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SPORTS
June 2, 1998 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Since Richie Ashburn's death last September, numerous tributes have been paid to the man who graced the Philadelphia baseball scene as a player and broadcaster for 50 years. Yesterday, the Phillies announced a lasting memorial to Whitey in South Philadelphia: Richie Ashburn Fields. Work is under way on two baseball fields in Franklin D. Roosevelt Park near Veterans Stadium. One will be regulation-sized and one will conform to Little League dimensions. Completion is scheduled for late July.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1990 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
Spring training should have been under way by now. But baseball owners and players are still haggling over the kind of numbers that only an accountant could love. It's enough to make a fan long for a simpler time - the pre- skybox, pre-Phanavision, pre-Astroturf days when .220 hitters made less than the president. That kind of nostalgia is right up the archival alley of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, which will host an all-day seminar on Philadelphia baseball history on Saturday.
SPORTS
June 4, 2008 | By Jim Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia baseball fans could be getting their last up-close look at one of the game's all-time greats this week. The Cincinnati Reds hold an option on Ken Griffey Jr.'s contract for next season, but it's difficult to imagine them picking up his $16 million price tag. The Reds seem committed to integrating some of their nice young talent - we're seeing some of it this week in outfielder Jay Bruce - into the lineup, and Griffey, who will be...
SPORTS
April 3, 1996 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They never used to cheer when Darren Daulton caught the baseball. Heck, they never even noticed. The guy used to catch about 30,000 baseballs a year - sometimes in your average Mitch Williams outing alone - and did he get any standing ovations back then? Not a one. But he trades in those shin guards for a real glove, and look what happens. Darren Daulton catches a baseball last night, and pandemonium breaks out. (Well, either that or an attack of hypothermia.) It was 7:11 p.m. on that always-emotional occasion, "True Value Opening Day," the first Phillies opener ever sponsored by a hardware store.
NEWS
October 22, 2008 | By Derrick Nunnally INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the brink of a rare Phillies World Series, Vernon Murray, a retired minister in Langhorne, was reflecting yesterday on his long devotion to the team. "Maybe I can take a lot of punishment," mused Murray, 85, and a staunch fan since age 11. In his time, Murray, who grew up in Northeast Philadelphia and who was pastor at many churches across the region, has seen great players from Chuck Klein to Chase Utley and great disappointments, from 1950 to 1964 to 1977 to 1993. This is a man who knows Philadelphia baseball and stayed with it anyway.
NEWS
January 20, 2003 | By WILLIAM C. KASHATUS
AS COMMISSIONER Bud Selig and the Hall of Fame's 58 living members contemplate the reinstatement of Pete Rose this off-season, there is another former Phillies' first baseman who mustn't be forgotten by the reconstituted Veterans Committee when they cast their votes for baseball immortality. Richie Allen, the Phillies' first black superstar, is once again on the ballot. Allen forced Philadelphia baseball and its fans to come to terms with the racism that existed in this city in the 1960s.
NEWS
November 23, 1988 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raymond E. Kelly, 74, the stocky, cigar-smoking sportswriter who covered Philadelphia baseball for more than three decades and in later years was fondly known as the dean of American baseball writers, died yesterday at Nazareth Hospital. He lived in Winchester Park in the city's Northeast section. During a career of 50 years with the Philadelphia Bulletin, Mr. Kelly rose from a 16-year-old copy boy in the sports department to a veteran reporter who covered the Philadelphia Athletics from 1948 until 1955 and then the Phillies for much of the time until his 1979 retirement.
NEWS
April 2, 1996 | By William C. Kashatus
Dick Allen forced Philadelphia baseball and its fans to come to terms with the racism that existed in this city in the '60s and '70s. He may not have done it with the self-discipline or tact of Jackie Robinson, but he exemplified the emerging independence of major league baseball players as well as growing black consciousness. While his unexcused absences, candid opinions and pre-game beer drinking earned him some of the harshest press in Philadelphia's sport history, his tape-measure home runs and exceptional speed gained for him the tremendous admiration of fellow players - both black and white.
SPORTS
October 4, 2008 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
I've finally got it figured out. All that's required for baseball success in Philadelphia is for the economy to tank. Think about it. Who was baseball's best team when the Great Depression got rolling in 1929, 1930 and 1931? The Philadelphia Athletics. Connie Mack's clubs won the World Series in 1929 and 1930, then lost to St. Louis in the '31 Series. Then came the late 1970s, when inflation ran rampant, when there were gas shortages and long lines at gas stations, when interest rates rose like CC Sabathia's postseason ERA. Well, the Phillies took division titles in 1976, 1977 and 1978, winning a franchise-best 101 games in each of those first two seasons.
SPORTS
November 3, 2009 | By BROAD STREET BILLY (as told to DAN GERINGER), geringd@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
DURING THESE DARK days for diehards, the five Kosoy cousins - native Philadelphians who have gathered at Phillies spring training in Clearwater, Fla., for 20 years - remind us why we love our Fightin's and the game of baseball: AVRUM'S LEGACY: "Our family gathered every Sunday at my grandfather Avrum Kosoy's house on Columbia Avenue in what was once left field of Columbia Park, where the Philadelphia A's played from 1901 to 1908 before moving...
