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LIVING
June 15, 2001 | By Diane Goldsmith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Ann and Bill Hozack bought it in 1996, Homewoods, their storied Chestnut Hill estate, was in a state of neglect, the gardens terribly overgrown. That they saw beyond the vines is evident in the refurbished grand Norman-style home whose serene backyard is now a frequent site for garden-party benefits. Two have been held there this spring, and tomorrow the Hozacks will host well over 150 guests for the Philadelphia Orchestra's tony "Toys for Big Boys" event. "It's a fabulous house.
NEWS
May 23, 2006 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
JOSEPH C. LANZA, a Philadelphia Orchestra violinist since 1958, died of pneumonia early Saturday morning. He was 73. "His life was the orchestra," Roslyn, his wife of 53 years said. "He was totally committed and dedicated to music. " On Saturday evening, before the orchestra's final concert of the season, Bach's "Air on a G String" was performed in his honor, and his chair was left empty. Lanza held the title of assistant principal second violinist, and could prominently be seen playing with youthful excitement.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1986 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the months to come, the Delaware Valley's museums, cultural institutions and performing arts groups will be keying many of their activities to the 200th anniversary of the convention that met in this city in the hot summer of 1787 and produced what George Washington later called "that precious depository of American happiness, the Constitution of the United States. " Starting this month and continuing through 1987, there'll be exhibits and historical presentations, plays and parades, conferences and symposiums, lectures and ceremonies, culminating - but not ending - Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Yefim Bronfman was the soloist in Prokofiev's brashly entertaining Third Piano Concerto, whose energies enlivened the Philadelphia Orchestra program, under Charles Dutoit, last night at the Academy of Music. Bronfman, 34, and a frequent visitor to this orchestra, possesses that brilliance of tone and overall alacrity to make the most of its glittering timbres and escalations, while his command of the work's sonorities is impressively virile. There was much to admire in the keyboard's climbing, spiraling passagework - its perpetual fevers that can exhaust a player's busy wrist.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1991 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Mozart anniversary - rather gruesomely celebrating his death - has affirmed the liveliness of the music and the evergreen difficulty and reward of its performance. The Philadelphia Orchestra, playing last night on the anniversary itself, made its observance objective. No poignant last notes or somber choral reminders of the composer's neglect touched this program. Instead, conductor Gary Bertini led two of the three last Symphonies after prefacing them with a youthful Divertimento that portrayed Mozart as young, prodigious and barely able to contain his prankish relationship with the Salzburg musicians who played his music.
NEWS
September 22, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
The gala is over, the contract strike was averted, the new music director Wolfgang Sawallisch approved and introduced before the hardly old maestro, Riccardo Muti, returned to start his penultimate season. For the Philadelphia Orchestra, it has been an exhausting week. Understandable, then, that there was a certain back-to-work quality at the Academy of Music last night when the orchestra opened its subscription series. Actually it felt like a tough-love session with Father Muti whisking rather tightly the belt in Prokofiev's Classical Symphony and Tchaikovsky's Fourth, stopping to hug his charges only in a magnetically sensitive reading of the Barber Violin Concerto.
NEWS
December 20, 1986 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Folk art frequently produces the image of youth climbing stairs toward maturity, crossing a landing and hobbling down steps toward the grave. That image was much in mind yesterday as Gilbert Levine, in his local debut, led the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Academy of Music. The spirit of the musicmaking reached the landing early and hurried listeners toward a feeling of overwhelming decrepitude. For the first half-hour, the climb was invigorating. Levine led the local premiere of Jacob Druckman's Aureoles, a work which has become a classic while Philadelphia wasn't looking.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1989 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
The power of a guest soloist is not to be underestimated. A pianist or violinist suffering an off-evening can cast a pall over the best of ensembles that lingers through the night. That was the case at the Academy of Music last night as the Philadelphia Orchestra and Riccardo Muti endured Andrei Gavrilov's account of the Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor. Although it rated enthusiastic rounds of applause from the audience, some observers may have noticed no Philadelphians on stage clapping or bumping their bows in approval, which is the norm after even modestly successful performances.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Orchestra will perform a free concert Tuesday at the Kimmel Center as part of the nationwide GivingTuesday campaign that seeks charitable contributions. Seating is general admission, and tickets may be reserved beginning at 8 a.m. Tuesday, at www.philorch.org . There will be holiday music in Commonwealth Plaza starting at 6 p.m., with opportunities to conduct the players. The Verizon Hall doors open at 7, and the 75-minute concert begins at 7:30. Music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin will lead the ensemble in seasonal favorites from Tchaikovsky, Leroy Anderson, and Brahms, plus works by Pulitzer Prize-winning Philadelphia composer Jennifer Higdon and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Percussion guru Alan Abel was the subject of what had to be the loudest 85th birthday concert in Philadelphia history on Sunday. But had it not been a bang-up occasion, something would have been seriously wrong. Indeed, the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society was out of its usual league at the Perelman Theater with this 21/2-hour lovefest of Abel's percussion disciples, ending with a battery of 12 in a Rolando Morales-Matos drumming showdown incongruously titled The Little Rhumba . All had their individual moments, and, as we know, once percussionists hit a groove, you never know when they'll stop - even Abel, whose contribution was on cowbell.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The fashion world has long popularized clothes that appear to be turned inside out. Why shouldn't the Philadelphia Orchestra do its own version of that every so often? How could that work? Dvorák's Symphony No. 8 was so significantly reimagined by guest conductor Jakub Hruša that you'd think the prevailing, mellifluous tradition of Wolfgang Sawallisch never existed. The music was a rougher ride but full of incident. Orchestral sonorities that are normally string-dominated shared the sound picture more equally with brass and winds.
