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LIVING
June 15, 2001 | By Diane Goldsmith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Ann and Bill Hozack bought it in 1996, Homewoods, their storied Chestnut Hill estate, was in a state of neglect, the gardens terribly overgrown. That they saw beyond the vines is evident in the refurbished grand Norman-style home whose serene backyard is now a frequent site for garden-party benefits. Two have been held there this spring, and tomorrow the Hozacks will host well over 150 guests for the Philadelphia Orchestra's tony "Toys for Big Boys" event. "It's a fabulous house.
NEWS
May 23, 2006 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
JOSEPH C. LANZA, a Philadelphia Orchestra violinist since 1958, died of pneumonia early Saturday morning. He was 73. "His life was the orchestra," Roslyn, his wife of 53 years said. "He was totally committed and dedicated to music. " On Saturday evening, before the orchestra's final concert of the season, Bach's "Air on a G String" was performed in his honor, and his chair was left empty. Lanza held the title of assistant principal second violinist, and could prominently be seen playing with youthful excitement.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1986 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the months to come, the Delaware Valley's museums, cultural institutions and performing arts groups will be keying many of their activities to the 200th anniversary of the convention that met in this city in the hot summer of 1787 and produced what George Washington later called "that precious depository of American happiness, the Constitution of the United States. " Starting this month and continuing through 1987, there'll be exhibits and historical presentations, plays and parades, conferences and symposiums, lectures and ceremonies, culminating - but not ending - Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Though the Philadelphia Orchestra enjoys many blue-sky moments these days, Friday's start to the weekend's subscription series had an especially rosy sense of well-earned arrival. Its impromptu concert Wednesday at Verizon Hall that followed the cancellation of its Carnegie Hall opening was a roaring feel-good public relations success. And then on Friday, the orchestra was doing what it does best, with Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducting Mahler's heaven-bound Symphony No. 4 (with many saints populating the final movement)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Yefim Bronfman was the soloist in Prokofiev's brashly entertaining Third Piano Concerto, whose energies enlivened the Philadelphia Orchestra program, under Charles Dutoit, last night at the Academy of Music. Bronfman, 34, and a frequent visitor to this orchestra, possesses that brilliance of tone and overall alacrity to make the most of its glittering timbres and escalations, while his command of the work's sonorities is impressively virile. There was much to admire in the keyboard's climbing, spiraling passagework - its perpetual fevers that can exhaust a player's busy wrist.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1991 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Mozart anniversary - rather gruesomely celebrating his death - has affirmed the liveliness of the music and the evergreen difficulty and reward of its performance. The Philadelphia Orchestra, playing last night on the anniversary itself, made its observance objective. No poignant last notes or somber choral reminders of the composer's neglect touched this program. Instead, conductor Gary Bertini led two of the three last Symphonies after prefacing them with a youthful Divertimento that portrayed Mozart as young, prodigious and barely able to contain his prankish relationship with the Salzburg musicians who played his music.
NEWS
September 22, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
The gala is over, the contract strike was averted, the new music director Wolfgang Sawallisch approved and introduced before the hardly old maestro, Riccardo Muti, returned to start his penultimate season. For the Philadelphia Orchestra, it has been an exhausting week. Understandable, then, that there was a certain back-to-work quality at the Academy of Music last night when the orchestra opened its subscription series. Actually it felt like a tough-love session with Father Muti whisking rather tightly the belt in Prokofiev's Classical Symphony and Tchaikovsky's Fourth, stopping to hug his charges only in a magnetically sensitive reading of the Barber Violin Concerto.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Tides flow in the life of an orchestra, urged and repelled by the orbital force of conductors and the orchestra's schedule. The spring tides that surged with the Philadelphia Orchestra in the last two weeks gave way last night to a probably inevitable neap tide. Christoph Eschenbach, the Houston Symphony's conductor who made an unscheduled but impressive debut here last fall, was back to lead a program that traced interesting relationships from Mozart to Berg. The tides that had sent waves breaking over the audiences were subdued last night.
NEWS
December 20, 1986 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Folk art frequently produces the image of youth climbing stairs toward maturity, crossing a landing and hobbling down steps toward the grave. That image was much in mind yesterday as Gilbert Levine, in his local debut, led the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Academy of Music. The spirit of the musicmaking reached the landing early and hurried listeners toward a feeling of overwhelming decrepitude. For the first half-hour, the climb was invigorating. Levine led the local premiere of Jacob Druckman's Aureoles, a work which has become a classic while Philadelphia wasn't looking.
