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NEWS
June 20, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Immigrants in the suburbs appear "less skeptical of Philadelphia's assets" than their native-born neighbors, a new report on the region's foreign-born finds. These immigrants are "more bullish on the city than might be expected," given that they reside outside it, said Amanda Bergson-Shilcock, a principal author of "Choosing Philadelphia: Attracting and Retaining Immigrant Newcomers," released Wednesday by the Welcoming Center for New Pennsylvanians. The Philadelphia-based nonprofit, founded in 2003, is rooted in the belief that a steady influx of immigrants can do for the local economy what it has already done for the population - grow it. The center provides training and employment services for immigrants who are here legally.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Claire Dickson will start her summer vacation as usual at the end of this month, but when it's over she will not reopen her eponymous women's boutique the second week in August as she's done for 35 years. Dickson, one of the area's czarinas of special-occasion fashion, has decided to retire. And her daughter and business partner, Debbie, wants to spend more time with her teenage daughter. Rather than look for a replacement, Dickson is calling it quits. There is canasta to be played.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2014 | By Zoë Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maya Lang's debut novel, The Sixteenth of June , is a literary bridge between the City of Brotherly Love and James Joyce's enigmatic masterpiece Ulysses . Set in Philadelphia, Lang's book follows a pair of brothers (and the younger brother's fiancée) through a single day, the Joycean holiday of Bloomsday, June 16, from their grandmother's funeral in the morning to their parents' extravagant Bloomsday fete in the evening, a perennial affair at the family's Delancey manse.
NEWS
June 18, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE RECENT upheavals at John Bartram High School in the city's Elmwood section - the brawling in the halls, classroom disruptions, marijuana in the bathrooms - have upset anyone concerned about public education in the city. No one was more concerned than Daryl Gale, city editor and columnist for the Philadelphia Tribune. Bartram was his alma mater. He had been proud of his school. He wanted the best for it, and what was happening pained him deeply. But more than almost anyone, Daryl was in a position to express his pain in public.
NEWS
June 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul Lewis, 86, of Wyndmoor, a longtime counselor at Community College of Philadelphia, died Thursday, June 5, of complications from dementia at Gwynedd Square Nursing Center. Mr. Lewis was born in Philadelphia and raised in Jenkintown. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps when he was 17, although induction took place a year later. After being honorably discharged, he attended Temple University on the G.I. Bill, earning a bachelor of science degree in business administration. He worked in private industry and for the City of Philadelphia's Personnel Department for a total of 10 years.
NEWS
June 16, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
THE FATE of a federal death-row inmate, who strangled his cellmate in a central Pennsylvanian penitentiary 18 years ago and who has made national headlines, is now in the hands of a federal judge in Philadelphia. David Paul Hammer, an Oklahoma native who is housed on death row in the U.S. penitentiary in Terre Haute, Ind., has been appearing via video link in a Philadelphia courtroom for a resentencing hearing before U.S. District Judge Joel Slomsky during the last two weeks. His death sentence was vacated by a different judge in 2005.
SPORTS
June 16, 2014 | By Max Cohen, Inquirer Staff Writer
There was no elaborate celebration for Jeff Osberg when his opponent, Nelson Hargrove, missed a putt on the ninth hole at the White Manor Country Club on Saturday. Instead, he casually walked over to shake his opponent's hand before calmly walking over to his friends and family. The celebration reflected the manner in which Osberg captured the 114th Philadelphia Amateur Championship. He left little room for drama. The 29-year-old from West Chester needed just 27 holes in the 36-hole match-play championship round to eliminate Hargrove, 10 and 9. Finishing off his opponent early was nothing new for the ninth-seeded Osberg.
NEWS
June 14, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
The next time Lorie Surnitsky drives by what she calls her "gateway" to Philadelphia, she'll see two brand-new American flags flying high. On Thursday afternoon, just two days before Flag Day, the shameful pair of torn and tattered flags displayed over the 2100 Parkway Apartments was switched out for new ones. The Moore College of Art and Design professor had been trying to get them replaced since February. After her battle was chronicled Thursday in The Inquirer, several offers came her way. When she checked her in-box in the morning, she found an e-mail from U.S. Rep. Robert Brady's office awaiting her. The Democrat from Philadelphia wanted to give her two new flags for the former administration building of the School District of Philadelphia.
SPORTS
June 13, 2014 | By Tim McManus, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jeff Osberg reached into his wallet and pulled out tip money for his caddie. A $2 bill fluttered loose, and he tried to hand to it to his wife, Blaire. She would have none of it. Osberg's semifinal victory Wednesday at the Philadelphia Amateur Championship meant he would need to hold on to the good-luck charm a little longer. The ninth-seeded Osberg, who defeated Ray Thompson, 5 and 4, will play Nelson Hargrove, a 5 and 4 winner against Ben Feld, in the 36-hole final Saturday at White Manor Country Club.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lorie Surnitsky's husband likes to call her the flag police. She wouldn't go that far. But at 74, she's someone who still takes the time to look up at a flag and remember what it stands for. Two American flags in particular are hurting her sense of national pride. They fly on the 2100 Parkway Apartments on 21st and Winter Streets - a gateway, she says, to the historic city. And they're torn and tattered, barely recognizable, more like tissue paper than the Stars and Stripes.
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