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NEWS
July 16, 2016 | Lauren Feiner, STAFF WRITER
Marsha Bolnick Bacal, 87, a city advocate and former Inquirer employee, died of cancer on July 3 at the Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Ms. Bacal worked in the Inquirer's promotions department in the 1950s. In 1957, the paper announced her special commendation by the Philadelphia Women in Advertising Exhibition for her booklet on a patrolman hit by a bullet. Later in life, she took on advocacy roles in the city, showing an ongoing passion for Philadelphia and its people. Her family said she pushed for racial integration and drug education in schools in the 1960s and 70s. More recently, she helped found and run the Society Hill Towers Political Action Committee in 2001 to ensure representation for the development she called home for 36 years.
NEWS
July 16, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia judge who presided over the landmark 2012 Catholic clergy sex-abuse trial has been assigned to handle what is expected to be the biggest civil trial in years - the Sept. 6 trial of lawsuits from the deadly 2013 Center City building collapse. Court records show Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina was assigned Thursday to preside over what is expected to be a four-week jury trial of suits against real estate speculator Richard Basciano, several of his companies, the Salvation Army, and others on behalf of six people killed and 13 injured June 5, 2013.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Joining a chorus of critics, Philadelphia Bar Chancellor Gaetan Alfano said Friday that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg erred when she publicly disparaged Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. Ginsburg also issued a statement Friday, calling her remarks "ill-advised" and saying that she regretted making them. A growing number of legal experts said it was inappropriate for a sitting Supreme Court justice, or any judge, to weigh in on a political campaign. "Partisan statements can undermine the public's confidence that a judge will decide cases on the merits as opposed to political considerations," Alfano said on behalf of the 12,000-lawyer Philadelphia Bar Association.
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
In the biggest effort yet to find a cure for HIV, the National Institutes of Health on Wednesday named six large scientific teams, one led by Philadelphia's Wistar Institute and the University of Pennsylvania, to tackle different parts of the challenge. The government will commit $30 million a year for five years to the project. The Philadelphia collaboration will get $4.6 million a year. For years, with the world focused on getting treatment to millions of infected people and preventing further spread of the disease, the notion of a "cure seemed naive and overambitious," said Luis J. Montaner, the director of an HIV laboratory at Wistar, who will share leadership of the Philadelphia team.
SPORTS
July 15, 2016 | By Les Bowen, STAFF WRITER
WITH EAGLES training camp less than two weeks away, the team is eager for the sexual-assault accusation against wide receiver Nelson Agholor to be resolved. A source close to the situation, though not involved in the investigation, said Thursday that he was told Agholor will not be charged. The source also said an announcement to that effect was near. An NJ.com report Thursday said District Attorney Seth Williams is expected to decide on charges against Agholor on Friday - after an investigation by Philadelphia police determined no charges were warranted.
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Emily Babay, STAFF WRITER
Investigators are asking for help finding a man who stole jewelry from a 96-year-old woman in East Mount Airy by pretending to be a utility worker. Police on Tuesday released surveillance footage of the suspect, who got into the woman's home on the 6900 block of Crittenden Street on July 8 by saying he worked for Philadelphia Gas Works. The man told the woman that a gas leak contaminated a water line in the street, and the source of the leak needed to be turned off inside her home, police said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Philly soccer doc When Major League Soccer (MLS) was granting franchises around the country, it overlooked Philly. Local soccer fans were chagrined. But instead of cursing their luck, a small group of dedicated fans banded together to form a group, Sons of Ben, that lobbied hard to get MLS to reconsider our market. Eventually, they helped Philly get its own team, the Philadelphia Union. The work of those valiant few is immortalized in director Jeffrey Bell' s doc, Sons of Ben: The Movie , which will be available July 22 on DVD and all digital and VOD platforms.
NEWS
July 12, 2016 | By Roy Peterson
  Summer is here, and the warm weather has flooded historic Philadelphia with thousands of tourists - everyone from American schoolchildren to international guests. Some locals might scoff at this influx of curious visitors, but not me. Their presence reminds me that I live in a special city. The cobblestone streets that I walk every day were the cornerstones of our nation. And because faith was so important to our nation's founders, it is impossible to explore the City of Brotherly Love without noting the centrality of religious institutions.
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
The Philadelphia Historical Commission declined Friday to place the ground beneath a pair of Frankford Avenue garages on the Philadelphia Register of Historic Places. The unusual application for historic designation asserted that the Mutual Burial Ground of Kensington, an old graveyard actively used from the 1820s to the late 1860s, lay partially beneath 1834-48 Frankford Avenue - the location where developer Ori Feibush plans to knock down garages that stand there and build about 41 residential units.
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School District told the troubled Delaware Valley Charter High School in Logan on Thursday that the school will not receive any payments this month for students and only a partial payment in August - a loss of more than $820,000 that threatens the operation's payroll. Uri Monson, the district's chief financial officer, said the charter's interim CEO was told that the district would be withholding the payments to recover money the charter owes for overbilling for students in past years and failing to make required pension contributions for teachers.
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