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LIVING
June 15, 2001 | By Diane Goldsmith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Ann and Bill Hozack bought it in 1996, Homewoods, their storied Chestnut Hill estate, was in a state of neglect, the gardens terribly overgrown. That they saw beyond the vines is evident in the refurbished grand Norman-style home whose serene backyard is now a frequent site for garden-party benefits. Two have been held there this spring, and tomorrow the Hozacks will host well over 150 guests for the Philadelphia Orchestra's tony "Toys for Big Boys" event. "It's a fabulous house.
NEWS
May 23, 2006 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
JOSEPH C. LANZA, a Philadelphia Orchestra violinist since 1958, died of pneumonia early Saturday morning. He was 73. "His life was the orchestra," Roslyn, his wife of 53 years said. "He was totally committed and dedicated to music. " On Saturday evening, before the orchestra's final concert of the season, Bach's "Air on a G String" was performed in his honor, and his chair was left empty. Lanza held the title of assistant principal second violinist, and could prominently be seen playing with youthful excitement.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1986 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the months to come, the Delaware Valley's museums, cultural institutions and performing arts groups will be keying many of their activities to the 200th anniversary of the convention that met in this city in the hot summer of 1787 and produced what George Washington later called "that precious depository of American happiness, the Constitution of the United States. " Starting this month and continuing through 1987, there'll be exhibits and historical presentations, plays and parades, conferences and symposiums, lectures and ceremonies, culminating - but not ending - Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Yefim Bronfman was the soloist in Prokofiev's brashly entertaining Third Piano Concerto, whose energies enlivened the Philadelphia Orchestra program, under Charles Dutoit, last night at the Academy of Music. Bronfman, 34, and a frequent visitor to this orchestra, possesses that brilliance of tone and overall alacrity to make the most of its glittering timbres and escalations, while his command of the work's sonorities is impressively virile. There was much to admire in the keyboard's climbing, spiraling passagework - its perpetual fevers that can exhaust a player's busy wrist.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1991 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Mozart anniversary - rather gruesomely celebrating his death - has affirmed the liveliness of the music and the evergreen difficulty and reward of its performance. The Philadelphia Orchestra, playing last night on the anniversary itself, made its observance objective. No poignant last notes or somber choral reminders of the composer's neglect touched this program. Instead, conductor Gary Bertini led two of the three last Symphonies after prefacing them with a youthful Divertimento that portrayed Mozart as young, prodigious and barely able to contain his prankish relationship with the Salzburg musicians who played his music.
NEWS
September 22, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
The gala is over, the contract strike was averted, the new music director Wolfgang Sawallisch approved and introduced before the hardly old maestro, Riccardo Muti, returned to start his penultimate season. For the Philadelphia Orchestra, it has been an exhausting week. Understandable, then, that there was a certain back-to-work quality at the Academy of Music last night when the orchestra opened its subscription series. Actually it felt like a tough-love session with Father Muti whisking rather tightly the belt in Prokofiev's Classical Symphony and Tchaikovsky's Fourth, stopping to hug his charges only in a magnetically sensitive reading of the Barber Violin Concerto.
NEWS
December 20, 1986 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Folk art frequently produces the image of youth climbing stairs toward maturity, crossing a landing and hobbling down steps toward the grave. That image was much in mind yesterday as Gilbert Levine, in his local debut, led the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Academy of Music. The spirit of the musicmaking reached the landing early and hurried listeners toward a feeling of overwhelming decrepitude. For the first half-hour, the climb was invigorating. Levine led the local premiere of Jacob Druckman's Aureoles, a work which has become a classic while Philadelphia wasn't looking.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1989 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
The power of a guest soloist is not to be underestimated. A pianist or violinist suffering an off-evening can cast a pall over the best of ensembles that lingers through the night. That was the case at the Academy of Music last night as the Philadelphia Orchestra and Riccardo Muti endured Andrei Gavrilov's account of the Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor. Although it rated enthusiastic rounds of applause from the audience, some observers may have noticed no Philadelphians on stage clapping or bumping their bows in approval, which is the norm after even modestly successful performances.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
The empty nest is vastly overrated. Turns out, teenagers, especially when they are yours, are rather fun to have around, and far better conversationalists than toddlers. They make a joyful racket. I was dreading the moment when our daughter, our younger child, left for college. I made a list of choices. Travel more. Upend life. Acquire dog. The dog, it appears, will have to wait. After quite a few years and a couple of thousand bylines, this is my final column for The Inquirer.
