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Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority

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NEWS
September 28, 2012
The rift between the city and Ori Feibush has been moving closer to healing, with both sides saying they are working on an agreement that would allow the Point Breeze developer to lease the disputed trash-cleared lot near his coffee shop until the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority sells it. Paul Chrystie, a spokesman for the authority, said the sides had not signed anything but hoped to reach a deal soon. - Miriam Hill  
NEWS
September 27, 2012 | By Miriam Hill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The rift between the city and Ori Feibush has been moving closer to healing, with both sides saying they are working on an agreement that would allow the Point Breeze developer to lease the lot until the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority, or PRA, sells it. Paul Chrystie, a spokesman for the PRA, said the two sides had not signed anything yet but hoped to reach a deal soon. News organizations around the world had picked up the story of how Feibush cleared trash from the lot at 20th and Annin streets and added landscaping out of frustration with ongoing blight there, only to have the city tell him to stop the improvements.
NEWS
February 12, 2013
Sunday's "Town by Town" article incorrectly described the developers of a 64-unit seniors-housing complex at 10th and Ellsworth Streets. Cedars Village is being developed by Ingerman, the Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency, Citibank, the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority, and St. Maron Community Development Corp. The "Big Tent" column Sunday erred in locating the district of U.S. Rep. Scott Perry (R., Pa.). The Fourth District is in the York-Harrisburg area, not the Pittsburgh suburbs.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
The brew-haha over the cleaned-up, vacant lot next to the coffee shop owned by Point Breeze developer Ori Feibush may end this week. "I'm considering an option to lease the property, where my office will take over 100 percent liability of the lot and maintain it as public space," Feibush said Thursday. The lease would remain in effect until the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority sells the lot, on 20th Street, near Federal. Feibush has made no bones about the fact that he's been trying to buy it. "We want to make sure there is an open bidding process and that when the property does go up for auction, language [in the agreement]
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
CITY COUNCIL'S Rules Committee moved forward with a controversial plan Tuesday that would allow the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority (PRA) to take more than two dozen properties through eminent domain to build affordable housing in Point Breeze. A month ago, that plan, sponsored by Councilman Kenyatta Johnson on behalf of the Nutter administration, included 43 properties, some of which private developers owned and planned to develop. PRA had since reduced the number of properties it will condemn to 28, including 17 privately owned and 11 city-owned properties, after it found that owners have projects under way, applied for permits or are using the lots as side yards to their residences.
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
IN SOME Philadelphia neighborhoods, economic revitalization is in full bloom, with new housing springing up like colorful flowers. But those flowers often come with price tags that put them far out of reach for the average city dweller. That's why city officials yesterday gathered on a vacant city-owned lot in Francisville to announce the latest step in a plan to make new housing units affordable to more people in areas that are moving on up. "Essentially, today we're rolling out the first phase of a very aggressive plan to ensure affordability," City Council President Darrell Clarke said.
NEWS
October 11, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer
A BATTLE IS BREWING in Point Breeze between private developers and the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority, which plans to acquire dozens of properties through eminent domain to build affordable housing. Private developers call it a "land grab" of properties that are being worked on or were recently purchased. "Is this America?" asked Turlough Harte, a developer who just built two homes on Federal Street near 20th and who was hoping to soon begin construction on two vacant lots he's owned for several years on 17th street near Latona that he recently learned the city plans to take.
NEWS
March 25, 1988 | By Charles V. Zehren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Plans for the city's proposed convention center became even cloudier yesterday when the Reading Co., owner of a key part of the site, said it had agreed to a $74 million buy-out offer from Philadelphia real estate tycoon Samuel Rappaport. Reading, the 154-year-old Philadelphia railroad-turned-real estate firm, has tentatively agreed to be acquired by a Rappaport company, said James A. Wunderle, Reading's financial vice president. "Assuming that Rappaport's offer goes through," those negotiating to buy the land for the convention center will have to deal with "a new participant," said John Claypool, executive director of the Greater Philadelphia First Corp.
