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LIVING
June 15, 2001 | By Diane Goldsmith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Ann and Bill Hozack bought it in 1996, Homewoods, their storied Chestnut Hill estate, was in a state of neglect, the gardens terribly overgrown. That they saw beyond the vines is evident in the refurbished grand Norman-style home whose serene backyard is now a frequent site for garden-party benefits. Two have been held there this spring, and tomorrow the Hozacks will host well over 150 guests for the Philadelphia Orchestra's tony "Toys for Big Boys" event. "It's a fabulous house.
NEWS
May 23, 2006 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
JOSEPH C. LANZA, a Philadelphia Orchestra violinist since 1958, died of pneumonia early Saturday morning. He was 73. "His life was the orchestra," Roslyn, his wife of 53 years said. "He was totally committed and dedicated to music. " On Saturday evening, before the orchestra's final concert of the season, Bach's "Air on a G String" was performed in his honor, and his chair was left empty. Lanza held the title of assistant principal second violinist, and could prominently be seen playing with youthful excitement.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1986 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the months to come, the Delaware Valley's museums, cultural institutions and performing arts groups will be keying many of their activities to the 200th anniversary of the convention that met in this city in the hot summer of 1787 and produced what George Washington later called "that precious depository of American happiness, the Constitution of the United States. " Starting this month and continuing through 1987, there'll be exhibits and historical presentations, plays and parades, conferences and symposiums, lectures and ceremonies, culminating - but not ending - Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Yefim Bronfman was the soloist in Prokofiev's brashly entertaining Third Piano Concerto, whose energies enlivened the Philadelphia Orchestra program, under Charles Dutoit, last night at the Academy of Music. Bronfman, 34, and a frequent visitor to this orchestra, possesses that brilliance of tone and overall alacrity to make the most of its glittering timbres and escalations, while his command of the work's sonorities is impressively virile. There was much to admire in the keyboard's climbing, spiraling passagework - its perpetual fevers that can exhaust a player's busy wrist.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1991 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Mozart anniversary - rather gruesomely celebrating his death - has affirmed the liveliness of the music and the evergreen difficulty and reward of its performance. The Philadelphia Orchestra, playing last night on the anniversary itself, made its observance objective. No poignant last notes or somber choral reminders of the composer's neglect touched this program. Instead, conductor Gary Bertini led two of the three last Symphonies after prefacing them with a youthful Divertimento that portrayed Mozart as young, prodigious and barely able to contain his prankish relationship with the Salzburg musicians who played his music.
NEWS
September 22, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
The gala is over, the contract strike was averted, the new music director Wolfgang Sawallisch approved and introduced before the hardly old maestro, Riccardo Muti, returned to start his penultimate season. For the Philadelphia Orchestra, it has been an exhausting week. Understandable, then, that there was a certain back-to-work quality at the Academy of Music last night when the orchestra opened its subscription series. Actually it felt like a tough-love session with Father Muti whisking rather tightly the belt in Prokofiev's Classical Symphony and Tchaikovsky's Fourth, stopping to hug his charges only in a magnetically sensitive reading of the Barber Violin Concerto.
NEWS
December 20, 1986 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Folk art frequently produces the image of youth climbing stairs toward maturity, crossing a landing and hobbling down steps toward the grave. That image was much in mind yesterday as Gilbert Levine, in his local debut, led the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Academy of Music. The spirit of the musicmaking reached the landing early and hurried listeners toward a feeling of overwhelming decrepitude. For the first half-hour, the climb was invigorating. Levine led the local premiere of Jacob Druckman's Aureoles, a work which has become a classic while Philadelphia wasn't looking.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1989 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
The power of a guest soloist is not to be underestimated. A pianist or violinist suffering an off-evening can cast a pall over the best of ensembles that lingers through the night. That was the case at the Academy of Music last night as the Philadelphia Orchestra and Riccardo Muti endured Andrei Gavrilov's account of the Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor. Although it rated enthusiastic rounds of applause from the audience, some observers may have noticed no Philadelphians on stage clapping or bumping their bows in approval, which is the norm after even modestly successful performances.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Tchaikovsky was unstoppable at the Philadelphia Orchestra's return Tuesday to the Mann Center for the Performing Arts in the annual 1812 Overture performance with fireworks, though the program was curtailed due to the violent thunderstorm that hit two hours before concert time. After an early-evening power failure, Peco restored the lights - lots of them, along with a trio of new video screens in the rear lawn - although only for a limited time, pending the rebooting necessary for repairs elsewhere in the area.
