CollectionsPhiladelphia Gas Works
IN THE NEWS

Philadelphia Gas Works

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 23, 2001
Philadelphia Gas Works is preparing to ask Philadelphians to invest $65 million, through rate increases. The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission is opposed to that increase, as I imagine, are most of PGW's customers. Philadelphians pay more than enough for their service already. In minority communities especially, every available resource already goes to the essentials of life, such as utilities. The cost of fuel has risen, true, but stewardship of resources already available must be examined.
NEWS
July 30, 2010 | By Marcia Gelbart, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's a homecoming in the works for Doug Oliver. Mayor Nutter's spokesman since the 2008 inauguration, Oliver is expected soon to announce that he is leaving the administration for a senior-level job with the Philadelphia Gas Works - where he worked for more than three years before the mayor took office. Oliver would not comment Thursday except to say, "I'm serving as the mayor's press secretary. If there is something to say, there will be an announcement. " Oliver, who is paid about $114,000 a year, oversees a five-person staff.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
City Council's leadership on Monday drove a spike into the proposed $1.86 billion sale of Philadelphia Gas Works without bringing the matter to a vote, apparently killing a signature effort by Mayor Nutter to reduce the city's pension-fund deficit. Council President Darrell L. Clarke said Council would not hold hearings on the proposal to sell PGW to UIL Holdings Corp. of New Haven, Conn. Nutter billed the sale as a way to divest the city of a burdensome asset and raise money for its underfunded pensions.
NEWS
November 15, 1989 | By Idris M. Diaz, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Gas Commission yesterday approved several management changes that consultants say could save the Philadelphia Gas Works as much as $6.5 million in annual operating expenses when fully implemented. The changes include requirements that PGW reduce some of its insurance costs, improve its inventory management and reduce the time between meter reading and billing. The changes were approved unanimously in response to a detailed audit of the city-owned utility's operations that was performed by Schumaker & Co., a Michigan-based consulting firm.
NEWS
April 19, 1995
There's a radio ad on the air featuring a homeowner who's switching to oil heat - mainly because he can't even get his gas company on the telephone. It's obvious the man's supposed to be one of the half-million long- suffering customers of the city-owned Philadelphia Gas Works (PGW), even though the utility isn't named. PGW: a godsend to competitors. The utility is best known for dismal customer service and snafus. For months, it sent gas bills to homes that were destroyed in a gas explosion.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The city is moving forward to hire a team of advisers to help it sell Philadelphia Gas Works, but already City Hall turf battles are breaking out about who should pay the costs. A week after the city requested proposals from financial advisers to guide it through a sale of PGW, it issued a request for law firms last Monday to bid on a broad range of work related to the potential $1.85 billion divestiture. Later, the city will hire a broker to manage the sale process and review proposals.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1994 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Faced with a utility where a third of the bills are not paid on time, City Finance Director Ben Hayllar confirmed yesterday that he had initiated a "long overdue" review of the troubled Philadelphia Gas Works. Hayllar said that the team looking into the city-owned gas works included representatives of the city water department, which, like the gas utility, is strained financially because its customers are not paying on time - if they pay at all. PGW said that past-due bills amounted to $187 million at the end of July, about a third of annual revenue.
NEWS
December 5, 1995 | By Jerry W. Byrd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At 10 a.m. Thursday, city police and employees of Philadelphia Gas Works knocked down the door of a North Ninth Street rowhouse and shut off gas to the furnace, stove and hot-water heater. The tenant, virtually housebound with severe asthma and owing PGW more than $8,000, said she spent the weekend in an upstairs room, warming her seven children with an electric space heater. She asked that her name not be used. The specifics of the case are in conflict. The 28-year-old woman said one of the utility's employees, acting on a medical certification from her doctor, had restored the service a week earlier, around Thanksgiving Day. But PGW spokesman Kevin Boyle disagreed.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2005 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An arctic chill had enveloped Western Pennsylvania in January 1976 when Sophia Easer's body was found in her house in the Pittsburgh suburb of Munhall. She had huddled beneath a rug, trying vainly to escape the subzero temperatures. Easer, 82, froze to death in an unheated home. Two weeks earlier, the local utility had shut off her gas because of unpaid bills. Easer's death spurred the state Public Utility Commission to adopt strict limits on cold-weather shutoffs. But this winter, one key restriction - that the PUC itself approve any winter shutoff - became the latest casualty of the troubles at Philadelphia Gas Works.