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NEWS
June 17, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
IN SOME Philadelphia neighborhoods, economic revitalization is in full bloom, with new housing springing up like colorful flowers. But those flowers often come with price tags that put them far out of reach for the average city dweller. That's why city officials yesterday gathered on a vacant city-owned lot in Francisville to announce the latest step in a plan to make new housing units affordable to more people in areas that are moving on up. "Essentially, today we're rolling out the first phase of a very aggressive plan to ensure affordability," City Council President Darrell Clarke said.
NEWS
November 28, 2014
IN RECENT days, both 2nd District Councilman Kenyatta Johnson and businessman Ori Feibush gave away Thanksgiving turkeys to the needy in Point Breeze. They did it separately. Johnson is a former state rep in his first term in Council. His district includes parts of Center City, South Philadelphia, Eastwick and Hawthorne, in addition to Point Breeze. Feibush is a high-profile and controversial developer in Point Breeze and elsewhere who will challenge Johnson in next year's election.
NEWS
February 12, 2013
Sunday's "Town by Town" article incorrectly described the developers of a 64-unit seniors-housing complex at 10th and Ellsworth Streets. Cedars Village is being developed by Ingerman, the Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency, Citibank, the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority, and St. Maron Community Development Corp. The "Big Tent" column Sunday erred in locating the district of U.S. Rep. Scott Perry (R., Pa.). The Fourth District is in the York-Harrisburg area, not the Pittsburgh suburbs.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
CITY COUNCIL'S Rules Committee moved forward with a controversial plan Tuesday that would allow the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority (PRA) to take more than two dozen properties through eminent domain to build affordable housing in Point Breeze. A month ago, that plan, sponsored by Councilman Kenyatta Johnson on behalf of the Nutter administration, included 43 properties, some of which private developers owned and planned to develop. PRA had since reduced the number of properties it will condemn to 28, including 17 privately owned and 11 city-owned properties, after it found that owners have projects under way, applied for permits or are using the lots as side yards to their residences.
NEWS
October 11, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer
A BATTLE IS BREWING in Point Breeze between private developers and the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority, which plans to acquire dozens of properties through eminent domain to build affordable housing. Private developers call it a "land grab" of properties that are being worked on or were recently purchased. "Is this America?" asked Turlough Harte, a developer who just built two homes on Federal Street near 20th and who was hoping to soon begin construction on two vacant lots he's owned for several years on 17th street near Latona that he recently learned the city plans to take.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
The brew-haha over the cleaned-up, vacant lot next to the coffee shop owned by Point Breeze developer Ori Feibush may end this week. "I'm considering an option to lease the property, where my office will take over 100 percent liability of the lot and maintain it as public space," Feibush said Thursday. The lease would remain in effect until the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority sells the lot, on 20th Street, near Federal. Feibush has made no bones about the fact that he's been trying to buy it. "We want to make sure there is an open bidding process and that when the property does go up for auction, language [in the agreement]
NEWS
September 28, 2012
The rift between the city and Ori Feibush has been moving closer to healing, with both sides saying they are working on an agreement that would allow the Point Breeze developer to lease the disputed trash-cleared lot near his coffee shop until the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority sells it. Paul Chrystie, a spokesman for the authority, said the sides had not signed anything but hoped to reach a deal soon. - Miriam Hill  
NEWS
September 28, 2012
City, stop harassing developer Mayor Nutter and the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority should be ashamed of their efforts to penalize developer Ori Feibush ("Feud over empty lot puts city in a stink," Saturday). We owe responsible developers such as Feibush a debt of gratitude for risking their own resources to improve decaying neighborhoods. The city is dotted with vacant, blighted lots that need the cleaning and greening that Feibush has brought to Point Breeze. I hope that the hollow threats of Nutter and the authority will not stop Feibush and other civic-minded developers.
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