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NEWS
May 28, 2003
IN HIS recent column on the future of the city, Michael Smerconish makes the wrong diagnosis and prescribes the wrong medicine for Philadelphia. All across America, cities written off as dead are springing back to life as people tire of maintaining their backyards and rediscover city life. In the last decade, Boston and Chicago have reversed their history of population decline, and Newark's decline has slowed to a trickle. The same trends will reach the Delaware Valley, although perhaps not as quickly as we would like.
NEWS
June 16, 2011
By Donn Scott The central Delaware River waterfront has been a focus of economic development in Philadelphia and the region for centuries. From the construction of Delaware Avenue at the behest of Stephen Girard to the creation of a shared railroad giving businesses equal access to the river, Philadelphia's government has long recognized the riverfront as an economic center. Previous investments in the waterfront were meant to keep Philadelphia competitive with other American cities as a commercial center.
NEWS
August 7, 2008 | By ERIC KARLAN
AS A SENIOR in college, the "real world" is fast approaching. And one question sits on all seniors' minds: Where will I be living this time next year? Many of my peers love the idea of the "New York experience. " The Big Apple's larger-than-life aura is dreamlike - avenue after avenue of bright lights with no off switch. To me, it seems nightmarish. What about the sky-high rents, the congestion, the noise? I recently spent a week in "the city. " Sure, it was fun, but I quickly reached my limit.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | BY JONATHAN A. SAIDEL
'You can never plan the future by the past," said Edmund Burke. Too often, however, government plans for the future are based only on past experiences. When government does look forward, it may be for only one budget cycle. As a departure from this norm, the city controller's office undertook a project to make suggestions for the future based on an analysis of the challenges and opportunities that await Philadelphia in the next century.The product of that project became the book, "Philadelphia: A New Urban Direction.
NEWS
July 22, 2003 | By Michael Bond
Philadelphia is not quite the "shrinkadelphia" one might think it is. Sure, Phoenix is poised to overcome us for the mantle of the nation's fifth-largest city, but the numbers behind it are far more telling. Before Philly is written off as a dying city, consider this: Philadelphia is a very old city and, as such, it is physically much smaller than a newer city such as Phoenix, which has gobbled up adjacent communities through annexation. The 2000 U.S. Census shows that, in the previous decade, Philadelphia's population dropped by 68,027 people, or 4.3 percent, vs. a gain of 337,642 people, or 34.3 percent, for Phoenix.
NEWS
April 21, 2003
IWOULD love to know just what fantasy Philadelphia Commerce Commissioner James Cuorato (OpEd April 17) is living in. Here's a bird's-eye view of what the Street administration has wrought: No relief from the job-crushing, confiscatory wage tax. A seemingly endless supply of new potholes. Assaulting marauders in Northern Liberties. NBA drive-bys on Chestnut Street. Huge budget deficits. Schools, a convention center and a Parking Authority so corrupt and incompetently run that the state has to step in and rescue them.
NEWS
May 28, 2008
I LIVE IN Havertown and rarely go into Philadelphia. On Mother's Day, my girlfriend and I decided to take a walk on West River Drive. Within the space of an hour, I got a ticket for going through a yellow light and was robbed. We'll see about the ticket - I've pleaded not guilty. I was making a left turn from Belmont Avenue onto Montgomery Drive and contend the light was yellow as I started turning behind several other cars. Right after getting the ticket, I parked on Belmont Plateau to walk down to the drive.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1990 | By the Daily News Staff
The tacky 'Twelve Days of Christmas' decorations on Chestnut Street The Mario Lanza Museum TV commercials for Aaron's King of Mattresses The Clothespin sculpture in Center Square The Rocky statue at the Spectrum Cheeseteaks not made with provolone The 'Al Alberts Showcase' Linda Gialanella's wardrobe The Inn of the Twelve Caesars, one of the Tasteless Wonders of the World Admiral Wilson...
NEWS
September 5, 1996 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
First there was Penn. No. No. No. Not the University of Pennsylvania. Of course, it does seem that Penn the college has had more staying power than Penn the man. After all, the college has been around for 241 years. William Penn was here - on and off - for just 19. Still, there wouldn't be a University of Pennsylvania if not for Penn. So give the man his due. He was the founder of the commonwealth that bears his family name. And the lore that has grown up around him over three centuries fits: He was a deeply spiritual man, a Quaker imbued with a strong sense of justice, and one of the great early city planners.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1986 | By MARC MELTZER, Daily News Staff Writer
When it comes to job development in Philadelphia, look to City Hall for direction. That's because it is the City of Philadelphia that is far and away the largest employer in Philadelphia. In fact, different levels of government and public agencies dominate a ranking of the 10 biggest employers in Philadelphia, occuping six positions on the list. Private corporate employers fill only two spots, and the other two are held by institutional employers: the University of Pennsylvania and Temple University.
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