BUSINESS
March 26, 1995 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In early 1993, Phoenix Management Services, the turnaround company now running the city-owned Philadelphia Gas Works, undertook a similar rescue attempt of a Kensington manufacturer of sheet-metal products. Six months later, Phoenix abruptly quit, lawsuits were filed, and the Billy Penn Co. went into a tailspin beneath the mounting weight of its debt. It ceased operations in April, putting 100 out of work and leaving the founder's family financially ruined. Phoenix Management chief E. Talbot Briddell, whose firm was appointed three months ago to run the beleaguered gas works, said Phoenix made a valiant attempt to salvage Billy Penn.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 12, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Doug Oliver, the former spokesman for Mayor Nutter and Philadelphia Gas Works, has joined Peco Energy Co. as its director of communications. Oliver, 41, was senior vice president for communications at PGW before stepping down to run for mayor in 2015. After the Democratic primary, he returned to the city-owned utility as a senior leader for external affairs and marketing and corporate communications. Before working for PGW, Oliver served as the Nutter administration's press secretary as a spokesman for the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
Philadelphia landlords urged a federal judge Tuesday to nullify all outstanding gas liens linked to deadbeat tenants, a move PGW said could drastically alter its business and increase the bills of customers in good standing. Lawyers for five landlords asked a federal judge to include all city landlords in his March ruling, which declared that Philadelphia Gas Works' manner of placing liens on rental properties for debts owed by tenants is unconstitutional. U.S. District Judge J. Curtis Joyner ruled in March that landlords did not receive due process when the city-owned PGW failed to provide sufficient notice that their tenants were behind in payments, and that landlords would be held liable.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Maeetta Hardy did not have the resources to replace the furnace of the Germantown house where her family has lived for nearly four decades. "God knows that stove was old," she said. So Hardy welcomed a Philadelphia Gas Works contractor who recently installed an efficient, new gas furnace and hot-water system in her 116-year-old house, at no charge. "I wished I had the money to fix the things, but I don't," said Hardy. Hardy, 69, is among about 2,100 PGW low-income customers who received weatherization and efficiency improvements in the last year.
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Emily Babay, STAFF WRITER
Investigators are asking for help finding a man who stole jewelry from a 96-year-old woman in East Mount Airy by pretending to be a utility worker. Police on Tuesday released surveillance footage of the suspect, who got into the woman's home on the 6900 block of Crittenden Street on July 8 by saying he worked for Philadelphia Gas Works. The man told the woman that a gas leak contaminated a water line in the street, and the source of the leak needed to be turned off inside her home, police said.
NEWS
July 1, 2016
AFTER EIGHT YEARS of Michael Nutter, Philadelphia seems to be returning to a strong-mayor form of government. That's the way it is supposed to be. The mayor as the pre-eminent power in City Hall was an idea written into the City Charter more than 60 years ago. Unlike what is in the U.S. Constitution, the legislative branch and the executive branch were not supposed to be co-equal. The mayor was given the tools to rule. Unfortunately, as Nutter discovered, you still need to get City Council to provide the votes for your agenda, and he never mastered that trick.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
Philadelphia Gas Works will raise rates about 85 cents a month per customer over the next two years for the "limited purpose" of recovering $11.4 million it spent on infrastructure improvements last year. The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission approved the increase to PGW's distribution system improvement charge on Thursday, allowing the city utility to recoup money it spent on pipeline replacements but was unable to collect through its existing improvement surcharge. "While there is no good time to raise rates, PGW has established that the need to do so for a limited purpose is compelling," Commissioners Gladys M. Brown and Robert F. Powelson said in a joint statement.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Six local schools have formed a consortium to train students for more than 600 jobs that are expected to be needed in the coming years involving work on underground gas utility systems. Drexel University, Community College of Philadelphia, Delaware County Community College, Bucks County Community College, Camden County College, and Montgomery County Community College on Monday announced the formation of the Collegiate Consortium for Workforce and Economic Development, a nonprofit to teach the skills necessary to work in the natural-gas distribution industry.
NEWS
May 28, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
James J. Matour, 91, of East Falls, a World War II veteran and a retired executive with the Philadelphia Gas Works, died Monday, May 23, of heart failure at home. Mr. Matour grew up in Germantown. He graduated second in his class at Simon Gratz High School in 1942 and entered what is now Drexel University to major in mechanical engineering. In 1943, he interrupted his studies to enlist in the Army Air Corps. He was a B-17 bomber pilot, and flew 19 bombing missions over Nazi Germany in 1944 and 1945.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Gas Works shut off Ruth Mathieu-Alce's service 14 months ago, after PGW workers discovered a suspicious device on the gas meter at her Lawncrest home. PGW said the power converter tampered with the meter by emitting a magnetic force that caused it to dramatically underreport fuel usage. Mathieu-Alce proclaimed her innocence and filed a complaint with the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission. On Thursday, the PUC upheld an administrative law judge's finding that PGW had failed to prove that the power adapter caused her meter to run slowly.
NEWS
March 22, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
A federal judge has ruled in favor of several landlords who were dunned by Philadelphia Gas Works for money owed by their deadbeat tenants, declaring the utility's system of placing liens on landlords' properties to be unconstitutional. U.S. District Judge J. Curtis Joyner, in a summary judgment posted Friday afternoon, ruled that landlords' property interests "are clearly being unconstitutionally compromised" by PGW's collection process. The landlords sued in 2014, arguing that PGW's practice of slapping liens on rental properties with little or no notification leaves property owners scant recourse to defend themselves or to pressure their tenants to pay. In some cases, the tenants are long gone, and the landlords are left holding the bag for unpaid gas bills on top of unpaid rent.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|