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NEWS
July 24, 1991 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ron Javers, editor of Philadelphia Magazine for nine years, was fired yesterday in an apparent dispute with president D. Herbert Lipson over editorial authority. The dispute involved the publication's forthcoming annual Best of Philly issue, according to several sources. Javers, contacted at his Mount Airy home hours after the morning dismissal, sounded shaken on the phone. He declined to go into detail about the matter noting, "I have to get a job. " For the record he would only say: "The issue was editorial integrity.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Magazine editor Tom McGrath and Robert Huber, author of the controversial "Being White in Philly" cover story, faced their critics at a forum Monday night at the National Constitution Center. McGrath opened by saying he was sorry to anybody who was hurt by the article, because that was not his intent, but adding that he did not regret publishing the story in the March issue.     RELATED STORIES Magazine staffer: The only black person in the room Mayor goes after Philadelphia Magazine over race article     Huber told the packed auditorium of about 200 people that the purpose of the article was to explore "how white people relate to black people in the inner city, or don't relate to them.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Nutter issued a scathing letter Friday calling Philadelphia Magazine's controversial "Being White in Philly" cover story a "pathetic, uninformed essay," and asking the city Human Relations Commission to consider a rebuke of the magazine and the article's author. Tom McGrath, the magazine's editor, fired back, accusing Nutter of "sophomoric statements" that suggested he is "more interested in scoring political points than having a serious conversation about race. " Rue Landau, the commission's executive director, replied to Nutter: "The commissioners and I share the concerns of the mayor regarding the racial insensitivity and perpetuation of harmful stereotypes portrayed in the Philadelphia Magazine piece.
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the second night in a row, the editor of Philadelphia Magazine and the author of its "Being White in Philly" cover story willingly endured a barrage of criticism and some harsh accusations about the controversial piece. Round Two delivered more punishment for editor Tom McGrath and writer Robert Huber as they faced the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists at a meeting Tuesday at the offices of The Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News and philly.com. A vice president of the association accused both men of being racists.
NEWS
June 26, 2010 | By Dan Gross
P hiladelphia magazine on Thursday parted ways with editor Larry Platt, who was at its helm for nearly eight years. Platt's contract with the magazine is up in August, but after returning to work Thursday following shoulder surgery, he was informed that he would not stay on, we're told. Sources tell us the decision was largely due to Platt's history of inappropriate and unprofessional remarks and jokes to his employees that closely resembled the behavior of fictional "The Office" boss Michael Scott.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the second night in a row, the editor of Philadelphia Magazine and the author of its "Being White in Philly" cover story willingly endured a barrage of criticism and some harsh accusations about the controversial piece. Round Two delivered more punishment for editor Tom McGrath and writer Robert Huber as they faced the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists at a meeting Tuesday in Center City. A vice president of the association accused both men of being racists. They were subjected to mockery from some of the questioners and threatened with a boycott of the magazine's advertisers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2008 | By SHAUN BRADY For the Daily News
THE PATH that led to Benjamin Wallace's new book investigating "the longest-running mystery in the modern wine world" began when Wallace attempted a piece of his own skullduggery, a trick very dear to any writer's heart: to have a bit of recreation paid for by his bosses. "I was kind of a foodie at the time, but I wasn't a wine guy," Wallace recalled after a recent book signing at the Free Library of Philadelphia's central branch. It was 2000, and he was working as a writer at Philadelphia magazine, when he decided he wanted to know more about wine and enrolled in a class.
NEWS
February 11, 2015 | Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Helen Gym is no stranger to speaking before elected officials - sometimes rather loudly. Now, she is vying for a seat at their table. Gym, a Democrat, announced her candidacy for a City Council at-large seat at a lively rally Monday at the Ethical Society on Rittenhouse Square, where she focused mostly on education. A former elementary-school teacher, she has become a fiery advocate for public education funding and a frequent critic of city policies surrounding it. Gym, 47, the mother of three children in Philadelphia public magnet schools, entered the race with the endorsement of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, which has pledged to donate the maximum $11,500.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | BY HOWARD GENSLER, Daily News Staff Writer gensleh@phillynews.com, 215-854-5678
THE CALENDAR may have said "spring" a month ago, but what really kicks it off in Philadelphia - aside from Phillies opening day - is the Rittenhouse Row Spring Festival, which will once again take over Center City west of Broad, this Saturday from noon till 5 p.m. More than 100 booths will line Walnut Street, from Broad to 19th streets, and feature samplings from some of the city's top restaurants, in addition to Rittenhouse Row merchants, art,...
