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NEWS
June 18, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE RECENT upheavals at John Bartram High School in the city's Elmwood section - the brawling in the halls, classroom disruptions, marijuana in the bathrooms - have upset anyone concerned about public education in the city. No one was more concerned than Daryl Gale, city editor and columnist for the Philadelphia Tribune. Bartram was his alma mater. He had been proud of his school. He wanted the best for it, and what was happening pained him deeply. But more than almost anyone, Daryl was in a position to express his pain in public.
NEWS
April 13, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The national office of the NAACP has stepped in to silence a public feud between Philadelphia chapter president J. Whyatt Mondesire and three board members by suspending all of them. In a brief statement Friday, the national NAACP confirmed that the four members were suspended following an inquiry. "There is an internal administrative process which provides suspended members with a right to appeal," the NAACP said, adding that it would make no other comment on the matter. The suspensions, first reported Friday by the Philadelphia Tribune, were effective April 2, and include board members Donald Birts, the Rev. Elisha Morris, and Sid Booker.
NEWS
April 13, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
THE NAACP's national headquarters has suspended four leaders of the Philadelphia chapter who have been engaged in a public feud about finances. The Philadelphia Tribune reported yesterday the suspensions of local president J. Whyatt Mondesire and board members Sid Booker, Donald "Ducky" Birts and the Rev. Elisha Morris. "The national NAACP has concluded its inquiry into the matters pertaining to the Philadelphia NAACP unit," the 105-year-old civil-rights group said in a statement yesterday.
NEWS
February 7, 1989 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Christopher James Perry was a muscular man with an erect bearing, a commanding voice and a furious sense of destiny. He came to Philadelphia in 1873 from his native Baltimore at age 17. He was determined to be a journalist, despite his father's wish that he study law. He worked at first as a servant but later landed a job writing for the white- owned Philadelphia Mercury about activities in the city's black community. He had been here 10 years before he was able to set up his own hand- operated press at 725 Sansom St. and begin cranking out a weekly single- sheet newspaper.
NEWS
October 29, 1989 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two dozen pickets marched outside the main gate of the Philadelphia Zoo yesterday to protest what they described as a scarcity of blacks and other minorities in better positions at the zoo. "We're concerned about racism," said W.T.M. Johnson, 68, a senior research scientist at the Penrose Research Laboratory of the zoo, whose own sign read, "America's first zoo: Rotten with racism. " Johnson said the pickets had been goaded into action by what they saw - of 40 top positions, five are held by blacks at the zoo, according to figures Johnson compiled - and what they heard.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | By Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writer
Goode news - for readers of the Philadelphia Tribune. Beginning tomorrow, Mayor Goode will write an every-other-Friday column in the Tribune, the nation's oldest African-American paper in continuous publication. Tribune editor Paul Bennett said the column grew out of discussions that began in May. "The mayor and I had been engaged in ongoing dialogue about our columnist Leon Williams, who is consistently critical of Mayor Goode," Bennett said, explaining that "If the mayor says the sky is blue, Leon would disagree.
NEWS
August 29, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
PHILADELPHIA photographer Jack T. Franklin told the story of the 1963 March on Washington from almost every angle. There are photos of city political heavyweights, lawyers Cecil B. Moore and Charles Bowser, riding on a train to the march. And there are photos of ordinary Philadelphians, black and white, sitting next to each other on a train seat. One shows two women seated with a young girl, about 4 or 5 years old. The girl's face is not smiling, not fearful, but full of anticipation.
NEWS
November 21, 2008 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kendall Wilson, 73, an award-winning reporter for the Philadelphia Tribune, died of congestive heart failure Monday at his home in Southwest Philadelphia. He began with the Tribune in 1985 and retired from there in 2004. Mr. Wilson won the National Newspaper Publishers Association's A. Philip Randolph Award in 1998 for his series on the struggles of African American family-owned funeral homes to avoid corporate takeovers, according to his daughter Kendra Thomas. In 2005, the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists gave Mr. Wilson its lifetime achievement award.
NEWS
September 12, 2013
The passing of radio journalist E. Steven Collins, who died this week at the age of 58, deepens a hole in mainstream media coverage of Philadelphia's African American community that the rest of the city needs to understand. Philadelphia was once blessed with daily newspaper columns by exceptional writers - Art Peters, Acel Moore, Chuck Stone, Claude Lewis, Elmer Smith, and others - who eschewed political and commercial ambitions to eloquently convey black Philadelphians' fears, aspirations, and successes.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1994 | By Michael L. Rozansky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than a century ago, 28-year-old Christopher J. Perry Sr. left his job in the "colored department" of the Sunday Mercury, which devoted one column a week to the lives of Philadelphia's black residents. In November 1884, he started his own newspaper, calling it the Tribune. "For my people to make progress," Perry said, "they must have a newspaper through which they can speak out against injustice. " One hundred ten years later, the Tribune endures as the oldest continuously published black newspaper in the United States.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 18, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE RECENT upheavals at John Bartram High School in the city's Elmwood section - the brawling in the halls, classroom disruptions, marijuana in the bathrooms - have upset anyone concerned about public education in the city. No one was more concerned than Daryl Gale, city editor and columnist for the Philadelphia Tribune. Bartram was his alma mater. He had been proud of his school. He wanted the best for it, and what was happening pained him deeply. But more than almost anyone, Daryl was in a position to express his pain in public.