NEWS
November 11, 2014 | By Daniel Webster, For The Inquirer
China's global economic expansion has been slow to include a matching rise in cultural institutions among its exports, but Friday brought a major step toward changing that when a youthful orchestra from Beijing played an internationally televised concert at the Kimmel Center. The concert by the NCPA Orchestra had special resonance here, because the Philadelphia Orchestra played in 1973 in a nation that had once put its musicians in coal mines and closed universities and conservatories but was cautiously peering over its cultural wall.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philip Scott Ward, 69, of Lansdale, a longtime television director, died Wednesday, Oct. 22, of brain cancer at his home. Born in Spencer, W.Va., he graduated from Spencer High School. Mr. Ward began his career in 1960 as a disc jockey in a small radio station in Spencer, where he worked with the country music singer and songwriter Tom T. Hall. While attending Marshall University in Huntington, W. Va., Mr. Ward was employed by WSAZ-TV in various positions before becoming a television director.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writer
John B. "Jack" Hagner, 83, of Bala Cynwyd, a longtime public accountant, died Monday, Oct. 20, of dementia at Symphony Square Assisted Living & Memory Care. His wife of 27 years, Mary Ellen Yuhas Hagner, said Mr. Hagner started suffering memory loss in 2011 and was diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia. In 2013, he was admitted to Symphony Square. Mr. Hagner worked as a public accountant for 41 years at Ratke, Miller, Hagner & Co. in Philadelphia. It was formerly known as Hagner & Co. after his grandfather and father, who founded the company during the 1930s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Enjoy spooktacular sounds and artistry, in your favorite costume, Saturday at the Philadelphia Orchestra's Halloween Fantastique with Cirque de la Symphonie at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts. The orchestra will perform 10 pieces including Danny Elfman's Batman movie theme. Other featured works include Adam Glaser's "March of the Little Goblins," French composer Hector Berlioz's "March to the Scaffold" from Symphonie Fantastique , and Rimsky-Korsakov's "Dance of the Tumblers" from The Snow Maiden . Cirque de la Symphonie will perform acrobatic dance, and kids are encouraged to come in their Halloween costumes.
NEWS
October 22, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Since the Philadelphia Orchestra exited bankruptcy more than two years ago, several key financial indicators have brightened. Obligations associated with the orchestra's Chapter 11 settlement have been paid off, income from concerts is growing nicely, and annual fund-raising is improving more than nicely. "It was really a remarkable year," board chairman Richard B. Worley said at Monday's annual meeting of the Philadelphia Orchestra Association at the Kimmel Center. As part of its recovery plan, the orchestra established a "bridge/recovery/transformation" fund, and fans have come to the rescue.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra was on much newish ground Thursday with familiar composer names but not familiar pieces, chief among them that woolly bear of a choral work, the Glagolitic Mass of Leos Janacek. I looked forward to seeing the facial reactions of the listeners around me to a piece so singular in the choral literature that you might not know what hit you. The piece is primitivistic yet modern, devotional yet secular, and so impulsive that even seasoned Janacek lovers are hard-pressed to know what comes next.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marc S. Lapayowker, 87, of Center City, a longtime radiologist and professor of radiology in the Philadelphia area, died Monday, Oct. 6, of renal failure at his home. Dr. Lapayowker joined the staff of Temple University Hospital in 1960 and remained there for 23 years. He became professor of radiology at Temple and also director of diagnostic radiology at Temple University Hospital. In 1983, Dr. Lapayowker left Temple to take a job as chairman of the department of radiology at Abington Memorial Hospital.
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