CollectionsPhiladelphia
IN THE NEWS

Philadelphia

NEWS
March 23, 2014 | BY ASHLEY KUHN, Daily News Staff Writer kuhna@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
THE ICONIC Channel 6 ZooBalloon will "soar once more" in the Philadelphia skyline following its controlled deflation last month, Mayor Nutter said yesterday. "I am honored to make this announcement and thrilled that we will all have the opportunity to fly in the ZooBalloon, including myself," Nutter said. The harsh winter and heavy snowfall damaged the tethered helium balloon that hovered over the Philadelphia Zoo for more than a decade. Despite efforts to minimize the impact of the volume of snow this winter, immediate deflation was necessary to ensure safety, zoo officials said.
NEWS
March 22, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter announced Thursday the second round of funding for local companies and institutions that are helping develop and grow Philadelphia's startup and tech community. Through the Commerce Department's Startup PHL Call for Ideas, five groups will each receive up to $25,000 to start or further develop programs that promote entrepreneurship in the city. Unlike the Startup PHL Seed Fund, which provides money directly to startup companies, Call for Ideas provides funds to organizations that support entrepreneurs.
NEWS
March 20, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA The influential Philadelphia School Partnership, organized to raise $100 million for high-performing city schools, Tuesday announced it would award $2.6 million more in grants. Its largest gift, $2 million over four years, will support Building 21, a Philadelphia School District high school slated to open in September. The school - which will eventually educate 600 students in the former Ferguson Elementary building on North Seventh Street - will use "competency-based" curriculum that allows students to progress once they show mastery of skills.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Melissa rushed from her Neshaminy School District teaching job to the November 2009 United Synagogue Youth Conference, held in Merion Station that year, where members of the high school youth group she advised were waiting. She made it just in time for the Friday sundown service. After Shabbat dinner, she smiled at all the familiar faces, and noticed another, handsome and unknown. Perhaps he was an Israeli, brought in to talk to the USY members about life in Israel?
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
IT TURNS OUT Steven Beisher is going on an unplanned date after all, first with a judge and then to a jail cell - and the Port Richmond resident won't be getting lucky. Authorities say Beisher, 42, set up a fake online ad seeking homosexual sex in 2012, then blackmailed the married man who responded, extorting nearly $2,000 from the man before the victim contacted police. The New Jersey Attorney General's Office said the victim responded to the Craigslist ad in August 2012, replying with a naked photo of himself.
NEWS
March 18, 2014 | By Amelia Brust, Inquirer Staff Writer
Awaiting her first public appearance Sunday as Miss Philadelphia 2014 - in the St. Patrick's Day Parade - Diamond Edmonds was still aglow with post-pageant euphoria. "It's just a feeling of accomplishment," said the 24-year-old teacher and North Philadelphia native who was first runner-up in last year's contest. "I worked hard and then I finally got it. " She won Saturday's competition at the University of the Arts with a crowd-pleasing tap routine to Michael Jackson music. "She brought the house down," said Mary Kaye Jacono Anthony, co-executive director of the Miss Philadelphia Scholarship Committee and a former Miss Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Leonard Bogdanoff, 83, of Elkins Park, a violist with the Philadelphia Orchestra for a half-century, died Friday, March 15, at his home. Colleagues said Mr. Bogdanoff personified the best qualities of the orchestra's old guard. "When I think of Leonard, I think of the kindness in dealing with all of the other members of the viola section. He was just very fair," said Pamela Faye, a substitute violist with the orchestra and a frequent stand partner of Mr. Bogdanoff's. "You can have people who can make or break a section, and he was one of the ones who gave a positive influence, sound-wise, stylistically, all of it. That was really an inspiration to me. " Retired orchestra member Louis Lanza, who as a second violinist sat not far from Mr. Bogdanoff, called him "a very steady player, very accurate, and just a wonderful musician.
NEWS
March 16, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Although perfectly congenial, the Philadelphia Orchestra's high-concept program was up around the ozone Thursday when the Fauré Requiem was preceded by a succession of composers that spanned three centuries and as many nationalities - for no clear reason. Not knowing the connecting thread isn't a bad thing: Such things can reveal themselves over time. Hitting so many musical bases, though, translated into less cumulative impact, despite superb performances under guest conductor Alain Altinoglu.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
Sharon Corr, of the Irish band the Corrs, appreciates the way Americans celebrate St. Patrick's Day. "It's a huge celebration, and I don't really believe in under-doing anything. If you're going to do something, do it big, and that's what you guys do, which I think is really, really great. We [Irish] do have that great heritage of great art, great music, so it's good to celebrate. " Saturday night offers a convergence of opportunities to explore Irish music of several shades of green, from Corr's own debut solo appearance at World Cafe Live to the Philly-based Irish American band Solas at Wilmington's Grand Opera House to Celtic Nights' celebration of traditional step-dancing and music at the Annenberg.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Philadelphia is a city that is all too willing to squander its assets. We've hacked away entire blocks of Center City for parking lots, leveled Frank Furness' greatest buildings, and stripped our neighborhoods of their stately banks and churches. We're so blase about our past, we've even razed the houses where the city's founder and the nation's first president lived. The destruction has proceeded at a slow, steady pace for more than half a century, and yet we never seem to learn from our mistakes.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|