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Philadelphia International Records

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NEWS
September 13, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BOBBY MARTIN was known as the "Grandaddy of R&B and soul," which meant he was the grandaddy of the Philadelphia Sound. Bobby worked with Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff, founders of Philadelphia International Records, to arrange and produce some of the greatest hits of the 1960s and '70s, as well as with some of the legendary musicians of that era. Robert L. "Bobby" Martin died last Friday. He was 82 and had been living in Hollywood, Calif., since 1980. "He was the greatest arranger," Gamble and Huff said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
A BIG BLAST of Philly's past, a couple of high-profile duds and more buzz-worthy album releases from the "four corners of the earth" grab our ears this week. A LANDMARK DATE: In just its first year out of the gate, backed by the music giant CBS, Philadelphia International Records had already scored a handful of hit singles, including Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes' "I Miss You," the O'Jays' "Backstabbers" and Billy Paul's "Me and Mrs. Jones. " But most of the men and women toiling at CBS's "Black Rock" HQ in New York and at the music giant's 21 branch offices hadn't really connected with these talents.
NEWS
June 10, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
'Gamble-Huff-Bell Music. " The first two names listed on the sign above the doorway at the Philadelphia International Records offices at 309 S. Broad St. are those most closely associated with the sophisticated soul music that became universally known as "The Sound of Philadelphia" in the late 1960s and early 1970s. But there were more than two major players writing the Philadelphia chapter in the great American soul-music history books. Along with Philadelphia International Records owners Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff, there was also Thom Bell, the producer, arranger, and songwriter known for the delectably sweet music he made with the Delfonics and the Stylistics.
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
The developer Carl E. Dranoff is partnering with Los Angeles-based SBE Entertainment Group to build a 47-story, mixed-use luxury boutique hotel and condominium tower at Broad and Spruce Streets, across from the Kimmel Center, for more than $200 million. The 422,838-square-foot SLS International, which Dranoff said would be Pennsylvania's "tallest structure built for residential use," is being designed by New York-based architecture firm Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, whose chairman, A. Eugene Kohn, is a Philadelphia native.
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | By John F. Morrison, Daily News Staff Writer
Who was that sweet lady passing out the Watchtower at 30th Street Station? And who would dare not take a copy from so earnest and charming a devotee of the faith? It was a devotion to the Jehovah's Witnesses that on many days led Ruby Gamble to hike from Stenton Avenue to City Hall with other witnesses, buttonholing passers-by and delivering their message of hope. Then she'd track down possible converts at the train station and other venues that might offer up interested people - or at least the curious.
NEWS
September 13, 2011 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, farrs@phillynews.com 215-854-4225
FORMER Gamble and Huff recording artist Archie Bell, of Archie Bell and the Drells, claims that Philadelphia International Records is tightening up on his royalties and keeping everything outta sight. In a lawsuit filed recently in Texas federal court, Bell, a Houston resident, claims that he was "induced" into signing a contract with Gamble and Huff years ago. Bell doesn't detail how he was "induced," but he claims that after signing, the record company didn't give him all the royalties he was owed, according to the lawsuit, which was first reported by Courthouse News Service.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1997 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of spectators seated inside a concert hall at the Convention Center one night last week swayed to the music and lip-synched the words to a Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes' hit being performed on stage: If you don't know me by now, you will never, never, never know me. Oooooouuu. That just may be Bernie Wilson's greatest fear. As Harold Melvin's Blue Notes stepped and sang the legendary 1970s-era "If You Don't Know Me By Now," a band of protesters demonstrated on the street on behalf of three men who say they immortalized the ballad.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Introduced as interior designer for the 152-room SLS LUX Philadelphia Hotel, the iconic Phillipe Starck found it easy to strike the right chord with his audience of city movers and shakers. Turning to Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff, the Frenchman thanked the recording impresarios for giving him "the kind of music that has allowed me to make good projects. " "This is my opportunity," Starck said of his first Philadelphia project, "to be able to pay my debt to you and your music," to which he listens as he designs.
NEWS
September 8, 2012 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carl Gamble, 65, of East Mount Airy, brother of famed Philadelphia music producer Kenny Gamble, died Sunday, Aug. 26, at his home after a long battle with cancer. Mr. Gamble worked as head of security for his brother's label, Philadelphia International Records, and wrote several songs, including "We All Got a Mission" and "False Faces" for the singer Billy Paul. Known as "Beans," Mr. Gamble was described by his family as a great teller of jokes and stories. "He was my brother, my friend, and he will really be missed," said Kenny Gamble, founder of Universal Cos., a community activist organization.
