CollectionsPhiladelphia
IN THE NEWS

Philadelphia

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1990 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
It's still Frank's, thanks. But because of the quiet sale of the 95-year- old local institution to an Elizabeth, N.J., bottler, Frank's Beverages are no longer made in Philadelphia. Frank's sodas, including cream, birch beer and the legendary Black Cherry Wishniak, are being manufactured and bottled these days in North Jersey, at the plant of C&C Cola. The grandson and great-grandson of founder Jacob Frank sold the business in August to C&C, owned by a fellow independent bottler who'd been wooing them for some time.
NEWS
July 23, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
FOSTER KID. Young. Black. Philadelphia. Shot. Dead. Over Nothing. Have you stopped caring yet? Seventeen-year-old Tremaine Rogers didn't have a bag of Skittles or an iced tea on him when he was shot in the back on July 13 outside of his home. He had a basketball. Tremaine wasn't stalked by a paranoid man of another race in the dark of night. He was killed in his own back yard at 4 p.m. by two black men for refusing to answer one question: "We cool?" And yet his senseless death, which came just hours before the not-guilty verdict in the trial of George Zimmerman, brought no outrage in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
The commentator called it "another World Cup match absolutely dripping in drama. " And at Commerce Square in Philadelphia, the drama was flowing as fans came together to cheer on Team USA. The stone courtyard at 20th and Market Streets transformed into a stadium Tuesday, filled with fans whose chants echoed off the two buildings nearby. People in suits having outdoor meetings conveniently during the match, college students, and families packed themselves in for the United States-Belgium showdown, which ended in a heartbreaking 2-1 loss for Team USA. Keith Barry, 26, of Philadelphia, was shaking from nerves.
NEWS
January 5, 2010
STANDING IN line in the post office the other day, I was delighted at the response when two customers at the window were short of cash. Each time someone quickly supplied the 10 cents and 48 cents needed. And a lady asked an elderly woman (me) to go ahead of her in line! Did you know that on Nov. 26, Mayor Nutter participated in a reading from scripture in City Hall at the invitation of the American Bible Society? Indeed, the mayor read from Psalms and was followed by the president of the Westminster Theological Seminary and then by many others.
NEWS
February 3, 1991
Friday's front page brought news about two of Philadelphia's genial, if quite different, old gentlemen - G. Stockton Strawbridge and Peter Camiel. Mr. Strawbidge, 77, the Grand Old Man of Market Street East, was receiving the Powell Award for his civic accomplishments; Mr. Camiel, the one-time boss of the city's Democratic Party (but who is somewhat more famous as the man who proved Frank Rizzo a liar), had died at 81. The easy thing is to talk about Mr. Strawbridge's grand and glorious achievements and contrast them with Mr. Camiel's amusing if venal activities in trying to make the world a better place for, among others, the state's beer distributors in whose behalf he labored ceaselessly while a state senator.
NEWS
November 16, 1988 | By DAN ROTTENBERG
Over lunch the other day, the head of a high-profile Philadelphia company confided that he recently almost moved his headquarters from Center City to Bala Cynwyd. His company needs more space, he said - and if it's going to move, why not move across City Line, where taxes are lower, traffic is lighter, potholes are fewer and you can go for months on end without confronting a vagrant, hooker, a drug dealer or a mugger? My executive friend ultimately decided against such a move - but only because of its potential negative effects on his company's image.
SPORTS
November 19, 1996 | By Mayer Brandschain, FOR THE INQUIRER
Philadelphia won the intercity squash racquets matches for the Lockett Cup with 5-0 victories over Baltimore, Boston and New York yesterday at Chestnut Hill Academy. The Philadelphia team included Ben Desombre, Jim Masland, Rob Whitehouse, Rich Sheppard and Trip Davis. Desombre is the Philadelphia champion. Baltimore won the Class B title by defeating Philadelphia, 3-2.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2012
Fish 1234 Locust St. 215-545-9600 fishphilly.com Oyster House 1516 Sansom St. Philadelphia 215-567-7683 oysterhousephilly.com Route 6 600 N. Broad St. 215-391-4600 route6restaurant.com  
SPORTS
April 29, 1999 | By Doug Hadden, FOR THE INQUIRER
Overbrook's Chris Lange and Andy Thompson each won singles matches and teamed for a 4-and-3 win in the better-ball competition against Little Mill's Mike Hyland and Manasquan's Bob Housen to lead the Golf Association of Philadelphia to an 11-7 win over the New Jersey State Golf Association yesterday in the 37th annual Compher Cup at Metedeconk National. The results Singles matches Ron Vannelli, Metuchen, def. Jamie Slonis, Little Mill, 2 and 1; Robbie Gaglioti, Twin Brook, def. Jarrett Kling, Merion, 1 up; Oscar Mestre, Overbrook, def. Kevin Purcell, Forest Hill, 3 and 2; Chip Lutz, Berkshire, def. Bill Henry, Forsgate, 5 and 4; Harry Goett 3d, Ash Brook, def. Tom Shallow, Phila.