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ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1990 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
It's still Frank's, thanks. But because of the quiet sale of the 95-year- old local institution to an Elizabeth, N.J., bottler, Frank's Beverages are no longer made in Philadelphia. Frank's sodas, including cream, birch beer and the legendary Black Cherry Wishniak, are being manufactured and bottled these days in North Jersey, at the plant of C&C Cola. The grandson and great-grandson of founder Jacob Frank sold the business in August to C&C, owned by a fellow independent bottler who'd been wooing them for some time.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The scene at the Loft District's new Goldtex building couldn't have been more tranquil. Workers were wrapping up construction, patching cracks in the concrete and nestling shrubs into planters. A notice on the window of the retail space heralded the opening of a restaurant. Residents skipped down the front steps, off to their Center City jobs. It's hard to believe that only two years ago, the corner of 12th and Wood was Philadelphia's most notorious construction site. A dispute between powerful building-trades unions and two young, maverick developers escalated into an old-style, head-busting labor war that became a symbol of the divide between old Philadelphia and new Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2014 | By Sofiya Ballin, For The Inquirer
At 18, Andrew "Pop" Wansel made a promise to himself. Before he died, he'd work with both Kanye West and Alicia Keys. He did, all before his 30th birthday. The 26-year-old two-time Grammy-winning songwriter/producer sits in his new Old City apartment. His jovial demeanor warms the room, as his arms drape his plush couch. Wansel has just moved in, but the dining room table is topped with enough tableware to be the envy of the next issue of Good Housekeeping. He admits he wasn't the interior designer, but a painting of Jimi Hendrix, one of his earliest influences, at the head of the table reveals Wansel's touch.
SPORTS
August 24, 2014 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
Like to finish your race with a beer? You may want to add the Flying Fish 5K to your calendar. The race, which will be held on Sept. 6, begins at Flying Fish brewery in Somerdale, Camden County, and finishers 21 and over will get a beer at the finish line. The race is part of Great American Brewery Runs, a new series being put on by local breweries and Carl Ewald, who puts on the ODDyssey Half Marathon, a race held in Philadelphia in June. This race series started in May of this year with the Foxtrot 5K, which was held on the grounds of Sly Fox Brewing Company in Pottstown.
NEWS
January 5, 2010
STANDING IN line in the post office the other day, I was delighted at the response when two customers at the window were short of cash. Each time someone quickly supplied the 10 cents and 48 cents needed. And a lady asked an elderly woman (me) to go ahead of her in line! Did you know that on Nov. 26, Mayor Nutter participated in a reading from scripture in City Hall at the invitation of the American Bible Society? Indeed, the mayor read from Psalms and was followed by the president of the Westminster Theological Seminary and then by many others.
NEWS
February 3, 1991
Friday's front page brought news about two of Philadelphia's genial, if quite different, old gentlemen - G. Stockton Strawbridge and Peter Camiel. Mr. Strawbidge, 77, the Grand Old Man of Market Street East, was receiving the Powell Award for his civic accomplishments; Mr. Camiel, the one-time boss of the city's Democratic Party (but who is somewhat more famous as the man who proved Frank Rizzo a liar), had died at 81. The easy thing is to talk about Mr. Strawbridge's grand and glorious achievements and contrast them with Mr. Camiel's amusing if venal activities in trying to make the world a better place for, among others, the state's beer distributors in whose behalf he labored ceaselessly while a state senator.
NEWS
November 16, 1988 | By DAN ROTTENBERG
Over lunch the other day, the head of a high-profile Philadelphia company confided that he recently almost moved his headquarters from Center City to Bala Cynwyd. His company needs more space, he said - and if it's going to move, why not move across City Line, where taxes are lower, traffic is lighter, potholes are fewer and you can go for months on end without confronting a vagrant, hooker, a drug dealer or a mugger? My executive friend ultimately decided against such a move - but only because of its potential negative effects on his company's image.
SPORTS
November 19, 1996 | By Mayer Brandschain, FOR THE INQUIRER
Philadelphia won the intercity squash racquets matches for the Lockett Cup with 5-0 victories over Baltimore, Boston and New York yesterday at Chestnut Hill Academy. The Philadelphia team included Ben Desombre, Jim Masland, Rob Whitehouse, Rich Sheppard and Trip Davis. Desombre is the Philadelphia champion. Baltimore won the Class B title by defeating Philadelphia, 3-2.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2012
Fish 1234 Locust St. 215-545-9600 fishphilly.com Oyster House 1516 Sansom St. Philadelphia 215-567-7683 oysterhousephilly.com Route 6 600 N. Broad St. 215-391-4600 route6restaurant.com  
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BUSINESS
August 31, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Bar Association will host bar leaders from London, Beijing, Frankfurt, and other major cities at a conference from Sept. 10 to 13 aimed at showcasing the city's attributes as a crossroads of cultural and economic activity. Association chancellor William Fedullo said a focus of the World City Bar Leaders conference will be discussions on expanding legal representation for low-income people in civil litigation. Besides other legal discussions and cultural events, the conference will have a presentation by Kenneth Feinberg on responding to catastrophes.
