CollectionsPhiladelphia Police Department
IN THE NEWS

Philadelphia Police Department

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 3, 2010
THE BAD news is that this year the city's murder rate is up. The good news is that Philadelphia police are trying a variety of new tactics to bring it back down. As reported Monday by our colleague David Gambacorta , the city won a major federal grant to try out new policing strategies. The Smart Policing Initiative doesn't rely on higher IQs but on intelligent deployment aimed at putting cops in close touch with the communities they serve. Besides actual feet on the street, the effort will include plainclothes surveillance and reinforcements from other city agencies addressing underlying issues like vacant properties or nuisance bars that contribute to lawlessness.
NEWS
June 25, 2010 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Philadelphia police officers have questions about the nuts and bolts of the department, be it evidence storage, fingerprinting, or employee-assistance programs, there's a good chance Chief Inspector Robert Davis knows the answer. Davis, who heads the department's Support Services bureau, has over the last decade become an expert on the finer details of what it takes to keep the 6,600-plus members of the Philadelphia police force up and running. Davis, who retires Friday after 42 years on the job, still isn't quite sure how he became the behind-the-scenes details man in recent years.
NEWS
February 10, 2012
THIS IS in response to a letter written by Donna Di Giacomo: I don't write many letters to the editor but find, as a citizen of this great city, that I must. I take exception to calling the Philadelphia Police Department the "Philadelphia Thug Department," as your letter appears to state. I don't believe that the police went to assault anyone, but went to enforce a legal order. I believe that the city and the police gave the Occupy movement great leeway. And they are not thugs.
NEWS
July 16, 2000
Maximum penalties The brutal videotaped beating, kicking, pummeling, striking and punching - reminiscent of Rodney King - of an unarmed and wounded black man named Thomas Jones by about 12 Philadelphia police officers is inexcusable and must result in maximum criminal penalties by state and federal law-enforcement authorities. In addition, the wanton blasting of about 50 shots from several high-powered police firearms in a residential neighborhood at noon, with slugs tearing into cars and houses and ricocheting into the air, is even more inexcusable and must also result in maximum penalties.
NEWS
April 21, 1996 | By Mark Fazlollah, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From 1990 to 1995, the Philadelphia Police Department fired 82 officers it found had committed robbery, rape, extortion, drug trafficking and other offenses. One was convicted of murder. But almost until the moment it fired them, the department gave those officers top performance ratings - including the murderer. Gene Lomazoff, a sergeant in the 35th Police District in Olney, was convicted of pulling over motorists for traffic infractions, then shaking them down for cash between November 1990 and June 1993.
NEWS
September 15, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Chief Inspector Joseph Sullivan, who headed police response to the papal visit and the Democratic National Convention, was honored Tuesday for his 33 years in the Philadelphia Police Department. Sullivan was one of three recipients of the Richardson Dilworth Awards, which recognize full-time, executive-branch employees. Sullivan's Distinguished Public Service honor comes with a $5,000 stipend from Dilworth Paxson LLP and Independence Blue Cross. An additional award for Innovation in Government was given to Laura Cassidy, sustainability manager for the Philadelphia Department of Prisons; an award for customer service went to Joanne Dahme, general manager for public affairs at the Philadelphia Water Department.
NEWS
December 20, 1994 | By Monica Rhor, Terri Sanginiti and Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., FOR THE INQUIRER Inquirer staff writer Jeff Gelles contributed to this story
A Philadelphia man was charged yesterday with murdering his girlfriend's 2 1/2-year-old son. The boy, Robert Hicks, son of a Camden police officer, died Saturday afternoon of blunt-force trauma to the body, suffering bruises to his head, numerous internal injuries, including damage to his liver, and a broken arm, police sources said yesterday. "You would really have to punch a child hard to lacerate his liver," said Sgt. Paul Musi of the Philadelphia Police Department's homicide division.
NEWS
April 30, 2015 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Philadelphia, police call it a "nickel ride. " In Chicago, police call it a "joyride. " In Baltimore, investigators are exploring whether Freddie Gray may have been fatally injured - his spine nearly severed - when he was subjected to what police there call a "rough ride. " Whatever the name, the practice of throwing prisoners into the back of police wagons, unbelted, and then subjecting them to high-speed stops and starts is an aptly named form of street justice that has been secretly administered for many years in many cities.