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A West Philadelphia man who told police he accidentally beat his infant son to death while trying to punch the family dog was sentenced to 20 to 40 years in prison Friday. Samuel N. Cabrera, 28, dropped his head to the defense table and cried as his punishment was announced after a sentencing hearing in Common Pleas Court. He shook his head and remained quiet when Judge Sandy L.V. Byrd asked him if he had anything to say for his crimes. Cabrera was convicted in November of third-degree murder and endangering the welfare of a child, after a trial in which witnesses described the various stories he told about the injuries his child sustained.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra last toured Europe in 2011 in deeply uncertain circumstances: The orchestra was still in bankruptcy and entering contract negotiations amid fears about the future. Yannick Nézet-Séguin had been appointed, but would not become music director until the next year. The orchestra was led by chief conductor Charles Dutoit. In contrast, the 2015 Tour of Europe, announced Tuesday, promises to be a consolidation of more successful times for the Philadelphia Orchestra, and under the leadership of Nézet-Séguin, already a well-known figure there.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
If leaders of the Philadelphia Singers are ready to throw in the towel, the singers themselves aren't. A core group of members, plus assistant conductor Brian Schkeeper, says it is forming its own successor organization - a new 150-voice symphonic choir. The effort is being led by six or seven members, and already about 80 current singers have signed on to sing on, says Schkeeper. "I think it's an artistic imperative to continue professional music-making," he says, referring to the Philadelphia Singers' pioneering role as a substantially paid, rather than all-volunteer, choir.
SPORTS
January 14, 2015 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
IN 1910 THE Philadelphia Cricket Club hosted the U.S. Open for the second time in 4 years, on its St. Martins course in Chestnut Hill, nine holes of which are still there. In 2020 the Wissahickon and Militia Hill courses in Flourtown will be the site of the first USGA championship to be held at the club since then, the newly created U.S. Amateur men's Four-Ball. The inaugural championship is being held in early May at The Olympic Club in San Francisco, the first competition on the USGA schedule (the inaugural women's championship is the following week at Oregon's Bandon Dunes resort)
BUSINESS
January 13, 2015
New Jersey Realtors , a nonprofit professional organization, has installed Eugenia K. Bonilla as president. Bonilla is a broker-sales associate with Berkshire Hathaway Home Services Fox & Roach in Mount Laurel. She also serves as vice president of the New Jersey Real Estate Commission. The National Adoption Center , Philadelphia, has elected the following officers: Michael L. Rifkin , senior vice president at Morgan Stanley, president; Andrew P. March , managing director, growth & strategy at Accenture, vice president; Patricia Daly , former vice president and general counsel for Lincoln Financial Advisors, secretary; Melissa Codkind , CEO of Initiatives Events, vice president; Bruce D. Davis Jr. , vice president of Niska Gas Storage, vice president; and Seth Goldblum , managing director, CMF Associates, treasurer.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | BY DON SAPATKIN, |INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Has your favorite Center City restaurant ever been closed for food-safety violations? Has it been taken to court? Or is it squeaky clean? In Philadelphia, it can be tough to tell. The city does post all inspection findings online, but they're not easy to find, and it can take a detective's zeal to decipher them. No A-B-C letter grades are posted out front, as in Los Angeles and New York. There's no consumer-friendly summary that is mandatory in New Jersey ("satisfactory/conditionally satisfactory")
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
The Philadelphia Rock 'n' Roll Half Marathon may not happen this year, for one very big reason: the pope. This fall's visit by Pope Francis will be his first to the United States and the first papal visit to Philadelphia since 1979. He will appear in conjunction with the World Meeting of Families, the world's largest gathering of Catholic families, which runs Sept. 22 to 27. The conference and his appearance overlap with what would be the 38th running of the race, which has traditionally been held on the third Sunday in September.
NEWS
January 9, 2015
ISSUE | END-OF-LIFE CARE Being there, praying for their journey It was 40-some years ago that I carried my 5-year-old son into Sacred Heart Home ("Divine Care in Hunting Park," Dec. 29). It was the light at the end of a four-year tunnel, and he had been discharged from two hospitals as terminally ill. But I cannot describe the loving care he was given at Sacred Heaert, and the support our family received until his death. And never a penny from us or friends or relatives: Can you imagine what that meant to us, with my being a stay-at-home mother of three other children?
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Penn might have founded Philadelphia, but it's Benjamin Franklin who gave the city a civic identity, a communal soul, and a future. In turn, Philadelphia made Benjamin Franklin, transforming him from a 17-year-old runaway indentured servant to a world-renowned innovator, diplomat, and scientist. His story is told in "Franklin's Spark," the eighth episode of Sam Katz's TV documentary series, Philadelphia: The Great Experiment , which airs 7:30 p.m. Thursday on 6ABC (WPVI-TV)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|