NEWS
April 18, 2015
ISSUE | FRAT CASE Getting it wrong hurts real victims Michael Smerconish was far too focused on the immediate and localized effect of the misreporting and misrepresentation in the now-discredited Rolling Stone account of a fraternity rape ("Red flags on piece were there," April 12). The larger tragedy here is the pall of doubt and disbelief the magazine cast over actual victims of campus rape. In fact, testosterone and alcohol-fueled fraternities occupied by man-child Neanderthals raised on Internet porn offer a perfect breeding ground for abusive behavior.
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
She was "Our Gal in Paris. " That's how Rubye Graham was billed on the front page of The Inquirer for her reviews of top fashion designers during the 1960s and early '70s. Rubye Graham Hennessy, as she was later known, was tasked with making the newspaper's fashion coverage more exciting. She arrived in 1959, and by 1966 - well, this is how Philadelphia Magazine described her entrance to a Paris restaurant packed with the elite of haute couture: " Everyone will be at Maxim's.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
SO MUCH ABOUT the Penn State Kappa Delta Rho fraternity case is depressing. There's the secret 144-member Facebook page with photos of naked and half-naked passed-out women, some in sexual poses that cops describe as "graphic" and "appalling. " Dubbed "2.0," the page is not to be confused with its first Facebook iteration, "Covert Business Operations," which was taken down when a victim who was the subject of a nude photo complained. It's chilling that these young men so lacked empathy that the only thing they learned from her pain and humiliation was to honor her request, wait a bit, then start back up again.
NEWS
March 4, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
LT. JOYCE CRAIG, who earned the tragic distinction of becoming Philly's first female firefighter to die on duty, will be posthumously honored for bravery by the Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations. Craig is one of 10 people whom the commission will celebrate as "everyday heroes" who have advanced social equality and justice in Philadelphia. The other award recipients are: * Bishop Dwayne Royster and People Organized to Witness, Empower and Rebuild (POWER), a multiracial interfaith coalition dedicated to pushing for social change.
NEWS
February 11, 2015 | Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Helen Gym is no stranger to speaking before elected officials - sometimes rather loudly. Now, she is vying for a seat at their table. Gym, a Democrat, announced her candidacy for a City Council at-large seat at a lively rally Monday at the Ethical Society on Rittenhouse Square, where she focused mostly on education. A former elementary-school teacher, she has become a fiery advocate for public education funding and a frequent critic of city policies surrounding it. Gym, 47, the mother of three children in Philadelphia public magnet schools, entered the race with the endorsement of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, which has pledged to donate the maximum $11,500.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
An Inquirer poll on pot set off the first "flip-flop" claim in Philadelphia's 2015 mayoral campaign. James F. Kenney, who resigned from City Council last week and declared his candidacy for mayor on Wednesday, successfully pushed legislation last year to decriminalize the penalties for possession of less than 30 grams of marijuana. Former District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham, another Democrat in the May 19 primary, on Tuesday said she supported "decriminalization of possessions of small amounts of marijuana for personal use. " Kenney's campaign pounced within minutes of seeing the story, pointing to a lengthy interview with Abraham published Jan. 5 on Philadelphia Magazine's blog, Citified.
NEWS
January 13, 2015 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Michael Nutter is not given to sentimentality. Ask Philadelphia's mayor to dwell a bit on his waning time in office, and there is no wistful Barbara Walters moment. Just a steely "We have work to do. " "I'm quite aware of the calender," he says, brushing aside any hope of reflection, "but we serve until the last day. " The last day is still a ways off, a year to be exact, but the distance is deceptive. His influence, real or perceived, is dissipating rapidly as others anticipate his replacement from among a gathering field of mayoral candidates.
NEWS
January 7, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just a few days after one candidate for Philadelphia mayor dropped out of the race, another emerged. Doug Oliver, a Philadelphia Gas Works spokesman and former press secretary for Mayor Nutter, said Monday that he was quitting his PGW job and jumping into the mayor's race as a Democrat. He plans an official announcement for early February. Oliver's decision, first reported by   Philadelphia Magazine, comes on the heels of Terry Gillen's announcement that she would no longer seek the office.
NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joyce Carol Oates has a point. The eminent writer was on Twitter Wednesday, discussing the political demonstrations throughout the country this year. She tweeted: "Critics of 'social media' need to acknowledge how, for all its flaws, this is a revolutionary new consciousness. " That's no writerly exaggeration. In a tumultuous year, much of the tumult was relayed, focused, stoked, and distributed through media channels other than newspapers, radio, TV, or film. From Hong Kong to Ferguson, from Mexico City to Philadelphia, social media repeatedly were harnessed to inform, create groups that shared goals and values, express outrage, solidarity, and aspiration, and organize protests.
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