NEWS
February 22, 2010 | By STEPHANIE FARR, farrs@phillynews.com 215-854-4225
The Sound of Philadelphia was one of alarm yesterday when a fire, which broke out at Philadelphia International Records, was later determined by officials to be "suspicious. " "It's a shocker that someone might want to do this purposefully," said Chuck Gamble, executive vice president of Philadelphia International Records. "Especially given what the Sound of Philadelphia means not only to people in this city, but around the world. " Fire broke out at 7:28 a.m. in the building on Broad and Spruce streets - where legends such as Patti LaBelle, Teddy Pendergrass and Michael Jackson have recorded.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
SOUL SINGER Joe Simon ("Drowning in the Sea of Love"), jazz bassist Gerald Robert Veasley and WDAS radio star Patty Jackson will be honored by Philadelphia International Records and the Phillies on Friday night at Citizens Bank Park. The ceremony, starting at 6:30 p.m., before the Phils beat the Diamondbacks, is part of the 13th annual Phillies African American Heritage Celebration presented by The Sound of Philadelphia, in honor of Black Music Month. Legendary music producers Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff will present the honorees with the Phillies Gamble & Huff Community Partnership Award.
NEWS
May 5, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Barbara Daniel-Cox, 71, of Mount Airy, an educator, event producer, and political consultant, died Sunday, April 24, of a heart attack while shopping in Philadelphia. A 1962 graduate of West Philadelphia High School, she earned a bachelor of science degree in secondary education from Cheyney University and a master's degree in education from Antioch University. Ms. Daniel-Cox worked at various times as executive director of the Mayor's Commission for Women, director of education for the Philadelphia Urban League, director of consultation and education for Hall-Mercer Community Mental Health Center, and human relations specialist and teacher for the Philadelphia School District.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Life as we know it may have stopped during Winter Storm Jonas, but not for the Wilma Theater production of playwright Tom Stoppard's new work, The Hard Problem , or for its most striking cast member, saxophonist Michael Pedicin. The tall, bald, tan Pedicin marched down snowy Broad Street for weekend evening performances and Sunday's matinee. As he's done since Jan. 6, he appeared on stage, playing as scenes changed and characters considered their quandaries. "I'm one of those crazy people who enjoy snow in the city," Pedicin said between performances.
NEWS
November 9, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Back when the Latham was the Latham - the place to be - back when presidents and starlets strolled through the marble lobby, Joe Broderick was always there to open the door. He was hired as a doorman, but from the start, Broderick was always something closer to a concierge. Before all the big joints came to town, you had to stay at the Latham Hotel and you had to ask for Joe. Joe would take care of you. Whatever the situation. Restaurant reservations. Tickets to the latest show. Tickets to an Eagles game.
NEWS
June 25, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
FINALLY, THERE may be life once again at the old Royal Theater on South Street near 16th, vacant and mostly neglected for more than 40 years. But the new life will come only after the planned demolition of the original building. The Royal was built in 1919 in the classical-revival style by architect Frank E. Hahn and opened in 1920 as one of the first movie theaters for Philadelphia's black residents. It also was an important performance venue for such musical talents as Fats Waller and Bessie Smith.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Introduced as interior designer for the 152-room SLS LUX Philadelphia Hotel, the iconic Phillipe Starck found it easy to strike the right chord with his audience of city movers and shakers. Turning to Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff, the Frenchman thanked the recording impresarios for giving him "the kind of music that has allowed me to make good projects. " "This is my opportunity," Starck said of his first Philadelphia project, "to be able to pay my debt to you and your music," to which he listens as he designs.
NEWS
February 13, 2015
AMONG THOSE who took in the touring production of "Motown The Musical" when it played the Academy of Music last month was Kenny Gamble , who, along with Leon Huff and Thom Bell , made the Philadelphia International Records label a music powerhouse in the 1970s. So, it was pretty much a no-brainer to ask Gamble about a "Motown"-style musical based on PIR's prodigious catalog of soul and R&B hits, universally tagged "The Sound of Philadelphia. " We are happy to report that Gamble answered in the affirmative.
NEWS
August 17, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard T. Genovese Sr., 78, of Hatfield, a longtime musician here and elsewhere, died Thursday, July 24, of a brain disorder at his home. Born in South Philadelphia, he graduated from Southern High School in 1954 and from the Curtis Institute of Music in 1957. Mr. Genovese played three instruments: tenor trombone, bass trombone, and the tuba. He performed at venues and theaters in Philadelphia, casinos in Atlantic City, and on Broadway in New York. At various times, he performed with vocalists Luciano Pavarotti, Placido Domingo, and Andrea Bocelli.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
HEY, "Wake Up Everybody. " Sony Music Entertainment is about to put another major push behind the classic "Sound of Philadelphia. " And the timing couldn't be better, as the architects of our lush soul, pop, jazz and disco-fueled mega-music machine - Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff - gear up for their 50th anniversary as a production team this year. Sony has just announced a deal to market and distribute all the recordings made for Gamble and Huff's Philadelphia International Records post-1975, after PIR broke away from the (now Sony owned)
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
The developer Carl E. Dranoff is partnering with Los Angeles-based SBE Entertainment Group to build a 47-story, mixed-use luxury boutique hotel and condominium tower at Broad and Spruce Streets, across from the Kimmel Center, for more than $200 million. The 422,838-square-foot SLS International, which Dranoff said would be Pennsylvania's "tallest structure built for residential use," is being designed by New York-based architecture firm Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, whose chairman, A. Eugene Kohn, is a Philadelphia native.
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