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BUSINESS
July 15, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Scientists, teachers, and finance officers attending three major conventions in June helped drive Center City hotel occupancy rates to a 22-year high for the month, the Philadelphia Convention and Visitors Bureau said Monday. Occupancy reached 89.4 percent in June, the highest June rate since 1993, the bureau said, with hotels booked nearly to full capacity on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, at 97.9 percent and 96.4 percent, respectively. The convention attendance boosted average daily city hotel room rates last month to $213, with the highest rates reported on Mondays, $231 a night, and Tuesdays, $232 a night.
SPORTS
July 15, 2015 | By Jesse Dougherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mahlon Duckett frequently told his daughter, Mahlene Duckett Lee, that he wanted to see more kids playing baseball. Mr. Duckett, who died at age 92 on Sunday night and was the last surviving member of the Philadelphia Stars Negro League baseball team, was glued to the Taney Dragons' Little League World Series run last summer. He regularly spoke about his Negro League experience and its place in American history to students at his alma mater, Overbrook High School. The West Philadelphia native was excited about the renovations to the Marian Anderson Recreation Center, which is where his love for baseball blossomed.
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hadassah, the Women's Zionist Organization of America, is holding its national convention in Philadelphia this week to select a new president and decide advocacy positions. The group, dedicated to women's health issues and supporting elite medical facilities in Israel, has 300,000 members nationally. "We empower women every day to take control of their health," said Patsy Gruenberg, copresident of Hadassah Greater Philadelphia, which represents 10,000 members in the region. About 350 members are attending the convention, which started Monday at the Sheraton Philadelphia Society Hill Hotel and will conclude Wednesday.
NEWS
July 14, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter plans to travel to Germany on Tuesday to sign a "sister city" agreement with the mayor of Frankfurt, the first such pact Philadelphia has entered since 1992. From there he is scheduled to head to Tel Aviv, which signed its own sister-city agreement with Philadelphia in 1967. The six-day trip is part of an ongoing effort to draw international business interest to Philadelphia and, in Israel, to court companies that could base their U.S. headquarters in Philadelphia. "We've made it a priority to have Philadelphia become a more international global city," said Luke Butler, chief of staff to Nutter's deputy mayor for economic development, and a member of the delegation leaving Tuesday.
NEWS
July 14, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
KELVIN NANCE thought he'd be the ideal Philadelphia police officer. After all, his parents are officers in the department. He has a bachelor's degree in criminal justice from Kutztown University, whereas the department merely requires applicants to have 60 college-credit hours. And although applicants must pass a basic physical-fitness test, Nance is fit enough to have won this year's Pennsylvania Golden Gloves boxing tournament in the 165-pound novice class division. But Nance, 25, was rejected for entrance into the Police Academy in September after completing the yearlong application process.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Near the end, after his breathtaking appearance on The Voice - and later, his aching withdrawal from the show - even as he fell deeper into despair and addiction, even as he posed for photographs for fans on the street by day and searched for unlocked cars to sleep in at night, Anthony Riley was singing more beautifully than ever. Originals. Not covers. Songs he could call his own. And not on street corners or in train stations, but in grand rehearsal spaces, where his towering voice echoed through the empty halls, belonging.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Every session of eighth-grade social studies at Newtown Junior High was another chance for Justin, whose family had moved from Lower Moreland to Richboro the previous year, and Erica, who had lived in Newtown all her life, to talk. But after school, his most important friendships remained those he'd made in Lower Moreland. When they met up again as sophomores in English at Council Rock High School North, their friendship began stretching beyond school hours, largely through AOL Instant Messenger.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia exports rose 5.6 percent to a record $26.3 billion last year, the U.S. Commerce Department said Thursday. The Philadelphia metro area ranked 11th among U.S. metropolitan areas in 2014, with key exports being chemicals, computer and electronic products, transportation equipment, petroleum and coal products, and machinery. The federal agency said that 42.6 percent of exports went to markets where the United States has trade agreements. Canada, Mexico, the United Kingdom, Belgium, and the Netherlands were the leading destinations.
NEWS
July 11, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
In an extension of its already numerous outreach activities, the Philadelphia Orchestra announced a new partnership Thursday with Carnegie Hall's second youth orchestra, to be formed in 2016. Having already formed the National Youth Orchestra of the USA (NYO-USA) in 2013 for musicians ages 16 to 19, Carnegie Hall is now founding the 80-piece NYO2 for students 14 to 17 who "have been traditionally underserved by local music programs," according to a statement it released. As many as "several dozen" Philadelphia musicians will act as both as coaches and side-by-side players, said Philadelphia Orchestra president and CEO Allison Vulgamore.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2015 | By Zoë Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Communiy development and independent cinema combine in Movies on the Block, a series of free outdoor screenings sponsored by the Philadelphia Film Society and backed by local foundation Fierce Advocacy Fund. PFS established Movies on the Block to increase access to films across the city, adapting existing urban spaces to meet the needs of areas with "chronic concerns," such as gun violence and health issues such as obesity and diabetes. "When movie houses started, it was always a community gathering place," said Allison Koehler, education and programs director at PFS. Now, "a lot of us feel that going to the movies is an individual experience, and we want to bring back movie-going as a gathering place.
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