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NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Joseph W. Cirucci Sr. was growing up near Ninth and Christian Streets in South Philadelphia in the 1930s, there was a saying. "You became either a cop or a fireman, a priest or a burglar," if you lived in that neighborhood, Mr. Cirucci's son, Joseph W. Jr., said. "It was a joke, he used to say," his son said. "He had a real good sense of humor. " Mr. Cirucci became a Philadelphia police officer. On Sunday, May 3, Mr. Cirucci, 87, of Stratford, who joined the Philadelphia Police Department in 1950 and retired in 1975, died of heart and lung problems at home.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia is well-known as medicine central, with one of the nation's highest concentrations of hospitals and specialists. But a new University of Pennsylvania study finds that in health care, as in so many other realms that intersect with economics, there are two Philadelphias. In certain low-income neighborhoods, the Penn researchers counted close to 3,000 adults for every primary-care provider. That translates into some residents having to wait months for an appointment.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN PAUL L. VANCE retired as the first black superintendent of schools in Montgomery County, Maryland, public schools, he thanked his well-wishers "for permitting this poor boy from South Philadelphia to be your leader. " This kind of humility was typical of the character of a man who spent more than 30 years in educational leadership posts from Philadelphia to Washington, D.C. He died Saturday of complications of a stroke at the age of 83. Paul Vance was a civil-rights and political leader in Philadelphia and started his educational career here.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
He was the guy with the deep voice and the hideous blue plaid sports jacket; she was the woman with the large, empathetic eyes and easygoing manner. Lauren and Dennis were both 27, working for Beneficial Bank and living a freewheeling existence: Friday night happy hours, Saturday morning hangovers, their futures blissfully vague. "We both had severe cases of arrested development," Lauren says now. "We still felt so young. " They figured on living together in a few years and getting married sometime after that.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
THE BULLET that found the right side of 24-year-old Gerald Sawyer's head on the night of Jan. 2 was never meant for him, a man and a woman charged in his murder testified yesterday at a preliminary hearing for two of their co-defendants. Municipal Judge James M. DeLeon held the co-defendants - alleged triggerman Wayne Brown-Griffin and Fatima Moses, who faces only gun charges for allegedly hiding Brown-Griffin's gun after the slaying - on all charges after hearing testimony from Brown-Griffin's wife, Tameca Rivera, and Semaj Lemar.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Legendary Philadelphia songwriter and producer Kenneth Gamble, and Comcast cofounder Ralph Roberts and his wife, talk show host Suzanne Roberts, will be honored Wednesday evening with the 2014 Philadelphia Award at a National Constitution Center ceremony. The award, one of the city's highest civic honors, was established in 1921 by Ladies' Home Journal editor Edward W. Bok to acknowledge and encourage community service. In recent years, it has been given to a broad range of Philadelphians, from Philadanco's Joan Myers Brown to philanthropists John and Leigh Middleton.
NEWS
May 6, 2015
I CAN'T SAY Pamela Geller is "happy" a couple of gunmen showed up shooting Sunday at her in-your-face Muhammad Art Exhibit and Cartoon Contest in Garland, Texas, but she must be pleased that it underscored her longtime warning: Islam is dangerous to democracy and to freedom of speech. She has anointed herself a free-speech (some say hate-speech) advocate and she, as the co-founder of the American Freedom Defense Initiative, recently beat SEPTA in court when the transit system tried to ban bus ads it (and others)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2015 | Lauren McCutcheon, The Daily News
The long: Country's oldest performance festival for kids offers live, under-an-hour-each matinee shows - hip-hop violin, contemporary dance, daredevil acrobatics, juggling and the true story of two girls in one lifeboat. The short: Three days, five acts, one local flick. The demo: Pre-K through fifth grade. The free: Daily, rain-or-shine Fun Zone in front of Annenberg Center does craft-making, face-painting, balloon sculpting, drum-playing and hamburger-eating ($5 for a kid's meal)
SPORTS
May 5, 2015 | BY ED BARKOWITZ, Daily News Staff Writer barkowe@phillynews.com
THE ARENA FOOTBALL League prides itself on fan interaction. But this is not what the league had in mind. Following his ejection for a third-quarter fight on Saturday night, Portland defensive back Quincy Butler unintentionally threw his helmet into the Wells Fargo Center stands and hit an unidentified female spectator. It was unclear whether the woman was injured, though she did leave her seat shortly afterward. Just moments before, Butler tangled up with Soul wide receiver Ryan McDaniel, who was blocking Butler downfield.
SPORTS
May 4, 2015 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jaelen Strong, who grew up in Mount Airy and went to West Catholic High, was selected Friday in the third round of the NFL draft by the Houston Texans. Strong, the 70th overall pick, started his college career at Pierce College in Los Angeles before starring the last two seasons at Arizona State. Strong is the son of the late John Rankin, a former Drexel basketball standout and Philadelphia police officer. Rankin died when Strong was 9. Strong has a tattoo of an image of the Philadelphia skyline on his right biceps.
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