CollectionsPhiladelphia Orchestra
IN THE NEWS

Philadelphia Orchestra

FEATURED ARTICLES
LIVING
June 15, 2001 | By Diane Goldsmith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Ann and Bill Hozack bought it in 1996, Homewoods, their storied Chestnut Hill estate, was in a state of neglect, the gardens terribly overgrown. That they saw beyond the vines is evident in the refurbished grand Norman-style home whose serene backyard is now a frequent site for garden-party benefits. Two have been held there this spring, and tomorrow the Hozacks will host well over 150 guests for the Philadelphia Orchestra's tony "Toys for Big Boys" event. "It's a fabulous house.
NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
When you have an excellent clarinetist at your disposal, you send him out on stage with the Mozart concerto and crowds will swoon. But Ricardo Morales is no excellent clarinetist. He is a superlative one. For him on Thursday night, nothing less than the formidable   Weber Clarinet Concerto No. 1 would do, and the capacity audience roared. Christoph von Dohnányi was on the podium, and, rounding out the Philadelphia Orchestra program in Verizon Hall with Brahms and Beethoven, he won traditionalist hearts.
NEWS
May 23, 2006 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
JOSEPH C. LANZA, a Philadelphia Orchestra violinist since 1958, died of pneumonia early Saturday morning. He was 73. "His life was the orchestra," Roslyn, his wife of 53 years said. "He was totally committed and dedicated to music. " On Saturday evening, before the orchestra's final concert of the season, Bach's "Air on a G String" was performed in his honor, and his chair was left empty. Lanza held the title of assistant principal second violinist, and could prominently be seen playing with youthful excitement.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1986 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the months to come, the Delaware Valley's museums, cultural institutions and performing arts groups will be keying many of their activities to the 200th anniversary of the convention that met in this city in the hot summer of 1787 and produced what George Washington later called "that precious depository of American happiness, the Constitution of the United States. " Starting this month and continuing through 1987, there'll be exhibits and historical presentations, plays and parades, conferences and symposiums, lectures and ceremonies, culminating - but not ending - Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Yefim Bronfman was the soloist in Prokofiev's brashly entertaining Third Piano Concerto, whose energies enlivened the Philadelphia Orchestra program, under Charles Dutoit, last night at the Academy of Music. Bronfman, 34, and a frequent visitor to this orchestra, possesses that brilliance of tone and overall alacrity to make the most of its glittering timbres and escalations, while his command of the work's sonorities is impressively virile. There was much to admire in the keyboard's climbing, spiraling passagework - its perpetual fevers that can exhaust a player's busy wrist.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Though the Philadelphia Orchestra enjoys many blue-sky moments these days, Friday's start to the weekend's subscription series had an especially rosy sense of well-earned arrival. Its impromptu concert Wednesday at Verizon Hall that followed the cancellation of its Carnegie Hall opening was a roaring feel-good public relations success. And then on Friday, the orchestra was doing what it does best, with Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducting Mahler's heaven-bound Symphony No. 4 (with many saints populating the final movement)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1991 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Mozart anniversary - rather gruesomely celebrating his death - has affirmed the liveliness of the music and the evergreen difficulty and reward of its performance. The Philadelphia Orchestra, playing last night on the anniversary itself, made its observance objective. No poignant last notes or somber choral reminders of the composer's neglect touched this program. Instead, conductor Gary Bertini led two of the three last Symphonies after prefacing them with a youthful Divertimento that portrayed Mozart as young, prodigious and barely able to contain his prankish relationship with the Salzburg musicians who played his music.
NEWS
September 22, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
The gala is over, the contract strike was averted, the new music director Wolfgang Sawallisch approved and introduced before the hardly old maestro, Riccardo Muti, returned to start his penultimate season. For the Philadelphia Orchestra, it has been an exhausting week. Understandable, then, that there was a certain back-to-work quality at the Academy of Music last night when the orchestra opened its subscription series. Actually it felt like a tough-love session with Father Muti whisking rather tightly the belt in Prokofiev's Classical Symphony and Tchaikovsky's Fourth, stopping to hug his charges only in a magnetically sensitive reading of the Barber Violin Concerto.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Tides flow in the life of an orchestra, urged and repelled by the orbital force of conductors and the orchestra's schedule. The spring tides that surged with the Philadelphia Orchestra in the last two weeks gave way last night to a probably inevitable neap tide. Christoph Eschenbach, the Houston Symphony's conductor who made an unscheduled but impressive debut here last fall, was back to lead a program that traced interesting relationships from Mozart to Berg. The tides that had sent waves breaking over the audiences were subdued last night.