NEWS
July 4, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
When the Democratic National Convention comes to town this month - bringing tens of thousands of protesters with it - Sgt. Eric Gripp likely will be somewhere in the throng, equipped with two cellphones, four batteries, and a very influential Twitter account. The voice of the Philadelphia Police Department's social-media presence is best known, by day, for his meme-filled posts on the department's Facebook and Twitter pages. But Gripp, 35, also has been an enduring presence at some of the biggest protests the city has seen in recent years, including last year's Black Lives Matter demonstrations, and he's well aware that what he tweets goes a long way. "You're not just the voice of yourself," he said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 23, 2016 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
Anthony Wright, who served 25 years in prison for rape and murder and was freed last month after a retrial based on new DNA evidence, has sued the City of Philadelphia and 11 police officers who investigated the case, alleging that they fabricated evidence. Wright, now 44, was sentenced to life without parole for the 1991 slaying of 77-year-old Louise Talley at her Nicetown home. On Aug. 23, after less than an hour of deliberation, a Common Pleas Court jury acquitted Wright, who walked out prison that day. "This miscarriage of justice was the direct result of egregious misconduct by the defendant officers of the Philadelphia Police Department," according to the 38-page complaint, filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 22, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, Staff Writer
Philadelphia Police Sgt. Sylvia Young, who was shot six times during Friday night's shooting rampage in West Philadelphia, was released Tuesday afternoon from Penn Presbyterian Medical Center. Dozens of fellow police officers who had gathered outside the hospital saluted Young as she emerged sitting on a wheelchair. The 19-year veteran with two grown daughters stood up on her own before Highway Patrol motorcycle officers escorted her the car she got into as it drove off. "She's going to be resting at home, and going to therapy," a police spokeswoman said.
NEWS
September 15, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Chief Inspector Joseph Sullivan, who headed police response to the papal visit and the Democratic National Convention, was honored Tuesday for his 33 years in the Philadelphia Police Department. Sullivan was one of three recipients of the Richardson Dilworth Awards, which recognize full-time, executive-branch employees. Sullivan's Distinguished Public Service honor comes with a $5,000 stipend from Dilworth Paxson LLP and Independence Blue Cross. An additional award for Innovation in Government was given to Laura Cassidy, sustainability manager for the Philadelphia Department of Prisons; an award for customer service went to Joanne Dahme, general manager for public affairs at the Philadelphia Water Department.
NEWS
September 4, 2016 | By Chris Palmer, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Police Department. The Philadelphia Sheriff's Office. SEPTA Transit Police. The U.S. Marshals Service. The FBI. None of those agencies has a tattoo policy, officials said Friday, meaning that Philadelphia Police Officer Ian Lichterman - whose apparent Nazi-style tattoo on his left forearm drew ire this week from Mayor Kenney and other critics - would not violate department directives at many of the region's law enforcement agencies, including...
NEWS
August 29, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
Gladys Gershenfeld, 91, who as the first female labor arbitrator in the Philadelphia area handled a wide range of labor disputes, including those involving SEPTA and the Philadelphia Police Department, died Thursday, Aug. 25, at the Quadrangle in Haverford after suffering from Alzheimer's. Mrs. Gershenfeld was a pioneer in the field of labor arbitration. There were few women role models, if any, when she decided to pursue a master's degree in industrial relations and labor at Cornell University in 1951, said her son Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld.
NEWS
August 22, 2016 | By John Taylor
  While we mourn his passing with sadness, John Timoney, who was once described as having "the soul of a street cop, the analytical skills of a professor, and the gruff tenacity of - in his words - an 'egomaniacal loudmouth,'" will be remembered by many for having revolutionized the way the Philadelphia Police Department looked at and developed strategies to fight crime. It could be said that Timoney was an innovator at a time when innovation in law enforcement was in short supply.
NEWS
August 8, 2016
ISSUE | POLICE A rebuffed Samaritan As a retired lieutenant of the Philadelphia Police Department (badge number 188), I was in the habit of stopping whenever I saw a lone officer conducting a vehicle or pedestrian stop and asking whether he or she needed assistance. I would flash my badge and identification to let the officer know I had been a policeman. I carry a legal weapon. Usually, they thanked me. One time, a Springfield, Delaware County, officer tracked me down to thank me. On the last two occasions, however, Ridley Township and Eddystone officers practically growled at me and told me to move on. These two incidents have soured me on providing assistance.
NEWS
August 4, 2016
ISSUE | HOST CITY Top-notch police work A tip of the hat to the Philadelphia Police Department ("Police kept the peace," Saturday). As a former assistant secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, I have participated in the planning of dozens of large-scale international events. In this post-9/11 era, with the threat of terrorism looming over our shoulders, Philadelphia police balanced huge security issues with the freedoms protected in this great nation. The police deserve a huge "Thank you. " and the city should be proud of their performance.
NEWS
August 2, 2016
LAST WEEK, we cringed when we heard a report that Philadelphia police were dousing protesters at the Democratic National Convention with water from fire hydrants. Our immediate thought was that training high-pressure fire hoses on protesters was a bad idea, a throwback to the bad old days. It turned out our initial impression was wrong. The police weren't trying to disperse the protesters who were marching down Broad Street. They were using the hydrants to create gentle showers of water to give marchers some relief from the scorching heat.
NEWS
August 1, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, STAFF WRITER
Mayor Kenney on Friday applauded the city's preparations and performance during the Democratic National Convention -- particularly the complete lack of arrests of protesters by the Philadelphia Police Department. "I want to thank Philadelphians for being such wonderful hosts," Kenney said at a news briefing and curtain call for the four-day convention. "I had so many people stop me on the streets and say how friendly Philadelphians really are and that's the best advertising in the world.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|