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NEWS
September 3, 2010
THE BAD news is that this year the city's murder rate is up. The good news is that Philadelphia police are trying a variety of new tactics to bring it back down. As reported Monday by our colleague David Gambacorta , the city won a major federal grant to try out new policing strategies. The Smart Policing Initiative doesn't rely on higher IQs but on intelligent deployment aimed at putting cops in close touch with the communities they serve. Besides actual feet on the street, the effort will include plainclothes surveillance and reinforcements from other city agencies addressing underlying issues like vacant properties or nuisance bars that contribute to lawlessness.
NEWS
June 25, 2010 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Philadelphia police officers have questions about the nuts and bolts of the department, be it evidence storage, fingerprinting, or employee-assistance programs, there's a good chance Chief Inspector Robert Davis knows the answer. Davis, who heads the department's Support Services bureau, has over the last decade become an expert on the finer details of what it takes to keep the 6,600-plus members of the Philadelphia police force up and running. Davis, who retires Friday after 42 years on the job, still isn't quite sure how he became the behind-the-scenes details man in recent years.
NEWS
February 10, 2012
THIS IS in response to a letter written by Donna Di Giacomo: I don't write many letters to the editor but find, as a citizen of this great city, that I must. I take exception to calling the Philadelphia Police Department the "Philadelphia Thug Department," as your letter appears to state. I don't believe that the police went to assault anyone, but went to enforce a legal order. I believe that the city and the police gave the Occupy movement great leeway. And they are not thugs.
NEWS
July 16, 2000
Maximum penalties The brutal videotaped beating, kicking, pummeling, striking and punching - reminiscent of Rodney King - of an unarmed and wounded black man named Thomas Jones by about 12 Philadelphia police officers is inexcusable and must result in maximum criminal penalties by state and federal law-enforcement authorities. In addition, the wanton blasting of about 50 shots from several high-powered police firearms in a residential neighborhood at noon, with slugs tearing into cars and houses and ricocheting into the air, is even more inexcusable and must also result in maximum penalties.
NEWS
April 21, 1996 | By Mark Fazlollah, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From 1990 to 1995, the Philadelphia Police Department fired 82 officers it found had committed robbery, rape, extortion, drug trafficking and other offenses. One was convicted of murder. But almost until the moment it fired them, the department gave those officers top performance ratings - including the murderer. Gene Lomazoff, a sergeant in the 35th Police District in Olney, was convicted of pulling over motorists for traffic infractions, then shaking them down for cash between November 1990 and June 1993.
NEWS
July 25, 2016 | By Stephanie Farr, Staff Writer
Long after his retirement in 1971, Philadelphia Police Lt. John A. Stevenson would tell his children and grandchildren about the time he starred alongside Frank Rizzo and other Philadelphia officers in one of the first reality-based law enforcement shows on television. "He always talked about it. It was like family lore," said Dan Stevenson, 40, Stevenson's grandson. "We were like, 'OK, Pop Pop, you were on a TV show.' " Stevenson insisted he was on a TV show, and it was hosted by Oscar-winning actor Lee Marvin.
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By William Bender, Staff Writer
Amid heightened tensions after a fatal sniper attack on police in Dallas, Mayor Kenney on Friday called on all sides to "listen and to be willing to hear one another. " "I ask all Philadelphians not to react in hate, anger, or violence, but instead to grieve with the nation by listening to one another," Kenney said in a statement. But area police officers reacted with outrage to the news from Dallas that five officers had been fatally shot and seven others wounded as protesters marched in response to the killings of two black men by police in Louisiana and Minnesota.
NEWS
December 20, 1994 | By Monica Rhor, Terri Sanginiti and Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., FOR THE INQUIRER Inquirer staff writer Jeff Gelles contributed to this story
A Philadelphia man was charged yesterday with murdering his girlfriend's 2 1/2-year-old son. The boy, Robert Hicks, son of a Camden police officer, died Saturday afternoon of blunt-force trauma to the body, suffering bruises to his head, numerous internal injuries, including damage to his liver, and a broken arm, police sources said yesterday. "You would really have to punch a child hard to lacerate his liver," said Sgt. Paul Musi of the Philadelphia Police Department's homicide division.