NEWS
April 13, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
THE NAACP's national headquarters has suspended four leaders of the Philadelphia chapter who have been engaged in a public feud about finances. The Philadelphia Tribune reported yesterday the suspensions of local president J. Whyatt Mondesire and board members Sid Booker, Donald "Ducky" Birts and the Rev. Elisha Morris. "The national NAACP has concluded its inquiry into the matters pertaining to the Philadelphia NAACP unit," the 105-year-old civil-rights group said in a statement yesterday.
NEWS
April 13, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The national office of the NAACP has stepped in to silence a public feud between Philadelphia chapter president J. Whyatt Mondesire and three board members by suspending all of them. In a brief statement Friday, the national NAACP confirmed that the four members were suspended following an inquiry. "There is an internal administrative process which provides suspended members with a right to appeal," the NAACP said, adding that it would make no other comment on the matter. The suspensions, first reported Friday by the Philadelphia Tribune, were effective April 2, and include board members Donald Birts, the Rev. Elisha Morris, and Sid Booker.
NEWS
March 18, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert Mitchell Thomas, 91, of Philadelphia, a decorated World War II veteran and public relations specialist in the area for many years, died Tuesday, March 11, at the Bryn Mawr Extended Care Center. Over the years, Mr. Thomas worked at a senior level in public affairs for the former SmithKline Beecham, the Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce, the City of Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations, Spiro & Associates, and Moore College of Art. But by far his favorite employer was Gino's Restaurants, based in King of Prussia, he told his son Reynald M. In 1959, Baltimore Colts defensive end Gino Marchetti joined with several teammates to open a fast-food restaurant.
NEWS
October 14, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writermorrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN CHAD Lassiter was a senior at Olney High School in 1986, speakers showed up to talk about Black History Month. Often, such presentations can be more of the same old same old, but one speaker had him sitting up in his seat. City Councilwoman Augusta A. "Gussie" Clark told the students how to give back to the community and, perhaps most important, never to give up. "I was listening to a woman who was sincere, who was genuine, an amazing human being," said Lassiter, director of recovery for Red Cross House, an emergency shelter.
NEWS
September 12, 2013
The passing of radio journalist E. Steven Collins, who died this week at the age of 58, deepens a hole in mainstream media coverage of Philadelphia's African American community that the rest of the city needs to understand. Philadelphia was once blessed with daily newspaper columns by exceptional writers - Art Peters, Acel Moore, Chuck Stone, Claude Lewis, Elmer Smith, and others - who eschewed political and commercial ambitions to eloquently convey black Philadelphians' fears, aspirations, and successes.
NEWS
August 29, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
PHILADELPHIA photographer Jack T. Franklin told the story of the 1963 March on Washington from almost every angle. There are photos of city political heavyweights, lawyers Cecil B. Moore and Charles Bowser, riding on a train to the march. And there are photos of ordinary Philadelphians, black and white, sitting next to each other on a train seat. One shows two women seated with a young girl, about 4 or 5 years old. The girl's face is not smiling, not fearful, but full of anticipation.
NEWS
June 1, 2009 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Christopher J. Perry launched the Philadelphia Tribune, he faced a readership problem that makes today's newspaper industry woes seem trivial. The Tribune was founded in 1884, when the city had only 108,000 African Americans, few of them literate. Blacks "were forbidden to learn to read and write," said Robert W. Bogle, current publisher of the nation's oldest continuously published African American newspaper. "But Chris thought those who were educated could pass the word on. " Bogle and an array of dignitaries including Mayor Nutter and U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter yesterday launched a year-long celebration of the Tribune's 125th anniversary.
NEWS
November 21, 2008 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kendall Wilson, 73, an award-winning reporter for the Philadelphia Tribune, died of congestive heart failure Monday at his home in Southwest Philadelphia. He began with the Tribune in 1985 and retired from there in 2004. Mr. Wilson won the National Newspaper Publishers Association's A. Philip Randolph Award in 1998 for his series on the struggles of African American family-owned funeral homes to avoid corporate takeovers, according to his daughter Kendra Thomas. In 2005, the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists gave Mr. Wilson its lifetime achievement award.
NEWS
December 11, 2002 | By ELMER SMITH
I TRIED TO sit this one out. It was like the first time I overheard an argument between my daughter and her husband. I just wanted to get out of earshot until the thing blew over. But the Coalition for Fair News Coverage boycott of the Daily News is not about to blow over. So it's time for me to fish or cut bait. Their boycott, prompted mainly by the August paper where the Daily News ran a front-page rogues gallery of 15 "fugitives" charged with murder, points up some disturbing lapses in judgment and an alarming lack of diligence on this newspaper's part.
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