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NEWS
April 9, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
By Stefanie F. Seldin and Jay Spector Jose Gonzalez, 23, dropped out of high school in 10th grade. He was fortunate to find Project WOW, a property-maintenance skills and GED-preparatory program for young people without a high school diploma run by JEVS Human Services. Gonzalez and his classmates volunteer for Rebuilding Together Philadelphia, a nonprofit that renovates owner-occupied homes for low-income families. Project WOW (World of Work) students and other Philadelphia tech students are regulars at block builds, where Rebuilding Together Philadelphia repairs 20 to 25 homes in a single neighborhood over several days.
SPORTS
April 9, 2016 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doug Pederson's first time as head coach on the Eagles sideline will come at Lincoln Financial Field. The Eagles' preseason schedule, announced in part Thursday, begins when they host the Tampa Bay Buccaneers between Aug. 11 and 15. The exact date will be announced in the coming weeks. The Bucs beat the Eagles in Philadelphia when the teams met last November. The second and third games require the Eagles to travel. They will visit the Pittsburgh Steelers for Week 2, between Aug. 18 and 22. The Eagles also play the Steelers during the regular season, so the intrastate preseason game might have an even more vanilla game plan than usual.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Aramark has decided to keep its global headquarters in Philadelphia, ending speculation that the food- and facilities-services giant may decamp to another city with its jobs and prestige. The company is not yet sure whether it will remain at its namesake headquarters tower at 1101 Market St. or move to another building, but it has concluded that Philadelphia's business costs, talent supply, transportation links, and other advantages will keep it in town, communications chief Tod MacKenzie said in an interview ahead of Thursday's announcement.
NEWS
April 8, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, STAFF WRITER
The number of unemployed people in the wider region - Philadelphia, surrounding counties in Pennsylvania and New Jersey and parts of Delaware and Maryland - grew by 800 in February to 150,200, while the unemployment rate stayed the same, at 4.8 percent, the U.S. Labor Department reported Wednesday. Breaking it into smaller regions, the number of unemployed people rose by 600 to 30,900 in Camden, Gloucester and Burlington counties, with the rate climbing from 4.7 percent to 4.8 percent.
NEWS
April 7, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Maybe the Democrats are the party of working people, said Richard Trumka, leader of the nation's largest federation, the AFL-CIO. But "look how easy it has been for Donald Trump to tap into the justifiable anger" of Americans living paycheck to paycheck, unable to cover a $500 car repair, he told 700 Pennsylvania labor leaders Tuesday at the Pennsylvania AFL-CIO's convention in Philadelphia. "But we can't be fooled," he added. "Trump isn't interested in solving our problems. " And so it began Tuesday, three weeks from Pennsylvania's primary, as the state's top union leaders exhorted each other - with help from Trumka - to double down on their efforts to elect politicians who "create an economy that works for everybody," he said.
NEWS
April 5, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari and Claudia Vargas, STAFF WRITERS
One is a longtime Philadelphia congressman who quit in 2002. Another worked for U.S. Rep. Robert Brady, the city Democratic leader. A third was a powerful state senator from Delaware County until he went to federal prison. Yet years after they left their public jobs, all remain on the taxpayers' tab - as private lobbyists, paid to promote Philadelphia's interests in Washington and Harrisburg. It's a common arrangement for cities, but one that troubles some watchdogs. "They already have taxpayer-funded lobbyists," said Barry Kauffman, head of the good-government group Common Cause's state chapter.
NEWS
April 5, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
When a Philadelphia grand jury slammed Visit Philadelphia in a March 16 report for quietly settling a $200,000 embezzlement and failing to go to prosecutors, the tourism agency claimed it had little choice. Board chairman Manuel Stamatakis said the alleged embezzler, Joyce Levitt, offered through her lawyer to repay what was taken provided that the agency didn't go to the police. Had the agency reported the theft, Levitt likely would have spent all of her money on legal fees, leaving nothing for the agency.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
Philly should be throwing a parade for Scott Kesterson, or at least buying him a snort of his favorite bourbon, Michter's. It's not every day that a small business moves across the country to Philadelphia. Even more rare is when the owner of that business has no personal ties here. "I never thought I'd be a Northeast guy," said the native of southern Oregon. Research is what led Kesterson, 51, to relocate his Spatial Terra, a four-year-old company specializing in a complex blend of market research, risk-mitigation analysis, and consulting, from Portland - a city often associated with progressiveness - to Philadelphia - a city that consistently does not score well in national rankings of best places for small business.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Winning landmark protection for historic buildings in Philadelphia is no easy thing. But keeping them protected has become even more of an ordeal. It used to be that safeguarding the city's most cherished works of architecture was a cut-and-dried process. If you could prove that a design was worthy, or that something really important had transpired inside, the Historical Commission would list the building on the City Register. People might fiercely disagree about the merits of a nomination, but once a building was on the list, it couldn't be demolished or significantly modified.
NEWS
April 1, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, MUSIC CRITIC
NEW YORK - The joint is jumping, but not necessarily in ways that originally made Ella Fitzgerald famous decades ago. Harlem's Apollo Theater remains a hub of African American musical culture - but the venue also strenuously adapts itself. There's digital foosball one week, with a giant playing table on the main floor - and then Opera Philadelphia arrives this Friday and Sunday for Charlie Parker's Yardbird , the Apollo's first foray into opera. "Experimentation and emerging artists are part of our DNA," says Mikki Shepard, executive producer.
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