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LIVING
June 15, 2001 | By Diane Goldsmith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Ann and Bill Hozack bought it in 1996, Homewoods, their storied Chestnut Hill estate, was in a state of neglect, the gardens terribly overgrown. That they saw beyond the vines is evident in the refurbished grand Norman-style home whose serene backyard is now a frequent site for garden-party benefits. Two have been held there this spring, and tomorrow the Hozacks will host well over 150 guests for the Philadelphia Orchestra's tony "Toys for Big Boys" event. "It's a fabulous house.
NEWS
May 23, 2006 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
JOSEPH C. LANZA, a Philadelphia Orchestra violinist since 1958, died of pneumonia early Saturday morning. He was 73. "His life was the orchestra," Roslyn, his wife of 53 years said. "He was totally committed and dedicated to music. " On Saturday evening, before the orchestra's final concert of the season, Bach's "Air on a G String" was performed in his honor, and his chair was left empty. Lanza held the title of assistant principal second violinist, and could prominently be seen playing with youthful excitement.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1986 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the months to come, the Delaware Valley's museums, cultural institutions and performing arts groups will be keying many of their activities to the 200th anniversary of the convention that met in this city in the hot summer of 1787 and produced what George Washington later called "that precious depository of American happiness, the Constitution of the United States. " Starting this month and continuing through 1987, there'll be exhibits and historical presentations, plays and parades, conferences and symposiums, lectures and ceremonies, culminating - but not ending - Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Yefim Bronfman was the soloist in Prokofiev's brashly entertaining Third Piano Concerto, whose energies enlivened the Philadelphia Orchestra program, under Charles Dutoit, last night at the Academy of Music. Bronfman, 34, and a frequent visitor to this orchestra, possesses that brilliance of tone and overall alacrity to make the most of its glittering timbres and escalations, while his command of the work's sonorities is impressively virile. There was much to admire in the keyboard's climbing, spiraling passagework - its perpetual fevers that can exhaust a player's busy wrist.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1991 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Mozart anniversary - rather gruesomely celebrating his death - has affirmed the liveliness of the music and the evergreen difficulty and reward of its performance. The Philadelphia Orchestra, playing last night on the anniversary itself, made its observance objective. No poignant last notes or somber choral reminders of the composer's neglect touched this program. Instead, conductor Gary Bertini led two of the three last Symphonies after prefacing them with a youthful Divertimento that portrayed Mozart as young, prodigious and barely able to contain his prankish relationship with the Salzburg musicians who played his music.
NEWS
September 22, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
The gala is over, the contract strike was averted, the new music director Wolfgang Sawallisch approved and introduced before the hardly old maestro, Riccardo Muti, returned to start his penultimate season. For the Philadelphia Orchestra, it has been an exhausting week. Understandable, then, that there was a certain back-to-work quality at the Academy of Music last night when the orchestra opened its subscription series. Actually it felt like a tough-love session with Father Muti whisking rather tightly the belt in Prokofiev's Classical Symphony and Tchaikovsky's Fourth, stopping to hug his charges only in a magnetically sensitive reading of the Barber Violin Concerto.
NEWS
December 20, 1986 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Folk art frequently produces the image of youth climbing stairs toward maturity, crossing a landing and hobbling down steps toward the grave. That image was much in mind yesterday as Gilbert Levine, in his local debut, led the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Academy of Music. The spirit of the musicmaking reached the landing early and hurried listeners toward a feeling of overwhelming decrepitude. For the first half-hour, the climb was invigorating. Levine led the local premiere of Jacob Druckman's Aureoles, a work which has become a classic while Philadelphia wasn't looking.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1989 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
The power of a guest soloist is not to be underestimated. A pianist or violinist suffering an off-evening can cast a pall over the best of ensembles that lingers through the night. That was the case at the Academy of Music last night as the Philadelphia Orchestra and Riccardo Muti endured Andrei Gavrilov's account of the Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor. Although it rated enthusiastic rounds of applause from the audience, some observers may have noticed no Philadelphians on stage clapping or bumping their bows in approval, which is the norm after even modestly successful performances.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial service and concert have been set to honor former Philadelphia Orchestra principal cellist William Stokking, 81, of Medford. The service is to be at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, April 12, at the Unitarian Universalist Church, 401 Kings Highway N., Cherry Hill. The concert is to be at 3 p.m. Saturday, May 9, at Field Concert Hall of the Curtis Institute of Music, 1726 Locust St. His wife, Nancy, said both events are open to the public. Mr. Stokking, who retired from the orchestra in 2005, died Sunday, Dec. 14, 2014, at a Moorestown nursing home of complications from a stroke.