NEWS
August 24, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The first Philadelphia Orchestra principal player to be hired during the tenure of music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin is an old friend of the orchestra. Israeli-born Nitzan Haroz will return to his former chair as principal trombonist effective immediately, the orchestra announced Thursday, four months after he won the audition. Haroz, 45, first came to the orchestra in the Wolfgang Sawallisch era, holding the principal spot from 1995 to 2012, then leaving to become principal of the Los Angeles Philharmonic for two years.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Symphony orchestra as jukebox? Such was the idea behind the Philadelphia Orchestra's People's Choice concert on Friday at the Mann Center. Some 16 possibilities posted on radio station WRTI-FM's website were subject to open voting, which yielded a good medium-weight concert of Sibelius, Tchaikovsky, Smetana - all classical music greatest hits that, with any luck, gave the audience an increased sense of ownership. Philosophically, it's a fine idea. But having such a concert more than once a year might not be healthy.
NEWS
August 3, 2014
ISSUE | GAZA Priorities are clear It is painful to watch the loss of civilian lives in the Gaza fortress that Hamas built in and under homes, schools, and hospitals, just as it is painful to see selective outrage over death and destruction that is but a fraction of the carnage in Syria, Iraq, and elsewhere in the Middle East. The effort that Israel has made to minimize the loss of civilian lives is unique in the annals of warfare, while Hamas has poured billions in aid and many tons of concrete into the ground to build bunkers, rocket-launching sites, and 80-foot-deep tunnels that have only one purpose - to facilitate attacks on Israel.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
It used to be we would go to the orchestra to avoid commercialism. Now, audiences are paying good money to be pitched to. Playing excerpts from the scores of Pixar films on two nights in Verizon Hall last week, the Philadelphia Orchestra set aside its charge of letting the public in on something interesting, overlooked, or artistically important. Instead, the ensemble played for two hours beneath a screen showing clips from Toy Story ( 1 , 2 and 3 ), Monsters Inc ., Cars ( 1 and 2 )
BUSINESS
July 29, 2014
Citizen Diplomacy International of Philadelphia, formerly the International Visitors Council of Philadelphia, a public/private partnership with the U.S. Department of State and the City of Philadelphia, has named Thomas Jennings , a partner at Hill Wallack L.L.P., Yardley, chairman. He replaces John W. Goldschmidt Jr. , a partner at Ference & Associates L.L.C., who will remain on the executive committee.    Other directors include: Christopher S. D'Angelo , partner at Montgomery McCracken Walker & Rhodes L.L.P., Philadelphia; Michael A. Schwartz , partner at Pepper Hamilton L.L.P., Philadelphia; and Gabriella Vacca, vice president, system engineering, at Comcast Corp., Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Though Philadelphia seems not to lack classical music concerts or educational opportunities for young artists, Taiwanese pianist Ching-Yun Hu came home to her Academy House apartment one recent summer, wanted to hear live music, and discovered there wasn't any. "I had just come back from my own festival in Taipei," she said. "People were so excited about it, and I thought, 'Why not do something similar here?' " Now, in these sweaty late-July weeks, the festival she founded, the Philadelphia Young Pianist Academy, is in its second year and occupies the Curtis Institute's Field Concert Hall with a series of five concerts Saturday through Aug. 2. They are the most prominent manifestations of an intensive program of master classes and lectures.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first thing to know about composer and pianist Uri Caine is that he started young in the Philadelphia jazz scene, learning from masters like saxophonists Bootsie Barnes and the late Grover Washington Jr. Caine, now 58, went on to develop modernist classical chops and do daring reinterpretations of classical works from Wagner, Beethoven, and Bach, becoming almost a genre unto himself. The world premiere of Caine's The Passion of Octavius Catto on Saturday night at the Mann Center was in some ways a summary of the composer's eclectic career as well as a celebration of an epic life.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Jazz pianist/composer Uri Caine's many years gone from his native Philadelphia are melting away, into a kind of music he wasn't taught at the University of Pennsylvania, and in places his colleagues don't typically navigate. His The Passion of Octavius Catto , a jazz/gospel oratorio about the martyred Philadelphia civil rights leader, will have its world premiere Saturday at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts. It is being rehearsed at the historic St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church in what's called in hip-hop circles "the O-Zone" (Olney)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
With his Noel Coward-esque wit and solid command of the Philadelphia Orchestra, guest conductor Bramwell Tovey is always a delight to encounter in special, not-entirely-classical occasions that could easily fall apart under a lesser personality. But on Friday at the Mann Center, Tovey conducted music that didn't require (or receive) his usual witty introductions: Beethoven's Symphony No. 9 . It can be as problematic as it is great, yet here was thoroughly accomplished, with excitement arising from a strong musical foundation, cultivated opinions on how the music should go, and a keen ability to make that happen.
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