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Philadelphia Flower Show

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NEWS
March 11, 2002 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society closed its eight-day Philadelphia Flower Show yesterday, estimating that 275,000 visitors attended. "It looks so far that we're pretty close to where we were two years ago," said Steve Maurer, public relations manager. Maurer said that last year produced an unusually low attendance of 210,000 "because we had three days of very bad weather forecasts" for the first days of the show. He estimated that the show produced net earnings of $1 million.
NEWS
March 10, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the final hour of the Philadelphia Flower Show, Barbie Carr soaked it in, knowing that winter was on its way out but that she still had a while to wait before her own flowers bloom. "I need this," she said. "I need the smell of the hyacinth before they pop up in my yard. It's like my drug. " Thousands got their own flower fix as the nine-day show came to an end Sunday. The crowd pushed the total attendance to 250,000, about 10 percent more than last year. Most noteworthy: visits among children and students doubled, according to organizers.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every Philadelphia Flower Show has a vibe that gets communicated in a one-word answer to this question: What'd you think of the show? Here's the word on 2014: Different . In random interviews at Friday's preview for members of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, which produces the show, visitors again and again described it that way. This show is, quite literally, different. The theme this year is ARTiculture, the nexus of art and horticulture, which is a complete departure from the themes of recent years.
NEWS
November 2, 2007 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Emilie Lapham's Wyndmoor garden is many gardens, really, each resembling an outdoor "room" on the same grand scale as her house. Eyes wide, we take in her Elizabethan parterres, the rocketing corn and okra, the orchard, wildflower meadow and foundation beds. But when Lapham meanders around her genial 41/2 acres two blocks from the city, her head is down. She's trolling - for acorns, bean pods and ivy leaves, pinecones, herbs, even rose thorns and cherry buds. Once found, they're dried, whittled down, and sliced up to make bracelets and brooches, necklaces and rings you'd swear belong in a window at Tiffany's.
NEWS
February 27, 2000 | By Adam L. Cataldo, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
You will never see a Delaware Valley white azalea blooming alongside a buddleia Black Knight in nature. And, while a white tiarella Spanish Cross and a pink Carefree Delight rose bloom at nearly the same time, they exist in two vastly different environments. "It's really frustrating for the public, because they see combinations of plants that don't normally happen in nature," said Laurel Allen of visitors to the Philadelphia Flower Show, which will begin next Sunday. Allen is a landscape designer and works for the J. Cugliotta Landscape Nursery in Southampton, which will have an exhibit in next month's show.
NEWS
March 8, 1993 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Everywhere you look these days, pale tufts of green are poking tentatively from the winter soil, as if they were the plant world's periscopes, peering hopefully for the first warm rays of spring. Inside Philadelphia's Civic Center, spring - maybe even full-bore summer - has already arrived. There, a six-acre slab of concrete has sprouted an entire globe's worth of gardens, from the golden marigolds of a formal Scottish "parterre" to a lush orchid paradise. From the daisies and the hyacinths to the violets and the - aaaaah!
LIVING
November 2, 2007 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Emilie Lapham's Wyndmoor garden is many gardens, really, each resembling an outdoor "room" on the same grand scale as her house. Eyes wide, we take in her Elizabethan parterres, the rocketing corn and okra, the orchard, wildflower meadow and foundation beds. But when Lapham meanders around her genial 4 1/2 acres two blocks from the city, her head is down. She's trolling - for acorns, bean pods and ivy leaves, pinecones, herbs, even rose thorns and cherry buds. Once found, they're dried, whittled down, and sliced up to make bracelets and brooches, necklaces and rings you'd swear belong in a window at Tiffany's.
NEWS
March 11, 1992 | By Lucinda Fleeson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The garden is the place of last retreat, an oasis of calm sought for solace and comfort, a reminder of the wisdom of nature. But who would know? For busy people with complicated lives, dual incomes, long hours, demanding children and taxing exercise regimes, the fact that the sun goes down before they get home is a big inconvenience. "People are working more now, and maybe going to the gym in the evening. By the time they get home late at night, the garden is closed up," said John Martin, chairman of the department of ornamental horticulture and environmental design at Delaware Valley College in Doylestown.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1995 | By Laura Quinn, FOR THE INQUIRER
The end of winter first comes into sight from the top of the escalator. From there it's a short ride to spring and that first glimpse - more like a hallucination, really - of the Philadelphia Flower Show. Once on the exhibition floor at the Civic Center, you will always find the same heart-stopping profusion of color, the horticultural equivalent of a lavishly staged Italian opera. Spring in the real world never performs like this. But flowers and gardens are never the whole of this world-famous event.