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SPORTS
January 5, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Surrounded by Fishtown's redbrick sea, Palmer Cemetery is an eerie urban island. Neighbors of the 250-year-old burial grounds insist spirits of the Revolutionary and Civil War veterans interred there sometimes prowl its weathered headstones and foreboding maples. Meanwhile, just a block away, another more tangible neighborhood ghost is stirring to life. At the cramped corner of Tulip and Palmer Streets, a long-abandoned Industrial Age building that, in terms of its baseball pedigree, may now be the most significant structure in Philadelphia is being converted into 30 apartments.
NEWS
October 28, 2012 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
They faced stronger teams, injury, and "performance-reducing drugs" in the World Series, but the grandfathers of summer fought their way into the playoffs. Then, in the quarterfinals of the 70+ tournament, the five players from the Philadelphia region joined their Tri-Valley Giants teammates to face the team that had beaten them, 24-3, three days earlier. With his team trailing the Sacramento Solons, 8-4, last Saturday, Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Ben Lerner began a rally with a single.
NEWS
July 9, 2012 | By john rooney
I HAD LEARNED at an early age that baseball was a business. So, when the nun asked our first-grade class how many boys wanted to see the Philadelphia A's win the World Series game being played that day in Shibe Park against Chicago, every boy's hand shot up in the air — except mine. Why did I want to see Chicago win? Because the Series would go an extra game and we would make more money. With the Phillies mired in last place, fans are criticizing the performance of the players and questioning decisions made by the organization.
SPORTS
July 21, 2011
  "Did I mention one of the ways a fringe pitcher can shorten his big-league career? Well, he can get his general manager arrested for disorderly conduct, which is what happened to Paul Owens after a 1981 cocktail-lounge altercation in Chicago . . . "After failing as an arbitrator during that stormy scene, I had to dash upstairs and write the story. "Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall make deadline. " - Bill Conlin   ON THE WAY to the 1988 Winter Olympics, the nation's sports editors arranged a splendid series of economical flights for us: Philadelphia to Chicago, Chicago to Spokane, Spokane to Calgary.
SPORTS
November 3, 2009 | By BROAD STREET BILLY (as told to DAN GERINGER), geringd@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
DURING THESE DARK days for diehards, the five Kosoy cousins - native Philadelphians who have gathered at Phillies spring training in Clearwater, Fla., for 20 years - remind us why we love our Fightin's and the game of baseball: AVRUM'S LEGACY: "Our family gathered every Sunday at my grandfather Avrum Kosoy's house on Columbia Avenue in what was once left field of Columbia Park, where the Philadelphia A's played from 1901 to 1908 before moving...
NEWS
October 22, 2008 | By Derrick Nunnally INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the brink of a rare Phillies World Series, Vernon Murray, a retired minister in Langhorne, was reflecting yesterday on his long devotion to the team. "Maybe I can take a lot of punishment," mused Murray, 85, and a staunch fan since age 11. In his time, Murray, who grew up in Northeast Philadelphia and who was pastor at many churches across the region, has seen great players from Chuck Klein to Chase Utley and great disappointments, from 1950 to 1964 to 1977 to 1993. This is a man who knows Philadelphia baseball and stayed with it anyway.
SPORTS
October 4, 2008 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
I've finally got it figured out. All that's required for baseball success in Philadelphia is for the economy to tank. Think about it. Who was baseball's best team when the Great Depression got rolling in 1929, 1930 and 1931? The Philadelphia Athletics. Connie Mack's clubs won the World Series in 1929 and 1930, then lost to St. Louis in the '31 Series. Then came the late 1970s, when inflation ran rampant, when there were gas shortages and long lines at gas stations, when interest rates rose like CC Sabathia's postseason ERA. Well, the Phillies took division titles in 1976, 1977 and 1978, winning a franchise-best 101 games in each of those first two seasons.
SPORTS
June 4, 2008 | By Jim Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia baseball fans could be getting their last up-close look at one of the game's all-time greats this week. The Cincinnati Reds hold an option on Ken Griffey Jr.'s contract for next season, but it's difficult to imagine them picking up his $16 million price tag. The Reds seem committed to integrating some of their nice young talent - we're seeing some of it this week in outfielder Jay Bruce - into the lineup, and Griffey, who will be...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2005 | By Eileen O'Donnell FOR THE INQUIRER
Baseball has been around since at least the 1840s, yet it's still a game largely reserved for men and boys. But a new area league plays with a twist. It's just for the girls. The Philadelphia Women's Baseball League, now in its second season, features three teams playing every Sunday during the summer. (On Saturdays there are exhibition games against local men's teams.) And while the players aren't professional, the action is still intense. There is no corporate sponsorship - players provide their own equipment and pay the field and umpires' fees - but the Phillies donate catching equipment, balls and bats.
NEWS
January 20, 2003 | By WILLIAM C. KASHATUS
AS COMMISSIONER Bud Selig and the Hall of Fame's 58 living members contemplate the reinstatement of Pete Rose this off-season, there is another former Phillies' first baseman who mustn't be forgotten by the reconstituted Veterans Committee when they cast their votes for baseball immortality. Richie Allen, the Phillies' first black superstar, is once again on the ballot. Allen forced Philadelphia baseball and its fans to come to terms with the racism that existed in this city in the 1960s.
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