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Philadelphia Orchestra

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LIVING
June 15, 2001 | By Diane Goldsmith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Ann and Bill Hozack bought it in 1996, Homewoods, their storied Chestnut Hill estate, was in a state of neglect, the gardens terribly overgrown. That they saw beyond the vines is evident in the refurbished grand Norman-style home whose serene backyard is now a frequent site for garden-party benefits. Two have been held there this spring, and tomorrow the Hozacks will host well over 150 guests for the Philadelphia Orchestra's tony "Toys for Big Boys" event. "It's a fabulous house.
NEWS
May 23, 2006 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
JOSEPH C. LANZA, a Philadelphia Orchestra violinist since 1958, died of pneumonia early Saturday morning. He was 73. "His life was the orchestra," Roslyn, his wife of 53 years said. "He was totally committed and dedicated to music. " On Saturday evening, before the orchestra's final concert of the season, Bach's "Air on a G String" was performed in his honor, and his chair was left empty. Lanza held the title of assistant principal second violinist, and could prominently be seen playing with youthful excitement.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1986 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the months to come, the Delaware Valley's museums, cultural institutions and performing arts groups will be keying many of their activities to the 200th anniversary of the convention that met in this city in the hot summer of 1787 and produced what George Washington later called "that precious depository of American happiness, the Constitution of the United States. " Starting this month and continuing through 1987, there'll be exhibits and historical presentations, plays and parades, conferences and symposiums, lectures and ceremonies, culminating - but not ending - Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
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Fabio Luisi and Christian Tetzlaff perform Tchaikovsky on Thursday through Saturday at the Kimmel Center. Information: 215-893-1999 or www.philorch.org .
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Yefim Bronfman was the soloist in Prokofiev's brashly entertaining Third Piano Concerto, whose energies enlivened the Philadelphia Orchestra program, under Charles Dutoit, last night at the Academy of Music. Bronfman, 34, and a frequent visitor to this orchestra, possesses that brilliance of tone and overall alacrity to make the most of its glittering timbres and escalations, while his command of the work's sonorities is impressively virile. There was much to admire in the keyboard's climbing, spiraling passagework - its perpetual fevers that can exhaust a player's busy wrist.
NEWS
September 22, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
The gala is over, the contract strike was averted, the new music director Wolfgang Sawallisch approved and introduced before the hardly old maestro, Riccardo Muti, returned to start his penultimate season. For the Philadelphia Orchestra, it has been an exhausting week. Understandable, then, that there was a certain back-to-work quality at the Academy of Music last night when the orchestra opened its subscription series. Actually it felt like a tough-love session with Father Muti whisking rather tightly the belt in Prokofiev's Classical Symphony and Tchaikovsky's Fourth, stopping to hug his charges only in a magnetically sensitive reading of the Barber Violin Concerto.
NEWS
December 20, 1986 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Folk art frequently produces the image of youth climbing stairs toward maturity, crossing a landing and hobbling down steps toward the grave. That image was much in mind yesterday as Gilbert Levine, in his local debut, led the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Academy of Music. The spirit of the musicmaking reached the landing early and hurried listeners toward a feeling of overwhelming decrepitude. For the first half-hour, the climb was invigorating. Levine led the local premiere of Jacob Druckman's Aureoles, a work which has become a classic while Philadelphia wasn't looking.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
CONDUCTOR Riccardo Muti 's official website says the conductor has undergone hip surgery in Italy following an accident. The website said yesterday that as a result the music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra , and former director of the Philadelphia Orchestra , cannot conduct concerts planned this month in Chicago. It said the accident was not serious, but provided no details. The news agency ANSA reported that Muti underwent the surgery in the Italian city of Ravenna after a fall at home.
