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Philadelphia Orchestra

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LIVING
June 15, 2001 | By Diane Goldsmith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Ann and Bill Hozack bought it in 1996, Homewoods, their storied Chestnut Hill estate, was in a state of neglect, the gardens terribly overgrown. That they saw beyond the vines is evident in the refurbished grand Norman-style home whose serene backyard is now a frequent site for garden-party benefits. Two have been held there this spring, and tomorrow the Hozacks will host well over 150 guests for the Philadelphia Orchestra's tony "Toys for Big Boys" event. "It's a fabulous house.
NEWS
May 23, 2006 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
JOSEPH C. LANZA, a Philadelphia Orchestra violinist since 1958, died of pneumonia early Saturday morning. He was 73. "His life was the orchestra," Roslyn, his wife of 53 years said. "He was totally committed and dedicated to music. " On Saturday evening, before the orchestra's final concert of the season, Bach's "Air on a G String" was performed in his honor, and his chair was left empty. Lanza held the title of assistant principal second violinist, and could prominently be seen playing with youthful excitement.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1986 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the months to come, the Delaware Valley's museums, cultural institutions and performing arts groups will be keying many of their activities to the 200th anniversary of the convention that met in this city in the hot summer of 1787 and produced what George Washington later called "that precious depository of American happiness, the Constitution of the United States. " Starting this month and continuing through 1987, there'll be exhibits and historical presentations, plays and parades, conferences and symposiums, lectures and ceremonies, culminating - but not ending - Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Yefim Bronfman was the soloist in Prokofiev's brashly entertaining Third Piano Concerto, whose energies enlivened the Philadelphia Orchestra program, under Charles Dutoit, last night at the Academy of Music. Bronfman, 34, and a frequent visitor to this orchestra, possesses that brilliance of tone and overall alacrity to make the most of its glittering timbres and escalations, while his command of the work's sonorities is impressively virile. There was much to admire in the keyboard's climbing, spiraling passagework - its perpetual fevers that can exhaust a player's busy wrist.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Though the Philadelphia Orchestra enjoys many blue-sky moments these days, Friday's start to the weekend's subscription series had an especially rosy sense of well-earned arrival. Its impromptu concert Wednesday at Verizon Hall that followed the cancellation of its Carnegie Hall opening was a roaring feel-good public relations success. And then on Friday, the orchestra was doing what it does best, with Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducting Mahler's heaven-bound Symphony No. 4 (with many saints populating the final movement)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1991 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Mozart anniversary - rather gruesomely celebrating his death - has affirmed the liveliness of the music and the evergreen difficulty and reward of its performance. The Philadelphia Orchestra, playing last night on the anniversary itself, made its observance objective. No poignant last notes or somber choral reminders of the composer's neglect touched this program. Instead, conductor Gary Bertini led two of the three last Symphonies after prefacing them with a youthful Divertimento that portrayed Mozart as young, prodigious and barely able to contain his prankish relationship with the Salzburg musicians who played his music.
NEWS
September 22, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
The gala is over, the contract strike was averted, the new music director Wolfgang Sawallisch approved and introduced before the hardly old maestro, Riccardo Muti, returned to start his penultimate season. For the Philadelphia Orchestra, it has been an exhausting week. Understandable, then, that there was a certain back-to-work quality at the Academy of Music last night when the orchestra opened its subscription series. Actually it felt like a tough-love session with Father Muti whisking rather tightly the belt in Prokofiev's Classical Symphony and Tchaikovsky's Fourth, stopping to hug his charges only in a magnetically sensitive reading of the Barber Violin Concerto.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Tides flow in the life of an orchestra, urged and repelled by the orbital force of conductors and the orchestra's schedule. The spring tides that surged with the Philadelphia Orchestra in the last two weeks gave way last night to a probably inevitable neap tide. Christoph Eschenbach, the Houston Symphony's conductor who made an unscheduled but impressive debut here last fall, was back to lead a program that traced interesting relationships from Mozart to Berg. The tides that had sent waves breaking over the audiences were subdued last night.