NEWS
August 31, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fallout from the Philadelphia School District's dismal financial situation continues: 17 central-office employees were issued layoff notices Friday. Overall, 81 positions were eliminated, said Fernando Gallard, spokesman for the school system, but among those were 64 vacant jobs. The laid-off workers come mostly from the district's facilities and capital improvements offices. One employee from the Office of Family and Community Engagement was also issued a pink slip. Shedding the 81 jobs saves the district $5.4 million, Gallard said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The scene at the Loft District's new Goldtex building couldn't have been more tranquil. Workers were wrapping up construction, patching cracks in the concrete and nestling shrubs into planters. A notice on the window of the retail space heralded the opening of a restaurant. Residents skipped down the front steps, off to their Center City jobs. It's hard to believe that only two years ago, the corner of 12th and Wood was Philadelphia's most notorious construction site. A dispute between powerful building-trades unions and two young, maverick developers escalated into an old-style, head-busting labor war that became a symbol of the divide between old Philadelphia and new Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 29, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the summer of 1776, as 33-year-old Thomas Jefferson was writing the first draft of what became the Declaration of Independence, he solicited the thoughts of some colleagues. He was anxious to hear from Benjamin Franklin, for instance, because of the much older man's "more enlarged view of the subject. " Franklin made minor suggestions, which is why "we hold these truths to be self-evident," as opposed to holding them "sacred and undeniable. " Jefferson could write like a demon; Franklin was a devil of concision.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
            Hello there Monica was a junior at Tyler School of Art when she landed her first internship at Iris Creative. Iris' president, Beth, was so impressed that she brought her back the next year, then hired Monica after she graduated in 2011. Part of getting to know her boss was learning about Beth's family, including son James, then a rising junior enrolled in Navy ROTC while earning a mechanical engineering degree from Drexel. "She showed me a picture of him once, and I thought he was really cute," Monica said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2014 | By Sofiya Ballin, For The Inquirer
At 18, Andrew "Pop" Wansel made a promise to himself. Before he died, he'd work with both Kanye West and Alicia Keys. He did, all before his 30th birthday. The 26-year-old two-time Grammy-winning songwriter/producer sits in his new Old City apartment. His jovial demeanor warms the room, as his arms drape his plush couch. Wansel has just moved in, but the dining room table is topped with enough tableware to be the envy of the next issue of Good Housekeeping. He admits he wasn't the interior designer, but a painting of Jimi Hendrix, one of his earliest influences, at the head of the table reveals Wansel's touch.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Civic leaders have stepped in with a provisional plan to bring Philadelphia Theatre Company back from the brink of financial collapse, and, possibly, secure its long-term viability. The rescue plan, which ties new financial support to a re-organization of the company, was instigated by philanthropist Suzanne Roberts, mother of Comcast chairman Brian Roberts and a longtime patron of the company, and was fleshed out with help from Comcast executive vice president David L. Cohen. It calls for arts consultant Michael M. Kaiser, departing president of Washington's Kennedy Center, to develop a new business plan that is more detailed than the analysis he has already provided at the behest of the Roberts family.
SPORTS
August 26, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
ERNIE MONTELLA attended his first Philadelphia Athletics game in 1943. It was the start of a love affair that continues today. Montella was co-founder of the Philadelphia Athletics Historical Society, which closed its museum and gift shop in Hatboro in April of last year after a 15-year run. Former players were known to pop into the place from time to time. They'd also showed up at the society's annual breakfast to relive glory days with each other and fans. Sadly, said Montella, the players are dying off, or are simply too old to commit to personal appearances.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
It started over nothing - a police call about a maroon Buick blocking an intersection in North Philadelphia. Frustrated drivers leaned on their horns as traffic backed up around 22d Street and Columbia Avenue. When motorcycle officer Robert Wells arrived, he found Rush Bradford standing in the street, arguing through the driver's side window with his wife, Odessa Bradford. She pressed one foot on the gas and the other on the brake, making the engine roar. "Lady," the cop told her, "let the man park this car on the side.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
A child struggling for breath after a nerve-gas attack; a nurse attending to victims of barrel bombs; the tears of a Syrian doctor after a missile destroyed his hospital. Such are the images that haunt the days and nights of Rim Albezem, president of the Philadelphia chapter of the Syrian American Medical Society (SAMS), a humanitarian-aid group of medical professionals of Syrian descent. "People have the capacity to be very, very monstrous," Albezem said Tuesday, the same day Islamic State extremists released a video depicting the decapitation of American journalist James Foley, who was abducted in Syria two years ago. SAMS wants to be an antidote, said Albezem, 46. "It shows the capacity for good.
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