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NEWS
July 28, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Maurice Kanbar got headaches from drinking alcohol, he came up with a solution: Skyy Vodka, regular vodka minus the impurities that he said gave him headaches. He also invented the "D-Fuzz-It" sweater comb and a hypodermic needle protector to prevent health-care workers from getting pricked. But the wealthy San Francisco entrepreneur has another claim to fame: He's the godfather of Philadelphia University. He is the biggest donor in the university's history. He gave his alma mater a whopping $21 million during its current capital campaign - more than half the amount the university was aiming to raise.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia judge will preside over the case of the former Montgomery County Republican Party leader accused of assaulting a woman who worked at his law firm. Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice Ronald D. Castille this week approved the appointment of Philadelphia Senior Judge John L. Braxton to handle Robert J. Kerns' case in Montgomery County, Supreme Court spokesman Art Heinz said Wednesday. Castille is expected to issue an order finalizing the appointment by the end of next week, Heinz said.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anne Feild Elder, 92, formerly of Jenkintown, a civic volunteer for a half-century, died Sunday, July 13, of dementia at Rydal Park, a retirement community where she had lived since 2001. Mrs. Elder was born in Enid, Okla., a descendant of pioneers. Her grandfather Richard Feild was part of the famous "land run" - the rush by settlers to claim stakes on land once owned by the Cherokees south of the Oklahoma-Kansas border. Mrs. Elder graduated from Classen High School in Oklahoma City and the University of Oklahoma.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Though Philadelphia seems not to lack classical music concerts or educational opportunities for young artists, Taiwanese pianist Ching-Yun Hu came home to her Academy House apartment one recent summer, wanted to hear live music, and discovered there wasn't any. "I had just come back from my own festival in Taipei," she said. "People were so excited about it, and I thought, 'Why not do something similar here?' " Now, in these sweaty late-July weeks, the festival she founded, the Philadelphia Young Pianist Academy, is in its second year and occupies the Curtis Institute's Field Concert Hall with a series of five concerts Saturday through Aug. 2. They are the most prominent manifestations of an intensive program of master classes and lectures.
SPORTS
July 25, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The clouds had grown dark and menacing late Wednesday as Matt Teesdale reached the tee on his 36th hole at the Philadelphia Open owning a seemingly safe cushion with a 3-stroke lead. But Teesdale needed every stroke of that advantage after a pulled tee shot on the par-3 ninth at Applebrook Golf Club and wound up having to make a four-foot double-bogey putt for a 1-stroke victory in the 110th edition of the Golf Association of Philadelphia major. Teesdale, 23, of Maple Glen, shot morning and afternoon rounds of 3-under-par 68 for a total of 136, edging Merion amateur Michael McDermott.
FOOD
July 25, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Farm 51 was bustling on a Thursday in early July, as neighbors poured into the lush educational farm and market to load up on kale and collards, eggs in delicate shades of beige, cream, and blue, bunches of herbs, and jars of honey. "This is the annual flower show, right here," said Shelly Nieves, who stopped in to buy greens and left with an armful of gifts: a bouquet of flowers and three kinds of sage. It's hard to imagine that when Neal Santos and Andrew Olson moved to the 5100 block of Chester Avenue in West Philadelphia, this space - made up of two lots, one then city-owned, the other long abandoned - was a haven for crime and dumping.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Ride-share" car services such as UberX and Lyft are transforming the taxi business in Philadelphia, and they don't even operate here. Yet. The San Francisco-based ride-share companies connect people looking for a ride with private car owners looking for extra money. Their phone apps allow riders to summon a car, pay for the service, and get a receipt, all electronically. Following a foray into Pittsburgh, where they were welcomed by the mayor and the county executive but banned by state regulators, Philadelphia is a likely target this year, industry insiders say. Philadelphia is the only major Northeastern city where Lyft and UberX have not brought their "disruptive" business model of launching first and seeking permission later.
NEWS
July 20, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
The latest engagement between Israel and Hamas set off loud protests Friday in Center City as hundreds of supporters and critics of the Jewish state rallied outside the Israeli consulate. First to arrive were Israel's supporters, who gathered at 19th Street and JFK Boulevard around midday and began engaging motorists. Among them was Asya Zlatina, 27, who arrived around 1:15 p.m. with a sign that read: "Honk 4 Israel. " Zlatina, who said she hadn't really been involved in a protest before, came after deciding that it would be the least she could do to support Israel.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Its finances are precarious, the mortgage is in foreclosure. Real estate agents are busily showing its home to potential buyers. A possible savior - Philadelphia's Roberts family - might offer a helping hand, but not yet. As the Philadelphia Theatre Company hangs on by a thread, theater leaders say its loss would be a blow - artistically, and to the city. "It's tragic for them, but also to the entire Philadelphia arts community and the idea of an Avenue of the Arts. You lose something like that and you'll need to take the sign down" on the Avenue of the Arts, said playwright Bruce Graham, who has had two plays produced by PTC. Terrence J. Nolen, the Arden Theatre Company's producing artistic director, said the PTC's abiding interest in American theater has made it a pioneer, and "certainly an important theater here in Philadelphia.
SPORTS
July 16, 2014 | By Tim McManus, Inquirer Staff Writer
Being the main attraction of a World TeamTennis club works a little bit differently than it does in other professional sports. It is more akin to a rock star making a special appearance than anything else. A few days before making her debut with the Freedoms, Victoria Azarenka had yet to visit the city. She did not know many of her teammates. But when the world's 10th-ranked player steps on the court Tuesday night at the Villanova Pavilion against the San Diego Aviators, that will matter little for her or anyone else.
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