ceaselessly while a state senator.
SPORTS
November 19, 1996 | By Mayer Brandschain, FOR THE INQUIRER
Philadelphia won the intercity squash racquets matches for the Lockett Cup with 5-0 victories over Baltimore, Boston and New York yesterday at Chestnut Hill Academy. The Philadelphia team included Ben Desombre, Jim Masland, Rob Whitehouse, Rich Sheppard and Trip Davis. Desombre is the Philadelphia champion. Baltimore won the Class B title by defeating Philadelphia, 3-2.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Even during lean years, Opera Philadelphia could manage at least a klieg light for its season opener. Now celebrating its 40th anniversary with financial stability and grand plans for seasons to come, Opera Philadelphia had two lanes of Broad Street blocked Friday with a climate-controlled tent to house a catered dinner. First, there was an intimate concert with 400 listeners sitting on the Academy of Music stage to hear internationally established singers whose careers began here, Ailyn Perez and Stephen Costello.
NEWS
September 15, 2014
C OLEMAN and Ilene Poses, of West Mount Airy, founded Chilly Philly Ice Cream in 1998. Coleman, 66, retired last month from research and information management in the city's Department of Behavioral Health. Ilene, 63, is a retired special-education teacher in the Philadelphia School District. I spoke with Coleman. Q: How did you come up with the idea for Chilly Philly? A: We came back from a vacation in 1995 and learned that Breyers had decided to leave the city. That upset me because I grew up close to their plant [in West Philadelphia]
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Robert Moran and Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writers
A Philadelphia schoolteacher died Thursday from stab wounds police believed were self-inflicted in a lobby restroom at a South Philadelphia hotel. The woman, 48, was a sixth grade teacher at Key School in the 2200 block of South Eighth Street in South Philadelphia. She reported for work Thursday morning, but left without notifying the principal, said Fernando Gallard, spokesman for the School District. At 8:11 a.m., police were called to the Holiday Inn at 1000 Packer Ave., where the woman was found with stab wounds to her neck, a breast, and arms, said Officer Tanya Little.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia police are investigating an incident of anti-Semitic vandalism in which swastikas were painted on the outside of a butcher store in Northeast Philadelphia. The owner of Simon's Kosher, on the 6900 block of Bustleton Avenue, discovered several swastikas painted on the outside of the store around 8:22 a.m. Thursday, police said. The symbols were painted in red on the storefront and on the rear of the building, police said. Detectives are investigating. Police said no similar incidents had been reported in the area recently.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia District Attorney's Office is investigating the embezzlement of $210,000 from the region's publicly funded marketing agency and, in the process, reviewing how the agency dealt with the matter when it was uncovered two years ago. The money had been used to pay for personal purchases by Visit Philadelphia's chief financial officer, Joyce Levitt, who was permitted to resign rather than face criminal charges when she made restitution....
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Last month, a smart young writer at the Washington Post named Lydia DePillis wrote a provocative article about cities and families that lit up every urbanists' social-media feed. In it, she observed something parents have known for a long time: Kids are expensive. "Why, from a purely economic standpoint, would a city on the make try to attract families at all?" she asked. The question stopped me in my tracks. For America's comeback cities, the ability to land and keep middle-class families is considered a badge of success.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia police officer was arrested Thursday on domestic-assault charges, police said. Joseph Griffin, an eight-year veteran of the force, physically assaulted his wife, police said. Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey suspended him for 30 days with intent to dismiss. Griffin, 30, turned himself at the department's Internal Affairs division Thursday morning, police said. He could not be reached for comment, and a call to his lawyer was not returned. The District Attorney's Office said Griffin assaulted and threatened his wife during a June 4 incident at their home in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
A FIRST-GRADE teacher on Kickstarter is trying to raise money for tablets to help her students improve their reading and math skills. A rookie music teacher on GoFundMe is trying to cobble enough together to buy musical instruments. On that same crowdfunding site, another instructor is hoping to raise money to set up a game room for students who have emotional and behavioral needs. With so much lacking in Philadelphia schools, I had to give these teachers props for thinking past just surviving.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bonnie Blank is about 40 years older than a traditional college student, but she hasn't stopped going to class. One Day University is an adult education program, offered throughout the country, that recruits top university professors to lecture at single-day learning opportunities. Through the program, Blank has been able to quench her thirst for learning without signing up for a full semester. She plans to attend one such event Sunday at the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown. The event is sponsored by The Inquirer.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, Daily News Staff Writer eichelm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5909
DAVID LYNCH is all over Philly right now. The director behind such cinema classics as "Blue Velvet," "The Elephant Man," "Eraserhead" and the landmark television series "Twin Peaks" is being honored by his alma mater, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Art, with a four-month-long exhibit, and there are screenings happening all over the city. While cinephiles know Lynch for his wonderfully weird and ambiguous screen work, and art-world fans know him for his visual work, not everyone is familiar with Lynch or why he's getting the full Philly treatment.
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