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Philadelphia Magazine

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NEWS
July 24, 1991 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ron Javers, editor of Philadelphia Magazine for nine years, was fired yesterday in an apparent dispute with president D. Herbert Lipson over editorial authority. The dispute involved the publication's forthcoming annual Best of Philly issue, according to several sources. Javers, contacted at his Mount Airy home hours after the morning dismissal, sounded shaken on the phone. He declined to go into detail about the matter noting, "I have to get a job. " For the record he would only say: "The issue was editorial integrity.
NEWS
October 2, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
I'm not crazy about journalists analyzing journalists. Most of the real world doesn't care about which newspaper is falling apart (pretty much all of them) or which reporter did something dumb (all of us at one point or another). Philly is full of people and issues that desperately need the attention of the shrinking Fourth Estate. For example, 186,000 Philadelphians live in deep poverty, according to an Inquirer examination of recent census data. Those are the kinds of stories that should enrage us, that we should be focusing on. But sometimes something comes along that's bigger than one incident or place.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Magazine editor Tom McGrath and Robert Huber, author of the controversial "Being White in Philly" cover story, faced their critics at a forum Monday night at the National Constitution Center. McGrath opened by saying he was sorry to anybody who was hurt by the article, because that was not his intent, but adding that he did not regret publishing the story in the March issue.     RELATED STORIES Magazine staffer: The only black person in the room Mayor goes after Philadelphia Magazine over race article     Huber told the packed auditorium of about 200 people that the purpose of the article was to explore "how white people relate to black people in the inner city, or don't relate to them.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Nutter issued a scathing letter Friday calling Philadelphia Magazine's controversial "Being White in Philly" cover story a "pathetic, uninformed essay," and asking the city Human Relations Commission to consider a rebuke of the magazine and the article's author. Tom McGrath, the magazine's editor, fired back, accusing Nutter of "sophomoric statements" that suggested he is "more interested in scoring political points than having a serious conversation about race. " Rue Landau, the commission's executive director, replied to Nutter: "The commissioners and I share the concerns of the mayor regarding the racial insensitivity and perpetuation of harmful stereotypes portrayed in the Philadelphia Magazine piece.
NEWS
June 26, 2010 | By Dan Gross
P hiladelphia magazine on Thursday parted ways with editor Larry Platt, who was at its helm for nearly eight years. Platt's contract with the magazine is up in August, but after returning to work Thursday following shoulder surgery, he was informed that he would not stay on, we're told. Sources tell us the decision was largely due to Platt's history of inappropriate and unprofessional remarks and jokes to his employees that closely resembled the behavior of fictional "The Office" boss Michael Scott.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the second night in a row, the editor of Philadelphia Magazine and the author of its "Being White in Philly" cover story willingly endured a barrage of criticism and some harsh accusations about the controversial piece. Round Two delivered more punishment for editor Tom McGrath and writer Robert Huber as they faced the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists at a meeting Tuesday in Center City. A vice president of the association accused both men of being racists. They were subjected to mockery from some of the questioners and threatened with a boycott of the magazine's advertisers.
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the second night in a row, the editor of Philadelphia Magazine and the author of its "Being White in Philly" cover story willingly endured a barrage of criticism and some harsh accusations about the controversial piece. Round Two delivered more punishment for editor Tom McGrath and writer Robert Huber as they faced the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists at a meeting Tuesday at the offices of The Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News and philly.com. A vice president of the association accused both men of being racists.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2008 | By SHAUN BRADY For the Daily News
THE PATH that led to Benjamin Wallace's new book investigating "the longest-running mystery in the modern wine world" began when Wallace attempted a piece of his own skullduggery, a trick very dear to any writer's heart: to have a bit of recreation paid for by his bosses. "I was kind of a foodie at the time, but I wasn't a wine guy," Wallace recalled after a recent book signing at the Free Library of Philadelphia's central branch. It was 2000, and he was working as a writer at Philadelphia magazine, when he decided he wanted to know more about wine and enrolled in a class.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 27, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
Hours after the FBI raided Bobby Henon's City Hall office, the councilman fired off a statement on Twitter. "Any seniors out there need a PA Senior Citizen Transit ID card?" he tweeted. "My office can help!" In the three weeks since, it has been more of the same, a string of business-as-usual posts about community cleanup days and free financial-planning courses that belie the trouble Henon seems to be in with federal authorities. The councilman has repeatedly refused to answer questions.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2016
The Free Library of Philadelphia said Mayor Kenney has appointed Maria Arias, Doug Carney, and Anuj Gupta to its board of trustees. Arias is vice president of diversity and inclusion at Comcast Corp. Carney, a registered architect, is the senior vice president for facilities, real estate, energy, design and construction at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Gupta is general manager of Reading Terminal Market. Daemion Counseling Center, a 45-year-old nonprofit mental-health agency in Berwyn, has named the following board members: Kenneth Chen, director of digital marketing at BTC, Wayne; Joseph Koebele, research analyst at West Capital Management, Philadelphia; Jean Hughes, senior producer-director at Vanguard Media Services, Malvern; and Emily Magee, supervisor of Flagship Services at the Vanguard Group, Malvern.
NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By Olivia Exstrum, Staff Writer
In a contest between the Philly cheesesteak and New York cheesecake, which comes out on top as the big cheese? In the NY/PA Food Fight, a competition that matched five classic Philadelphia foods with five New York City counterparts Tuesday, Philadelphia just barely came out on top. For many, it was a welcome and lighthearted respite from the drama and party turmoil of the first days of the Democratic National Convention. The event starred U.S. Reps. Brendan Boyle (D., Pa.) and Carolyn Maloney (D., N.Y.)
NEWS
July 14, 2016
The wholesale failure of SEPTA's new commuter railcars has been inconvenient, unsettling, and, to the extent transit officials cast it as the public's problem rather than theirs, exasperating. But it was not entirely unforeseeable. The tortuous process that led to SEPTA's star-crossed purchase of the 120 Hyundai Rotem cars now sidelined with structural flaws produced more warning signals than an active railroad crossing. To wit: SEPTA preliminarily awarded the quarter-billion-dollar contract to a Hyundai-led consortium in 2004 even though the agency's staff ranked the proposal last of four bids.
NEWS
July 13, 2016
LAST WEEKEND was a cesspool on social media. I was using Twitter and Facebook to keep up with local protests against police shootings that I feared would go bad, and some did - though not as bad as they could have. At one, participants were shouting extreme things like, "No justice till there are dead f---g police. " That's repulsive, especially in the wake of the assassination of five Dallas police officers after a peaceful Black Lives Matter protest. Then I started to get screenshots of ignorant posts on Facebook from people who are apparently Philadelphia police officers.
NEWS
June 22, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
A life celebration will be held Wednesday, June 22, for Walter R. Hertler, 74, of Bryn Mawr, a trailblazing Philadelphia restaurateur, who died Thursday, June 2, of cancer at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Known as "Wally," Mr. Hertler had a knack for anticipating where the city's next hot spot would be, and moved quickly to establish elegant bar-eateries that helped spawn Center City's "restaurant renaissance" in the 1970s. In 1976, he took an antique bar from a derelict tavern and installed it in a building at Fourth and Bainbridge Streets in Queen Village.
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Staff Writer
Has Philadelphia's famous "councilmanic prerogative" been used in Point Breeze to encourage construction of affordable housing, or to punish a political foe? That was the question a federal jury had to grapple with Tuesday in the first day of trial for a lawsuit developer Ori Feibush filed against City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson. Feibush, who lost the 2015 Democratic primary election for the Second District to Johnson, said his projects had been repeatedly stymied and opposed by Johnson and his staff.
NEWS
March 15, 2016 | By Jenice Armstrong
AS ANTON MOORE and Nakia Carr got out of a car at Hollywood and Morris Streets in South Philly on Friday night, gunshots rang out. "We heard 'pow, pow, pow.' I said, 'What the hell?' It was not even a half a block up the street," said Moore, 30, president and founder of Unity in the Community. Not that they were surprised, really. Gunshots are an all-too-familiar sound in that neighborhood. Two days earlier, they'd been there going door-to-door imploring parents to monitor their children and to ensure there were no illegal guns in their houses.
NEWS
March 2, 2016 | By Jason Nark, Staff Writer
THE THOUSAND or so hand-painted faces looking down from the buttery walls of the Palm restaurant are full of smiles, for the most part. Mr. T isn't happy, of course, and it's hard to tell how the collies (Dixie and Pumpkin) feel, but most faces are beaming, from Rob Lowe's brother, Chad, to former Eagles linebacker Dhani Jones and the actor Lorenzo Lamas, who played Lance Cumson on the 1980s TV show Falcon Crest . Chad who? Falcon what? Isn't Donnie Jones the Eagles' punter? That's been the problem lately at the Palm.
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