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BUSINESS
July 29, 2014
Citizen Diplomacy International of Philadelphia, formerly the International Visitors Council of Philadelphia, a public/private partnership with the U.S. Department of State and the City of Philadelphia, has named Thomas Jennings , a partner at Hill Wallack L.L.P., Yardley, chairman. He replaces John W. Goldschmidt Jr. , a partner at Ference & Associates L.L.C., who will remain on the executive committee.    Other directors include: Christopher S. D'Angelo , partner at Montgomery McCracken Walker & Rhodes L.L.P., Philadelphia; Michael A. Schwartz , partner at Pepper Hamilton L.L.P., Philadelphia; and Gabriella Vacca, vice president, system engineering, at Comcast Corp., Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
It used to be we would go to the orchestra to avoid commercialism. Now, audiences are paying good money to be pitched to. Playing excerpts from the scores of Pixar films on two nights in Verizon Hall last week, the Philadelphia Orchestra set aside its charge of letting the public in on something interesting, overlooked, or artistically important. Instead, the ensemble played for two hours beneath a screen showing clips from Toy Story ( 1 , 2 and 3 ), Monsters Inc ., Cars ( 1 and 2 )
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Though Philadelphia seems not to lack classical music concerts or educational opportunities for young artists, Taiwanese pianist Ching-Yun Hu came home to her Academy House apartment one recent summer, wanted to hear live music, and discovered there wasn't any. "I had just come back from my own festival in Taipei," she said. "People were so excited about it, and I thought, 'Why not do something similar here?' " Now, in these sweaty late-July weeks, the festival she founded, the Philadelphia Young Pianist Academy, is in its second year and occupies the Curtis Institute's Field Concert Hall with a series of five concerts Saturday through Aug. 2. They are the most prominent manifestations of an intensive program of master classes and lectures.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first thing to know about composer and pianist Uri Caine is that he started young in the Philadelphia jazz scene, learning from masters like saxophonists Bootsie Barnes and the late Grover Washington Jr. Caine, now 58, went on to develop modernist classical chops and do daring reinterpretations of classical works from Wagner, Beethoven, and Bach, becoming almost a genre unto himself. The world premiere of Caine's The Passion of Octavius Catto on Saturday night at the Mann Center was in some ways a summary of the composer's eclectic career as well as a celebration of an epic life.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Jazz pianist/composer Uri Caine's many years gone from his native Philadelphia are melting away, into a kind of music he wasn't taught at the University of Pennsylvania, and in places his colleagues don't typically navigate. His The Passion of Octavius Catto , a jazz/gospel oratorio about the martyred Philadelphia civil rights leader, will have its world premiere Saturday at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts. It is being rehearsed at the historic St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church in what's called in hip-hop circles "the O-Zone" (Olney)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
With his Noel Coward-esque wit and solid command of the Philadelphia Orchestra, guest conductor Bramwell Tovey is always a delight to encounter in special, not-entirely-classical occasions that could easily fall apart under a lesser personality. But on Friday at the Mann Center, Tovey conducted music that didn't require (or receive) his usual witty introductions: Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 . It can be as problematic as it is great, yet here was thoroughly accomplished, with excitement arising from a strong musical foundation, cultivated opinions on how the music should go, and a keen ability to make that happen.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
THERE MAY BE some grumbling in the ranks of the Philadelphia Orchestra tonight, Ben Folds anticipates, when the sophisticated singer-songwriter/pianist, professorial talent judge ("The Sing-Off") and fledgling concerto composer meets up with our legendary symphony. "The Ben Folds Orchestral Experience" at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts will feature excerpts from Folds' new (first!) concerto, a big bunch of his pop gems - and one of the best and most serious backup bands in the world.
NEWS
June 22, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The renovated, refurbished, rebranded Dell Music Center makes a little history Saturday with a free performance of Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 by the Black Pearl Chamber Orchestra, featuring a cadre of amateur guest musicians and singers drawn from the region. It will be the first time the Dell has hosted classical music since 1976, when the Philadelphia Orchestra, which had made the North Philadelphia venue its summer home since 1935, left for the Mann Music Center. The Dell was forced to reinvent itself, becoming one of the few venues in the region dedicated to urban music.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Few conductors have had the longevity, artistic consistency, and frequent-flier miles of Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos. The 80-year-old Spanish conductor, who died of cancer Wednesday in Pamplona, Spain, first led the Philadelphia Orchestra in 1969, after flying into New York City during one of the worst snowstorms in decades. He returned virtually every year thereafter. "He developed an unparalleled relationship with our musicians, appearing continually for nearly half a century," said orchestra president Allison Vulgamore.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra is not what it used to be. And that's excellent news. The faces haven't changed much but the touring demeanor has, from that of the ensemble that walked on water during European summer festivals past to the 2014 version that does whatever it must to manage the wide-reaching, 2 1/2-week tour of Asia that ended Thursday in Taipei, Taiwan. The orchestra's leadership has been rewriting the rules, negotiating China dates themselves in ways that cultivate new sponsors and could net an estimated $1 million-plus.
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