NEWS
July 24, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
He's out of solitary confinement for the first time in 22 years, and $99,000 richer from settlement of a civil rights lawsuit against Pennsylvania prison officials. But at 72 - serving life without parole for the 1970 murder of Philadelphia Police Sgt. Frank Von Colln - Russell Shoatz is never getting out, and now ponders his remaining life behind bars. "One of the biggest things is that my father is now beginning a period of growth and development," said Shoatz's son, Russell III. The younger Shoatz said there was talk of using part of the settlement to help inmates reenter society.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 8, 2016
ISSUE | POLICE A rebuffed Samaritan As a retired lieutenant of the Philadelphia Police Department (badge number 188), I was in the habit of stopping whenever I saw a lone officer conducting a vehicle or pedestrian stop and asking whether he or she needed assistance. I would flash my badge and identification to let the officer know I had been a policeman. I carry a legal weapon. Usually, they thanked me. One time, a Springfield, Delaware County, officer tracked me down to thank me. On the last two occasions, however, Ridley Township and Eddystone officers practically growled at me and told me to move on. These two incidents have soured me on providing assistance.
NEWS
August 4, 2016
ISSUE | HOST CITY Top-notch police work A tip of the hat to the Philadelphia Police Department ("Police kept the peace," Saturday). As a former assistant secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, I have participated in the planning of dozens of large-scale international events. In this post-9/11 era, with the threat of terrorism looming over our shoulders, Philadelphia police balanced huge security issues with the freedoms protected in this great nation. The police deserve a huge "Thank you. " and the city should be proud of their performance.
NEWS
August 2, 2016
LAST WEEK, we cringed when we heard a report that Philadelphia police were dousing protesters at the Democratic National Convention with water from fire hydrants. Our immediate thought was that training high-pressure fire hoses on protesters was a bad idea, a throwback to the bad old days. It turned out our initial impression was wrong. The police weren't trying to disperse the protesters who were marching down Broad Street. They were using the hydrants to create gentle showers of water to give marchers some relief from the scorching heat.
NEWS
August 1, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, STAFF WRITER
Mayor Kenney on Friday applauded the city's preparations and performance during the Democratic National Convention -- particularly the complete lack of arrests of protesters by the Philadelphia Police Department. "I want to thank Philadelphians for being such wonderful hosts," Kenney said at a news briefing and curtain call for the four-day convention. "I had so many people stop me on the streets and say how friendly Philadelphians really are and that's the best advertising in the world.
NEWS
July 25, 2016 | By Stephanie Farr, Staff Writer
Long after his retirement in 1971, Philadelphia Police Lt. John A. Stevenson would tell his children and grandchildren about the time he starred alongside Frank Rizzo and other Philadelphia officers in one of the first reality-based law enforcement shows on television. "He always talked about it. It was like family lore," said Dan Stevenson, 40, Stevenson's grandson. "We were like, 'OK, Pop Pop, you were on a TV show.' " Stevenson insisted he was on a TV show, and it was hosted by Oscar-winning actor Lee Marvin.
NEWS
July 24, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
He's out of solitary confinement for the first time in 22 years, and $99,000 richer from settlement of a civil rights lawsuit against Pennsylvania prison officials. But at 72 - serving life without parole for the 1970 murder of Philadelphia Police Sgt. Frank Von Colln - Russell Shoatz is never getting out, and now ponders his remaining life behind bars. "One of the biggest things is that my father is now beginning a period of growth and development," said Shoatz's son, Russell III. The younger Shoatz said there was talk of using part of the settlement to help inmates reenter society.
NEWS
July 21, 2016
By Taylor Hosking There appears to be at least one area of agreement between activists and some law enforcement leaders: community policing, where building relationships and regular positive interactions with the community are central to police work. Every day, behind gymnasium doors in Philadelphia, there are sanctuaries of trust between children and officers that quietly defy the us-vs.-them narrative. In Kensington, a refreshing wave of familiar sounds - basketballs on linoleum and kids yelling - breaks through the doorway of the Police Athletic League Lighthouse Community Center.
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By William Bender, Staff Writer
Amid heightened tensions after a fatal sniper attack on police in Dallas, Mayor Kenney on Friday called on all sides to "listen and to be willing to hear one another. " "I ask all Philadelphians not to react in hate, anger, or violence, but instead to grieve with the nation by listening to one another," Kenney said in a statement. But area police officers reacted with outrage to the news from Dallas that five officers had been fatally shot and seven others wounded as protesters marched in response to the killings of two black men by police in Louisiana and Minnesota.
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, STAFF WRITER
Less than three weeks out from the Democratic National Convention, officials announced road closures, security perimeters and again addressed plans for dealing with protests. The security plan, confined mostly to South Philadelphia near the Wells Fargo Center, is more limited than the much larger papal visit's security footprint in the fall. Unlike the papal visit, all major highways in Philadelphia, including I-95, will remain open to passenger vehicles throughout the convention.
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