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
Harold S. Rosenbluth, 91, a third-generation leader of the Rosenbluth travel agencies, died of cancer Wednesday, Feb. 3, at home in Haverford. Mr. Rosenbluth "was the one who bridged the second to the third to the fourth generations," his son Lee said. "He was the sole reason that we as a company were in the fourth generation. " Until his death, Mr. Rosenbluth remained chairman of Rosenbluth Vacations, which the family retained after selling Rosenbluth International Inc. to American Express Co. in 2003.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Mary Augusta Biddle Scheetz, 98, of Gladwyne, a mother, socialite, and civic volunteer, died Friday, Jan. 15, at Dunwoody Village in Newtown Square. Known as "Dusty," Mrs. Scheetz was born in Riverton, Burlington County, the daughter of Henry Canby Biddle and Margaret Seton Fleming Biddle. She was a descendant of the Owen Biddle branch of a family long prominent in Philadelphia civic affairs. In 1935, she graduated from the Agnes Irwin School, where her mother had taught. A debutante and Pond's Cold Cream model, Mrs. Scheetz was featured in an advertisement in 1937 as "Miss Mary Augusta Biddle.
NEWS
January 25, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
Jaimi Blackburn was more excited than Cinderella. The hotel public relations executive had been to all the big events in the city, but not this one, not the Academy of Music Anniversary Concert and Ball. "I got the shoes, a dress, manicure, pedicure, my husband got a tux, we booked a hotel in the city," said Blackburn, 47, of Villanova. "I gave up junk food for a week to make sure the dress would fit. " Then, she saw the message on Facebook. The Academy Ball, the swankiest white-tie concert and party in the city, had been canceled for the first time in the event's 59-year history.
NEWS
January 24, 2016
Yannick Nézet-Séguin's fifth season as Philadelphia Orchestra music director might not immediately look that different from the previous four. In some ways, that's intentional. Nézet-Séguin has often talked about the advantage in creating a familylike circle of performers - such as Karen Cargill, who was memorably featured in this season's Messiah and who will be back in May 2017 for the Mahler Symphony No. 3 . Certain composers don't stay away long: Now that Nézet-Séguin has conducted all of Rachmaninoff's symphonies, guest conductor Stéphane Denève will cover the composer's piano/orchestral works over three separate concerts April 27-29, 2017.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, MUSIC CRITIC
The Philadelphia Orchestra announced its 2016-17 subscription season Tuesday at the Kimmel Center. Usual classical music suspects like Brahms, Mahler, and Rachmaninoff will be joined by 21st-century electronics by Mason Bates, a new organ concerto by Pulitzer Prize-winner Christopher Rouse, and a screening of the movie E.T. with a live performance of the John Williams score. Among performers in the orchestra's 117th season, past visitors such as Simon Rattle and conductor laureate Charles Dutoit will return, and celebrated 22-year-old Canadian cellist Stephen Tetreault will make his debut.
NEWS
January 18, 2016
Early one morning, David Bowie opened the gate and went out into the big world of orchestral music, and, in a single half-hour recording, bagged a triumph. Bowie's narration of Peter and the Wolf with the Philadelphia Orchestra released in 1978 hardly represents the first or last handshake over this piece between classical long-hairs and pop stars. In hopes of finding a larger following, classical music often has looked to Prokofiev's 1936 work, inviting pop culture, show business, and political names of the day to do the narration.
NEWS
January 17, 2016
At 1 p.m. Sunday on WRTI-FM (90.1), guest conductor Robin Ticciati conducts the Philadelphia Orchestra in works by Robert Schumann and Wolfgang Mozart. Special broadcast: 1:30 p.m. Monday on WRTI: The orchestra's annual Martin Luther King Jr. tribute concert at Girard College Chapel.
NEWS
January 11, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
For Philadelphia Orchestra principal trumpeter David Bilger, the chance to help arrived as a friend request. AhmadBaset Azizi approached Bilger on Facebook about a year and a half ago with an intriguing overture: Could he study with Bilger - via video, online, from Afghanistan? Bilger agreed. It turns out that the 17-year-old Kabul musician has been making contacts all over the world, and now his drive and winsome way are paying off. Azizi will spend his last year of high school in northwest Michigan, at the well-regarded Interlochen Arts Academy, starting this fall - if money can be found.
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