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Philadelphia Sound

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NEWS
November 18, 2000
Bench-sitting rookie infielders are better known than symphony orchestra musicians - even if the baseball team is as bad as the Phillies have been, and the orchestra is as great as the "Fabulous Philadelphians. " The Philadelphia Orchestra is observing its 100th anniversary amid well-deserved accolades - and molto uncertainty. Here's why: It will soon vacate the venerable Academy of Music and move into the not yet completed (and not yet completely funded) Center for the Performing Arts a block away.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1997 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Philadelphia sound is like spring waters with reputed magical powers, drawing conductors increasingly to sample it. From the reactive days of the '80s when Riccardo Muti called the Philadelphia sound a public relations joke, conductors like Wolfgang Sawallisch have begun to find new glories in Leopold Stokowski's transcriptions and in the repertoire that sounded like so much silk brocade during the 44-year Ormandy era. Another believer and...
NEWS
May 24, 1989 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
When the Philadelphia Orchestra crosses the international date line, it seems to pass under a lens that magnifies its stature until it assumes stardom before it plays a note. Japan is a notable case in point. The fever for Western classical music that swept the country after World War II shows no sign of abating. The nation consumes music at a rate that its own orchestras and soloists cannot satisfy, so it is a huge importer of orchestras and opera companies. There are Berlin Philharmonic connoisseurs, Vienna Philharmonic fan clubs, and a Philadelphia Orchestra following with increasing visibility.
NEWS
October 4, 2007 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A trio of silky Philadelphia soul singers sang about romance in separate groups during the 1970s heyday of the Philly Sound. To hear them sing it, love was a betcha-by-golly-wow-la-la-means-I-love-you-what's-come-over-me kind of feeling. Their signature was the tenor croon. Their sound helped define the era's music. Now, decades after topping the music charts, William "Poogie" Hart, Ted Mills and Russell Thompkins Jr. have joined voices. Their new CD, All the Way From Philadelphia, celebrates the croon and crowns the trio the "Three Tenors of Soul.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1998 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The cab driver in rainy San Francisco said it best when the passenger said he was going to hear the Philadelphia Orchestra: "They're, like, one of the best in the world, right?" Much of California seemed to think so last week as the Philadelphians worked their way south through the state on the first leg of a three-week, five-country tour. Tuesday night in San Francisco, where the tour began, the Davies Hall crowd stood and yelled for more at the end of Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 5. "The orchestra sounds just wonderful, a real pleasure," reported Michael Tilson Thomas - "MTT" to just about everyone who knows the San Francisco Symphony music director.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2007 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
A magnificent question mark has hovered in the atmosphere above the Philadelphia Orchestra since Vladimir Jurowski's debut here 15 months ago. The orchestra's relationship history with guest conductors, after all, is a curious one, littered with false leads (Roberto Abbado), mysterious disappearances (Riccardo Chailly), and a rush to judgment of some extraordinary podium talent (Ingo Metzmacher). But Thursday night, in his first performance since the one that stunned musicians and listeners, Jurowski absolutely established that the magic of his debut was no fluke.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1995 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Just a year before becoming music director of the Philadelphia Orchestra, Riccardo Muti rattled its listeners by asking: "What is the 'Philadelphia Sound?' It's a publicity thing, isn't it?" The question drew blood. It was as if he had proposed that William Penn be lifted off City Hall and put in storage. That question started a lively debate that continues still. Baffled by the uproar, Muti went on to say that an orchestra should have a sound for Mozart, for Brahms, for Scriabin and for other composers rather than forcing all music into one sound mold.
NEWS
January 26, 2007 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
No matter how architecturally impressive a building may be, it's only walls and ceiling until animated by people who command - if not surpass - its potential. Though the sounds of many great artists massaged the Academy of Music's plaster in its first 50 years, the Old World structure waited until 1912 to take its place among the centers of New World culture with the arrival of its first resident titan, conductor Leopold Stokowski. The first great music director of the Philadelphia Orchestra, whose stormy reign lasted until 1941, Stokowski wasn't just the most glamorous of Philadelphia musicians, he was possibly the most artistically distinguished.
NEWS
October 16, 1989 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Teddy Pendergrass' eyes are closed behind gold-framed glasses. His face is serene, like that of someone meditating, as he tunes in to the music that fills the recording studio. He savors it, rocking gently, bobbing his head, shifting his shoulders from side to side. He is lost in it, oblivious to all save that which has sustained him through triumphs and trials. "It's my life," says Pendergrass, one of nine new members to be inducted today into the Philadelphia Music Foundation Hall of Fame.