NEWS
December 20, 1986 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Folk art frequently produces the image of youth climbing stairs toward maturity, crossing a landing and hobbling down steps toward the grave. That image was much in mind yesterday as Gilbert Levine, in his local debut, led the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Academy of Music. The spirit of the musicmaking reached the landing early and hurried listeners toward a feeling of overwhelming decrepitude. For the first half-hour, the climb was invigorating. Levine led the local premiere of Jacob Druckman's Aureoles, a work which has become a classic while Philadelphia wasn't looking.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Conductor Valery Gergiev probably had one of the more civilized receptions of his winter U.S. tour at Thursday's Philadelphia Orchestra concert. Pro-Ukrainian protesters were outside the Kimmel Center, having their say in the ongoing debate about Gergiev's support of Russian president Vladimir Putin, and inside, the concert was business as usual - as much as Gergiev's concerts are ever typical. He has long been the master of spontaneous combustion. Although Gergiev's own Mariinsky Orchestra often plays with world-class inspiration, it's sonically compromised by the substandard quality of instruments.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peter Beckett Pakradooni, 75, of Wynnewood, a businessman and contributor to fraternity life in Philadelphia, died Wednesday, Feb. 4, at Lankenau Hospital of heart failure. Mr. Pakradooni worked in his family's business, International Printing. The business was started in Old City by his grandfather, Haig H. Pakradooni Sr., the Persian consul in Philadelphia. When the firm closed in 1983, the younger Mr. Pakradooni joined Packard Press in Philadelphia, and later, Smith-Edwards-Dunlap Co., where he was vice president until his death.
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
"Maestros. Can't live with 'em, can't run a major orchestra without 'em," says Bernadette Peters in the Amazon.com miniseries Mozart in the Jungle . Well, the Philadelphia Orchestra temporarily did without a maestro on Thursday in a conductorless program of Mozart, Beethoven, and Grieg - all smartly chosen to accommodate a more communal form of music-making that string quartets know well, with the added charisma of the British piano goddess Imogen...
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Symphony orchestras don't typically slot in visits to China in the middle of a busy season. But the Philadelphia Orchestra is in the midst of its Pearl River Delta Residency Week, which slipped into high gear - after more than the usual Chinese cliffhangers - with a performance Wednesday of the choral/orchestral work Ode to Humanity in Macau. "I tell you, the world is getting small," said cellist Udi Bar-David, having recently stepped off a nonstop 15-hour flight from JFK Airport.
NEWS
January 31, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Though the Philadelphia Orchestra has a steep climb ahead in its largest-ever fund-raising campaign effort, several key pieces helping to smooth the path are falling into place. The Philadelphia Orchestra Association has secured the stability of its artistic, administrative, and board leadership - an important checkoff on the list of many foundations and philanthropists. Board chairman Richard B. Worley will stay on another three years, as will president Allison B. Vulgamore. And the orchestra and music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin have committed to another five years together.
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbara Gottlieb Zehender, 75, of Philadelphia, a trailblazer for women in the field of advertising, died Thursday, Jan. 15, of an intestinal ailment at her Center City home. Over three decades, Mrs. Zehender rose from clerk to partner and executive vice president at Dorland Global Health Communications in Philadelphia. She was a single mother of two small children with a graduate degree in special education when she knocked on the door of Harry Sweeney, Dorland's president. "I don't know anything about advertising," she told him. "But I'm smart, I'll do anything, and I really need a job. " The pitch worked.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Of all the hours of music that will transpire at the Kimmel Center during the Philadelphia Orchestra's 2015-2016 season, the most eagerly anticipated are likely to be the concerts led by James Levine, revered music director of the Metropolitan Opera. Having been personally invited by Philadelphia Orchestra music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin - a regular guest conductor at the Met - Levine will make his first conducting appearance outside of New York City since he returned from a series of back-related surgeries and a two-year hiatus that ended in 2013.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
One of the most startling moments at Saturday night's Academy of Music 158th Anniversary Concert was hearing the Philadelphia Orchestra in an important, rarely heard William Walton score. That may seem like the sort of thing that shouldn't surprise. It's an orchestra concert, after all. But this annual fund-raiser has had so many demands layered on it in recent years - celebrate the building, bring in a younger crowd, keep the old guard happy, hold the attention of a rather corporate audience, and raise a lot of money - that the orchestra has sometimes gotten lost in the shuffle.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The guard is changing. After 27 years, Alan Harler is stepping down from the Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia, but not without first conducting Bach's St. Matthew Passion . Also departing after Year 27 is Orchestra 2001's founder and director James Freeman, who will do what he does best - George Crumb - in an 85th-birthday tribute to the great composer whose works he has so often launched. David Hayes seems too young to have been with the Philadelphia Singers for 25 years, but it's true, and he announced his departure before the group said that this season would be its last as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra last toured Europe in 2011 in deeply uncertain circumstances: The orchestra was still in bankruptcy and entering contract negotiations amid fears about the future. Yannick Nézet-Séguin had been appointed, but would not become music director until the next year. The orchestra was led by chief conductor Charles Dutoit. In contrast, the 2015 Tour of Europe, announced Tuesday, promises to be a consolidation of more successful times for the Philadelphia Orchestra, and under the leadership of Nézet-Séguin, already a well-known figure there.
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