NEWS
March 2, 1995 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / PAUL HU
Bob LaBold of LeRoy's Flowers & Gifts Inc., a resident of Hatboro, Pa., works on a display for the Philadelphia Flower Show. The show will run Sunday through March 12 at the Convention Center.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jeanne Ray Willig, 92, a retired state administrator and dedicated gardener, died Thursday, May 14, at Lankenau Hospital of complications from a stroke. A longtime resident of Lower Merion, Mrs. Willig was born in Wyomissing, Pa., and moved with her family as a teenager to Philadelphia. She graduated from Olney High School, where she edited the student newspaper. She worked for years alongside her high school sweetheart and, later, husband, Paul Willig, at the family delicatessen, Paul & Irv's, in Brewerytown.
NEWS
March 14, 2015
ISSUE | FLOWER CHILD Studied approach As the manager of Campus Philly's Open Arts program, I was thrilled that the Philadelphia Flower Show saw student attendance double ("Time to break it all down," March 9). This year marked the first time Campus Philly was able to promote the show through its Open Arts program. Open Arts offers free membership to students at Campus Philly's 31 partner colleges and universities, supported by foundation and corporate sponsors. Open Arts' promotion of the Flower Show included a campaign promoting the event's student ticket rate; recruitment of on-campus student ambassadors to attend the Flower Show and promote it through social media; and a college night at the show.
NEWS
March 10, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the final hour of the Philadelphia Flower Show, Barbie Carr soaked it in, knowing that winter was on its way out but that she still had a while to wait before her own flowers bloom. "I need this," she said. "I need the smell of the hyacinth before they pop up in my yard. It's like my drug. " Thousands got their own flower fix as the nine-day show came to an end Sunday. The crowd pushed the total attendance to 250,000, about 10 percent more than last year. Most noteworthy: visits among children and students doubled, according to organizers.
NEWS
March 7, 2015 | By Anthony R. Wood and Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writers
Like the winter of 2014-15 itself, Thursday's snow was a late arrival. But for the region's commuters - and almost anyone else who had to go anywhere - this was a case of better never than late. By the time the snow tapered off late in the day, close to a foot had fallen in parts of the region, by far the biggest snowfall of a strange winter in which March has behaved like January. The storm's most disruptive element probably was its timing. Rain and sleet changed to heavy snow right before the peak morning commute.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | BY BOB STEWART, Daily News Staff Writer stewarr@phillynews.com,215-854-4890
A REGIONAL rail power failure left local travelers scrambling for another way home yesterday. "I'll give you a cannoli for a ride home," said Maryanne Lalli of Bristol, Bucks County. She scored a free loaf of bread from one of the shops in Reading Terminal Market because the loaf was a little bit crushed. Lalli, her husband and his parents made their way to the Philadelphia Flower Show at the Pennsylvania Convention Center because they had a day off thanks to the snow. "We figured it would be less crowded than the weekend," she said.
FOOD
March 6, 2015 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
YORK TOWNSHIP, Pa. - Steve and Julie Groff were living the life. Son of a third-generation dairy farmer, Steve was a successful orthopedic surgeon. Trained as a nurse, Julie was a stay-at-home mom to their three kids and manager of the 77-acre, century-old farm they'd bought in 2000. Together, they were raising Standardbred horses and Black Angus cattle, and exploring future business uses of their farm. Then, in October 2011, tragedy struck. Steve had taken his new Cannondale road bike out for an inaugural spin in Glen Rock, 20 miles from the York County farm, when he was hit from behind by a car being driven at 45 m.p.h.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Flower Show opened to the public Saturday, and while it wasn't exactly Disney World at the Convention Center, it was darned close in some corners. The 2015 theme - "Celebrate the Movies," with an emphasis on Disney - appears to be speaking to families in a way that past shows have not. Many more children were in evidence throughout the day, especially little girls with endless love for princesses. "This is really cool," said Kate Abbey, 11, of East Lyme, Conn., who was scheduled to compete in a gymnastics meet elsewhere in the Convention Center on Sunday but came to Philadelphia a day early, with her mother, Karen, to take in the Flower Show.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I HAVE A FAVOR to ask of the union members who've been picketing the Pennsylvania Convention Center: Leave the Philadelphia Flower Show alone. As in for real, guys. If you're planning to disrupt the show the way some members of the Metropolitan Regional Council of Carpenters disrupted the Philadelphia Auto Show on Feb. 7 - don't argue they didn't; we're not idiots - please just don't. Don't give a hard time to attendees, especially the sweet grannies arriving by bus, dressed in Alfred Dunner and comfy taupe shoes with Velco tabs.
NEWS
March 1, 2015 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
This year, with a "Celebrate the Movies" theme, the Philadelphia Flower Show is a sensory indulgence: the smell of popcorn, the sight of famous cinematic kisses on a giant screen, and sounds as varied as Tarzan's tinny call of the wild and the soaring score of Gone With the Wind. The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, the show's producer, had a private preview Friday for its members, who can be tough critics. But a dozen random interviews on Friday produced a long list of "likes" and one - mild - complaint about a seating shortage inside the show, which runs at the Convention Center from Saturday through next weekend.
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