NEWS
January 16, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MAUREEN GRAY was about 12 when she wandered into a record store at 60th and Market streets to listen to the music she had heard played on the air by such disc jockeys as Jocko Henderson and Georgie Woods. It was the famous Philadelphia Sound, launched on many a street corner in the '50s and '60s by kids harmonizing on doo-wop songs. Maureen liked to sing along with the records played in the store. But it was no ordinary store. A co-owner was John Madara, a songwriter and promoter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
With the recent release of Déjà Vu , his first solo album in 30 years, producer/composer Giorgio Moroder shows that at 75, he's making music as vitally on-point as ever. And this time around, it has a local beat. Rather than rely on the stammering arpeggios and swirling synthetic string sounds of disco - like the 1970s dance-floor hits Moroder and lyricist Pete Bellotte crafted for the late, great Donna Summer - Déjà Vu does the next best thing. It deals in the currency of EDM - disco's slickly dressed grandson - with a theatrical flourish, pumping four-on-the-floor rhythms and vocal contributions from a murderers' row of femme hit-makers Charlie XCX, Kelis, Kylie Minogue, Sia, and Britney Spears.
NEWS
January 22, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WELL, A PAPER BAG full of dollar bills was better than nothing. That was the payment the female Philly singing group The Sweet Delights got for a gig in New Jersey. Even though the group packed the club, the manager said he couldn't pay the women because he didn't make much money. However, he must have thought better of his decision, because he later produced the bag of bills. Gerylane Edgehill, who organized and sang with what by then was a three-woman soul and R&B group from North Philly, told that story to writer Charlie Horner for an article in Echoes of the Past.
NEWS
January 16, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MAUREEN GRAY was about 12 when she wandered into a record store at 60th and Market streets to listen to the music she had heard played on the air by such disc jockeys as Jocko Henderson and Georgie Woods. It was the famous Philadelphia Sound, launched on many a street corner in the '50s and '60s by kids harmonizing on doo-wop songs. Maureen liked to sing along with the records played in the store. But it was no ordinary store. A co-owner was John Madara, a songwriter and promoter.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Philadelphia Orchestra presents the interactive music program "Sound All Around," for ages 3 to 5, at the Academy of Music on Saturday and Monday. The interactive program introduces audience members to the viola. Assistant principal viola Kerri Ryan and master storyteller Charlotte Blake Alston will guide kids on a learning musical journey. Kids can hear stories along with music and sing while pretending to play the string instrument. They can get a close look at the viola, nurturing their fascination and curiosity.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Phila. Orchestra's big night The Philadephia Orchestra has details of its concert and ball at the Academy of Music on Jan. 25. The special guest artist is a real surprise! "Who? Who?" you're asking. You'll never guess. "Who? Who?" you're still asking. It's Jill Scott ! Philly's Grammy-winning singer, songsmith, poet, actress, and Philadelphia High School for Girls alumna! Jill's following in some amazing footsteps: Audra McDonald , Jessye Norman , Kiri Te Kanawa , Itzhak Perlman , and Yo-Yo Ma . Music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin said Jill "is at the absolute top. . . . What a thrill to combine her magnificent voice with our orchestra's Philadelphia Sound.
NEWS
September 13, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BOBBY MARTIN was known as the "Grandaddy of R&B and soul," which meant he was the grandaddy of the Philadelphia Sound. Bobby worked with Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff, founders of Philadelphia International Records, to arrange and produce some of the greatest hits of the 1960s and '70s, as well as with some of the legendary musicians of that era. Robert L. "Bobby" Martin died last Friday. He was 82 and had been living in Hollywood, Calif., since 1980. "He was the greatest arranger," Gamble and Huff said in a statement.
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
SO YOU think you can sing - or dance, or perform spoken word? Are you bold enough to try out for the Apollo Theater's Amateur Night in New York? The producer of that world-famous talent show will be in Philadelphia tomorrow holding auditions at the Kimmel Center, Broad and Spruce streets, starting at 10 a.m. "We're not just relying on discovering that new superstar. We also want to maintain a great entertainment show," said Marion J. Caffey, the Apollo's Amateur Night producer.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
PRINCETON - Were the Philadelphia Orchestra paid by the note, its first Princeton concert since 1964 would have rendered a nice financial windfall. Under guest conductor Mark Laycock, the Wednesday concert at Richardson Auditorium went well over the two hours and was dense with Schumann, Brahms, Prokofiev, and others. Even when played at some exhilaratingly brisk tempos, the music kept everyone on edge in the best possible way in what was an extremely generous and highly successful concert - in live, immediate acoustics that were flattering to the Philadelphia Sound.
NEWS
June 25, 2013
By Allison Vulgamore The Philadelphia Orchestra recently returned from our China residency and 40th anniversary tour. (For sure, it is a relief to see cheesesteaks on the menu!) While we are exhausted, we are also exhilarated. We returned home a changed orchestra - not in sound, but in spirit. We have been deeply touched by the generosity of the Chinese people and moved by the power of our strengthened bond. The Philadelphia Orchestra's first visit to China, 40 years ago, was historic.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN Charles Williams walked down the street in Germantown, his natty attire turned heads. Charles was always well turned-out, and his friendly, outgoing nature charmed people along the way. He greeted his many friends, and even a few who didn't recognize him but felt that here was somebody they'd like to know. Charles Williams, retired security guard for the Federal Reserve and Army veteran of the Korean War, died June 7. He was 82 and was living in the Cliveden Nursing Home, and had lived for many years in Germantown.
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