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dorothea Andes, 86, of Villanova and Haverford, an interior designer with a deft touch who used her creative talent to build a company and nurture numerous arts and civic organizations in the city, died Friday, March 6, after a long battle with cancer. Known lovingly to all who knew her as "Dottebob," she was the wife of prominent businessman and civic leader Charles L. Andes, who last served as chief executive officer of the Franklin Mint in Philadelphia. Charles Andes died in 2006.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Beethoven and Falla. Only one conductor would dare to pair such radically dissimilar composers with the Philadelphia Orchestra: the late Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos. Planned by him before his death last year, the program on Thursday fell to the orchestra's conductor in residence, Cristian Macelaru. He is as strong-minded as anyone standing before the orchestra this season and, overall, made the evening work in a manner hugely different from Frühbeck de Burgos'. Beethoven was represented by his least severe orchestral work, the Symphony No. 6 ("Pastoral")
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
'When all goes wrong . . . smile a lot. " Such was the advice that conductor Scott Terrell gave to the everyday people who stepped up to lead a Philadelphia Orchestra contingent Monday at the Reading Terminal Market. Orchestra players have performed pop-ups from Macau to the Comcast Center, and Monday morning word went out on the Internet that this one would be a "Conduct Us" program, where listeners could become participants and get a souvenir baton. No way the entire orchestra could fit at the northerly end of the crowded market, of course.
NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
For all of its reputed fabulousness, the Philadelphia Orchestra is also known for its winter contingency concerts. Most famously, Wolfgang Sawallisch once played Wagner on piano while weather-delayed orchestra musicians trickled in. On Thursday, music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin could not muster enough musicians for Vaughan Williams' Symphony No. 4 , so he substituted Ravel's Mother Goose Suite on four-hand piano with himself and none...
NEWS
March 7, 2015 | By Anthony R. Wood and Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writers
Like the winter of 2014-15 itself, Thursday's snow was a late arrival. But for the region's commuters - and almost anyone else who had to go anywhere - this was a case of better never than late. By the time the snow tapered off late in the day, close to a foot had fallen in parts of the region, by far the biggest snowfall of a strange winter in which March has behaved like January. The storm's most disruptive element probably was its timing. Rain and sleet changed to heavy snow right before the peak morning commute.
NEWS
March 4, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
If there was a certain energy in the air Monday night at the Kimmel Center, it wasn't only to be found in triumphant Verdi or euphoric Saint-Saëns. More than 400 students from the School District of Philadelphia's All-Philadelphia High School Music Festival performed onstage in Verizon Hall, even as officials continued their work behind the scenes to reinvigorate the program. The concert was a fond farewell to Don S. Liuzzi, the Philadelphia Orchestra timpanist who has been director of the All-City orchestra, as it is known, for the last decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
NEW YORK - Ever loyal, Yannick Nézet-Séguin maintains what looks like an undying commitment to the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra, whose 2006 appointment consolidated his international career. Now, as he moves among A-list orchestras (including one in Philadelphia), why does he stay with a second-tier Dutch ensemble? Answers have been abundant during his U.S. tour with the Rotterdam orchestra, which ended Sunday as part of Lincoln Center's Great Performers series. Due to weather-delayed flights from Chicago, some players arrived only minutes before concert time, but still played at a level that showed why the tour has won off-the-charts reviews.
NEWS
February 25, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
A leadership and administrative change in the School District of Philadelphia's venerable All City Music Festival could signal the start of the program's restoration. Project 440, the education group founded in 2006 by Philadelphia Orchestra assistant double bassist Joseph Conyers, is taking over management of the All City program from the School District. The legal aspects of the transfer may take months to complete, but a ceremonial handshake sealing the deal is planned on stage at this year's All City concert on Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Has Ligeti's Atmosphères lost some of its shock value in the decades since its use in 2001: A Space Odyssey ? Maybe not. Amid our current orchestral odyssey of making programs as obsequious as possible, the classic from 1961 is regaining ground as a stroke of wondrous impertinence. British conductor Robin Ticciati made it so Friday night, even while constructing a Philadelphia Orchestra program in Verizon Hall of sly interplay among pieces. Another conductor might have aped the film, pairing it with Also sprach Zarathustra . Ticciati instead connected this Ligeti with an antecedent: Wagner.
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