NEWS
December 20, 1986 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Folk art frequently produces the image of youth climbing stairs toward maturity, crossing a landing and hobbling down steps toward the grave. That image was much in mind yesterday as Gilbert Levine, in his local debut, led the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Academy of Music. The spirit of the musicmaking reached the landing early and hurried listeners toward a feeling of overwhelming decrepitude. For the first half-hour, the climb was invigorating. Levine led the local premiere of Jacob Druckman's Aureoles, a work which has become a classic while Philadelphia wasn't looking.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | BY SHAUN BRADY, For the Daily News
YOUNG ARTISTS often find themselves in a difficult transition after they finish school. Rife with creative energy and knowledge, they're also confronting real-world financial responsibilities. Talk about a creative buzzkill. The Leonore Annenberg Fellowship Fund for the Performing and Visual Arts alleviates some of those pressures. Named for the late philanthropist, the fellowship, now in its seventh year, partners with renowned arts organizations and institutions to award $50,000 a year for up to two years to exceptional young dancers, musicians, actors and visual artists as they segue into their professional lives as artists.
NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
When you have an excellent clarinetist at your disposal, you send him out on stage with the Mozart concerto and crowds will swoon. But Ricardo Morales is no excellent clarinetist. He is a superlative one. For him on Thursday night, nothing less than the formidable   Weber Clarinet Concerto No. 1 would do, and the capacity audience roared. Christoph von Dohnányi was on the podium, and, rounding out the Philadelphia Orchestra program in Verizon Hall with Brahms and Beethoven, he won traditionalist hearts.
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Darrell Roth Gordon, 87, of Marlton, who operated one of the first automobile dealerships in the region owned by a minority-group member, died Tuesday, March 25, after a lengthy illness. Mr. Gordon was born in Philadelphia to parents who had migrated to the United States from Guyana. He attended Central High School, where he graduated with honors. Mr. Gordon also attended the University of Pennsylvania, where there were only three other minorities in his graduating class, according to his daughter Laura.
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Willard S. Boothby Jr., 92, of Bryn Mawr and Jupiter, Fla., a respected leader in Philadelphia's business and philanthropic communities, died Saturday, March 22, of complications after a fall, at his Florida home. A Philadelphia native, Mr. Boothby was managing director of Paine Webber & Co., a stock brokerage and asset management firm, before retiring in the early 1990s. But he found time to take a leadership role in many local institutions, including as president of the Academy of Music and as a director of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 30, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
There's a whiff of desperation to the Philadelphia Orchestra's current campaign to save music with the help of visuals. The latest salvo, unveiled Thursday night, imported artist/filmmaker Tal Rosner, who projected video pastiches on tall hanging scrims of Miami, Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Los Angeles to roll along with the four movements of Britten's four "Sea Interludes. " Whether this sort of thing is an augmentation or a distraction is very much a personal call, and there are reasonable arguments to be made on both sides.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
If any composer can occupy a concert on his own, it should be Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Oddly, that didn't quite happen with Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia's Sunday outing at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater with esteemed Swiss guest conductor Matthias Bamert. Bamert's extensive discography includes relatively minor figures with famous last names - Leopold Mozart and Michael Haydn - which explains why his program began with the better-known Mozart's teenage Symphony No. 17 , which, unlike many works of his youth, doesn't hold up all that well.
NEWS
March 18, 2014
An obituary in Saturday's paper of Leonard Bogdanoff, 83, a violist with the Philadelphia Orchestra, misstated the date of death. Mr. Bogdanoff died Friday, March 14.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Leonard Bogdanoff, 83, of Elkins Park, a violist with the Philadelphia Orchestra for a half-century, died Friday, March 15, at his home. Colleagues said Mr. Bogdanoff personified the best qualities of the orchestra's old guard. "When I think of Leonard, I think of the kindness in dealing with all of the other members of the viola section. He was just very fair," said Pamela Faye, a substitute violist with the orchestra and a frequent stand partner of Mr. Bogdanoff's. "You can have people who can make or break a section, and he was one of the ones who gave a positive influence, sound-wise, stylistically, all of it. That was really an inspiration to me. " Retired orchestra member Louis Lanza, who as a second violinist sat not far from Mr. Bogdanoff, called him "a very steady player, very accurate, and just a wonderful musician.
NEWS
March 16, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Although perfectly congenial, the Philadelphia Orchestra's high-concept program was up around the ozone Thursday when the Fauré Requiem was preceded by a succession of composers that spanned three centuries and as many nationalities - for no clear reason. Not knowing the connecting thread isn't a bad thing: Such things can reveal themselves over time. Hitting so many musical bases, though, translated into less cumulative impact, despite superb performances under guest conductor Alain Altinoglu.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Sergeant Price, 90, of Bryn Mawr, a cultural leader and World War II veteran, died Saturday, Feb. 22, of cancer at his home. For 60 years, Mr. Price was president and executive director of the America-Italy Society of Philadelphia, a cross-cultural institution. Blessed with a knack for managing investments, he made sure the society was well enough endowed to offer the Italian lessons, films, lectures, art exhibits, and study tours abroad for which it was known. The society subsidized the Amerita Chamber Players, a subset of the Philadelphia Orchestra.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|