NEWS
June 25, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
ROME - Finding an opening act for the pope is no easy task. Organizers of Pope Francis' visit to Philadelphia announced Tuesday that the renowned Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli and the Colombian pop star Juanes, along with the Philadelphia Orchestra, will headline the Saturday free concert on the eve of Pope Francis' Mass on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in September. The pope - and as many as 1.5 million people - are expected to attend the Festival of Families performance on the last night of the World Meeting of Families, the Catholic Church's huge faith-and-families congress that week.
NEWS
June 24, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
He was born in South Philadelphia, married Franco-Russian royalty, and reigned for five decades as one of the great violists of the 20th century. Joseph de Pasquale, 95, died Monday, June 22. Mr. de Pasquale, of Merion, was principal violist of two of America's golden-age ensembles - the Boston Symphony Orchestra from 1947 to 1964, and then, sitting alongside three of his brothers, the Philadelphia Orchestra from 1964 until retirement in 1996. He is credited with raising the standard of viola playing so dramatically that it remade the instrument's image, said Curtis Institute of Music president Roberto Díaz, a one-time de Pasquale protégé.
NEWS
June 24, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HE WAS A South Philly kid who made good. Joseph de Pasquale set new standards for the viola, playing for the Boston Symphony and, more famously, for the Philadelphia Orchestra in a career of performing and teaching that began at age 15 and ended with his retirement in 1996. He died yesterday at the age of 95. He lived in Merion Station. Joseph and his brothers, three of whom would comprise the world-renowned De Pasquale String Quartet, were born in South Philadelphia with the sound of classical music ringing in their heads.
NEWS
June 20, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Neil Courtney, 82, of Center City, a double bass player with the Philadelphia Orchestra for 48 years and the "king of the double bass in Philadelphia," died Wednesday, June 17, at home after many years of declining health from heart disease. He joined the orchestra as a section player in 1962, and served as assistant principal double bassist from 1988 until his retirement in 2010. Mr. Courtney liked to compare the double bass' range to that of a baritone singer, but bemoaned its limited repertoire and listening public.
NEWS
June 16, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ethel F. Semser, 98, of Philadelphia, an international opera singer and linguist, died Thursday, June 4, of complications from pneumonia at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Born in 1917 and reared in Philadelphia, she was the daughter of Nathan Frey, a violist for the Philadelphia Orchestra. She graduated from Germantown High School and received a bachelor of arts degree from Temple University and a master of arts in foreign languages from the University of Pennsylvania. She also trained privately as an opera singer.
NEWS
June 6, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
AMSTERDAM - With its six tons of equipment, the Philadelphia Orchestra arrived for its Amsterdam concert on Thursday with success or failure dependent on one key person: not any musician, but an anonymous truck driver who maneuvered through streets the size of bike lanes to deliver the instruments to one of Europe's most majestic but problematic halls, the Royal Concertgebouw. "If Yannick [Nézet-Séguin] couldn't conduct the concert, Lio Kuokman would fill in. If a player gets sick, we have alternates.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
PARIS - There's nothing like a physical ordeal to bring people together. Literally. Holding hands with arms raised, almost like an opera bow, a trio of runners from the Philadelphia Orchestra crossed the finish line of Paris' Saint-Germain-en-Laye half-marathon Sunday morning. Though about 20 minutes behind the front runners, concertmaster David Kim, principal tuba Carol Jantsch, and substitute cellist Glenn Fischbach felt like winners, having run 13 miles from the Paris Zoo just beyond the Arc de Triumph to the famously grand Château de Saint-Germain en Laye - with some serious hills in between.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
VIENNA - "Yay! We're home!" said Philadelphia Orchestra cellist Yumi Kendall after a sound-check rehearsal at the Musikverein. Though 4,301 miles from Philadelphia, Vienna's famous hall was the launch site for so much now-standard orchestral repertoire, from Brahms to Bruckner to Mahler, that it can't help but feel like a home, even to those who've never performed here before, among them young assistant conductor Lio Kuokman: "I've seen this many...
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
DORTMUND, Germany - What is Yannick Nézet-Séguin doing on the back of a winged rhinoceros? And where is he expecting to go with such unconventional transportation? One possible answer in this poster image for his concerts here at the Konzerthaus Dortmund, in what used to be the heart of Germany's coal and steel industry, is that he's using his artistic frequent-flyer miles to ensure the Philadelphia Orchestra's success here. "I went to Yannick's first concert as chief conductor [in Philadelphia]
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