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ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1990 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
It's still Frank's, thanks. But because of the quiet sale of the 95-year- old local institution to an Elizabeth, N.J., bottler, Frank's Beverages are no longer made in Philadelphia. Frank's sodas, including cream, birch beer and the legendary Black Cherry Wishniak, are being manufactured and bottled these days in North Jersey, at the plant of C&C Cola. The grandson and great-grandson of founder Jacob Frank sold the business in August to C&C, owned by a fellow independent bottler who'd been wooing them for some time.
NEWS
January 5, 2010
STANDING IN line in the post office the other day, I was delighted at the response when two customers at the window were short of cash. Each time someone quickly supplied the 10 cents and 48 cents needed. And a lady asked an elderly woman (me) to go ahead of her in line! Did you know that on Nov. 26, Mayor Nutter participated in a reading from scripture in City Hall at the invitation of the American Bible Society? Indeed, the mayor read from Psalms and was followed by the president of the Westminster Theological Seminary and then by many others.
NEWS
February 3, 1991
Friday's front page brought news about two of Philadelphia's genial, if quite different, old gentlemen - G. Stockton Strawbridge and Peter Camiel. Mr. Strawbidge, 77, the Grand Old Man of Market Street East, was receiving the Powell Award for his civic accomplishments; Mr. Camiel, the one-time boss of the city's Democratic Party (but who is somewhat more famous as the man who proved Frank Rizzo a liar), had died at 81. The easy thing is to talk about Mr. Strawbridge's grand and glorious achievements and contrast them with Mr. Camiel's amusing if venal activities in trying to make the world a better place for, among others, the state's beer distributors in whose behalf he labored ceaselessly while a state senator.
NEWS
November 16, 1988 | By DAN ROTTENBERG
Over lunch the other day, the head of a high-profile Philadelphia company confided that he recently almost moved his headquarters from Center City to Bala Cynwyd. His company needs more space, he said - and if it's going to move, why not move across City Line, where taxes are lower, traffic is lighter, potholes are fewer and you can go for months on end without confronting a vagrant, hooker, a drug dealer or a mugger? My executive friend ultimately decided against such a move - but only because of its potential negative effects on his company's image.
SPORTS
November 19, 1996 | By Mayer Brandschain, FOR THE INQUIRER
Philadelphia won the intercity squash racquets matches for the Lockett Cup with 5-0 victories over Baltimore, Boston and New York yesterday at Chestnut Hill Academy. The Philadelphia team included Ben Desombre, Jim Masland, Rob Whitehouse, Rich Sheppard and Trip Davis. Desombre is the Philadelphia champion. Baltimore won the Class B title by defeating Philadelphia, 3-2.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2012
Fish 1234 Locust St. 215-545-9600 fishphilly.com Oyster House 1516 Sansom St. Philadelphia 215-567-7683 oysterhousephilly.com Route 6 600 N. Broad St. 215-391-4600 route6restaurant.com  
SPORTS
April 29, 1999 | By Doug Hadden, FOR THE INQUIRER
Overbrook's Chris Lange and Andy Thompson each won singles matches and teamed for a 4-and-3 win in the better-ball competition against Little Mill's Mike Hyland and Manasquan's Bob Housen to lead the Golf Association of Philadelphia to an 11-7 win over the New Jersey State Golf Association yesterday in the 37th annual Compher Cup at Metedeconk National. The results Singles matches Ron Vannelli, Metuchen, def. Jamie Slonis, Little Mill, 2 and 1; Robbie Gaglioti, Twin Brook, def. Jarrett Kling, Merion, 1 up; Oscar Mestre, Overbrook, def. Kevin Purcell, Forest Hill, 3 and 2; Chip Lutz, Berkshire, def. Bill Henry, Forsgate, 5 and 4; Harry Goett 3d, Ash Brook, def. Tom Shallow, Phila.
NEWS
December 11, 2007
REP. MARK Cohen has called for a "state-system college" for Philadelphia. In fact, Cheyney University, part of the state university system, has had an urban campus in Philadelphia for years, offering graduate degrees and certification programs in education. My understanding is that Cheyney would be happy to expand their course offerings in Philadelphia, perhaps even extending them to undergraduates. So there is a strong base on which to build. And, since Cheyney has an agreement with Community College of Philadelphia about accepting CCP students, there could be a smooth transition.
SPORTS
May 13, 2010 | The Inquirer Staff
Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, and Boston are the finalists to host the 2013 and 2014 Frozen Four hockey tournament, College Hockey News reported. The site in Philadelphia would be the Wachovia Center. The Frozen Four consists of the NCAA ice hockey semifinals and the championship game. St. Louis, which will host the NCAA West Regional in 2011, last hosted the Frozen Four in 2007, while Boston last hosted in 2004. Philadelphia, which has been in the mix before, and Pittsburgh have never hosted the event.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Has Ligeti's Atmosphères lost some of its shock value in the decades since its use in 2001: A Space Odyssey ? Maybe not. Amid our current orchestral odyssey of making programs as obsequious as possible, the classic from 1961 is regaining ground as a stroke of wondrous impertinence. British conductor Robin Ticciati made it so Friday night, even while constructing a Philadelphia Orchestra program in Verizon Hall of sly interplay among pieces. Another conductor might have aped the film, pairing it with Also sprach Zarathustra . Ticciati instead connected this Ligeti with an antecedent: Wagner.
