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NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
The report crackled over Lt. Russell Moody Jr.'s handheld police radio: Armed males had just committed a home-invasion robbery mere blocks from Temple University's main campus. Moody rushed in an unmarked police SUV to the crime scene: a house near 17th and Diamond Streets where, it turned out, five female Temple students lived. One of the university's worst fears - students being the victims of violent crimes - yielded on a recent weekend to a story of personal betrayal. What really happened was a burglary - set up, allegedly, by a best friend of one of the housemates.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawyer Stephen Harmelin leaned over the large encased sheaf of parchment with the pale writing. Next to him, Gov. Corbett did the same. One of the original copies of the Bill of Rights sent by President George Washington to the states in 1789 had seized their attention Monday. In the dim light of a new exhibition at the National Constitution Center, the unassuming visual presence of this rare document held both men for a moment with a kind of mesmerizing diffidence. "You know," Harmelin said to the governor, "if we were a religious society this would be the Ark of the Covenant.
NEWS
December 18, 2014 | By Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Philadelphia prosecutors announced criminal charges Tuesday against two more elected officials swept up in the undercover sting investigation that state Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane had argued could not be successfully prosecuted. District Attorney Seth Williams announced conspiracy, bribery and conflict of interest charges against state Reps. Vanessa Lowery Brown and Ronald G. Waters, both Philadelphia Democrats, for accepting cash from an undercover operative. In announcing the charges, Williams had harsh words for Kane, who he said had to be forced through "judicial intervention" to turn over key documents in the case.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
In the wake of leadership changes and the loss of funding from a major supporter, the Philadelphia Singers has decided to cease operations. The city's pioneering professional chorus will sing its last notes at a May concert, and then the organization will dissolve. The chorus was founded in 1972. The Philadelphia Singers' board voted to shut down after learning in November that the William Penn Foundation had turned down a request for a three-year grant for general support; after its executive director resigned; and in view of $125,000 in debt, said Michael Martin Mills, board vice president.
NEWS
December 17, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Whether the miracle of the first Hanukkah is fact or legend - oil enough for just one day is said to have burned in the Temple lamps for eight - not all Jews agree. But devoutly orthodox Rabbi Abraham Shemtov believes in miracles, and why not? Forty years ago he witnessed a kind of Hanukkah miracle, right on Independence Mall. Better yet, he helped create it, and has watched it spread around the world. On Dec. 14, 1974, Shemtov and four other men of the Lubavitcher sect of Hasidic Judaism gathered on Independence Mall to light what is thought to be the first menorah, or Hanukkah candelabrum, ever illuminated on public property in the world.
SPORTS
December 16, 2014 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
AND NOW, for any Eagles faithful, to hope and to wish. The playoff berth that seemed a fait accompli 2 weeks ago now is tenuous. After consecutive home losses in December by a relatively healthy team, a playoff berth is anything but assured. What the Eagles accomplished last night, besides wasting a monumental comeback in front of a home crowd, is that they forfeited control of their own fate. Now, they need help. But, for argument's sake, we must assume that the Lions lose at Green Bay and/or Chicago.
SPORTS
December 15, 2014 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The most significant of Chip Kelly's 19 wins as Eagles coach came on a Sunday night last December, when the Eagles clinched the NFC East over the Dallas Cowboys in a game that cemented the team's turnaround in Kelly's first season in Philadelphia. One December later, the Eagles are again playing the Cowboys in a Sunday prime-time game. And though the winner will not clinch the division, it will take over first place with only two games remaining. "This game will kind of be like last year's game in Dallas," right tackle Lane Johnson said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2014 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
In a swelling tide of tinsel and Bing Crosby, Hanukkah sometimes seems like a mesh bag of gold foil-wrapped afterthought. Yet the very theme of the Festival of Lights is survival, and the panoply of options for Hanukkah activities in the region demonstrates that this holiday refuses to go quietly into the fake snowy night. Here are some ways to keep the lights burning: Lighting ceremonies. Re-creating those flames that wouldn't quit, lighting ceremonies abound on the eve of the holiday on Tuesday - at sundown at Suburban Square, 6 Coulter Ave., Ardmore (information: 610-896-7560, suburbansquare.com)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia and the poinsettia go back almost 200 years, but the relationship has never been exclusive. It involves a raft of iconic names and institutions in this city's lengthy horticultural history: Bartram's Garden, Col. Robert Carr, Robert Buist Sr., J. Liddon Pennock Jr., and the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. PHS has mounted a small exhibition showcasing the popular "Christmas plant," in all its local connectivity, through Dec. 19 in the society's newly refurbished library.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Plugging into national outrage over the decisions not to indict the white police officers who killed two black men, one in Missouri and the other in New York, local lawmakers and clergy on Monday expressed anger, frustration, and weariness born of a perception that skin prejudice dies hard. "Our lives matter," intoned more than one speaker at a news conference sponsored by the Pennsylvania Legislative Black Caucus at Prince of Peace Baptist Church in Strawberry Mansion. Though police killed Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., and Eric Garner in Staten Island, N.Y., "the real weapons were the courts," where grand juries failed to indict the officers, said Minister Rodney Muhammad, new president of the Philadelphia chapter of the NAACP.
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