NEWS
February 24, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
One by one, lawyers stepped onto the stage in a West Philadelphia community center and gave 30-second pitches on why they should be elected judge. Attendees of the 46th Ward meeting in the Enterprise Center last week enjoyed a buffet and listened to at least a dozen speeches, most fitting the same pattern: Name, brief mention of experience, pledge to improve the criminal justice system, name again. There are a lot of names to remember. Nearly 50 lawyers and six sitting judges have said they are running for Common Pleas and Municipal Court judgeships this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Opera Philadelphia's 2015-16 season is converging from more distant points than usual - or, possibly, ever. La Traviata (October) is imported from Bucharest. And though Andy: A Popera (September) hails from nearby neighborhoods, it's a product of the artistically distant FringeArts. The new Jennifer Higdon/Gene Scheer opera Cold Mountain will arrive in February from Santa Fe. With an epic Civil War-era production at the Academy of Music and such stars as Nathan Gunn and Isabel Leonard, it occupies the largest part of the season budget (approximately $2.4 million)
NEWS
February 16, 2015 | By Sarai A. Flores, Inquirer Staff Writer
Falaka Fattah woke up on her 83d birthday, Dec. 28, knowing what she wanted for Valentine's Day: A giant "I Love Philly" party. That's what brought 100 people to LOVE Park on Saturday for four hours of music, some speeches, and a shot of civic self-esteem. Fattah is the cocreator of the House of Umoja, an "urban boys town" that has been operating in West Philadelphia for more than four decades. Partnering with the Mayor's Office of Faith Based Initiatives, Fattah wanted to stage an event that focused on the positives of the City of Brotherly Love.
TRAVEL
February 16, 2015 | By Philippa J. Chaplin, Inquirer Travel Editor
A travel guide should be easily organized, so readers can quickly find what they're looking for. It should be written in a friendly tone, and provide background and supplemental information that might not be readily available at historic sites. And it should offer guidance on where to turn for present-day comforts. A new book by Larissa and Michael Milne - Philadelphia Liberty Trail: Trace the Path of America's Heritage - does all of that. The authors' names might sound familiar.
SPORTS
February 16, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
For someone who still pulls his high school yearbook out of a desk drawer at least three times a week and can still recite the 1967 all-Catholic basketball team, Wednesday was a fairly typical day. I signed up for trivia nights at St. Pius and Cardinal O'Hara along with friends from St. Dorothy's and St. Laurence and St. Anastasia. Later, an acquaintance from Sacred Heart asked me to take part in O'Hara's career day. That afternoon, I drove to Neumann-Goretti for a story on the nation's top-ranked girls' team, one whose coach went to St. Gabriel's and Archbishop Carroll.
NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Conductor Valery Gergiev probably had one of the more civilized receptions of his winter U.S. tour at Thursday's Philadelphia Orchestra concert. Pro-Ukrainian protesters were outside the Kimmel Center, having their say in the ongoing debate about Gergiev's support of Russian president Vladimir Putin, and inside, the concert was business as usual - as much as Gergiev's concerts are ever typical. He has long been the master of spontaneous combustion. Although Gergiev's own Mariinsky Orchestra often plays with world-class inspiration, it's sonically compromised by the substandard quality of instruments.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sam Katz lost three times as a Republican candidate for mayor of Philadelphia but then found success producing documentary films about the history of his hometown. That history now has Katz talking up Rudolph Blankenburg as one of the city's best mayors in the 20th century. Rudolph who? Blankenburg, a Keystone-Democrat, stunned the Philadelphia political machine in 1911 by defeating Republican George H. Earle Jr. by just 4,495 votes. Blankenburg pushed for reforms in his single term that Katz calls "hugely impactful.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Maybe it was the tactical hugs that decision-makers got from Rep. Bob Brady, Philadelphia's Democratic chairman. Or the op-ed touting the city by a bipartisan pair of former governors, Ed Rendell and Tom Ridge. Or Mayor Nutter's assurances that the city would be ready and the swift response from donors. Or perhaps Philadelphia's exceptional attributes - good transit, fine hotels and dining, world-class museums and parks, and a starring role in the formation of modern democracy - did the trick.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter signed mandatory paid sick leave into law Thursday, the same day City Council passed the legislation before a crowd of cheering workers. "The people who do not have paid sick leave are the people who need it the most," said Councilman William K. Greenlee, the bill's sponsor. "They're low-income workers, single mothers; they're college students or people just starting in the workforce. " In 90 days, businesses with 10 or more employees will be required to give workers at least one hour of paid sick leave for every 40 hours worked.
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