CollectionsPhiladelphia
IN THE NEWS

Philadelphia

ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there "No! Are you crazy?" Lisa near-shouted at Chris at the end of their first conversation. Both arrived late for a May 2010 church cleanup that ended hours early. Chris swears his offer to drive her to the Ardmore home where she then worked as an au pair was his way of helping out a new member of Christian Stronghold Baptist Church in West Philadelphia, where the Cheltenham native has attended his whole life. But there was no way Lisa, who had recently moved here from Johannesburg, was getting in a stranger's car. "I didn't want to become a CSI story: This girl came from South Africa . . . three months later, she was dead!
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Symphony orchestra as jukebox? Such was the idea behind the Philadelphia Orchestra's People's Choice concert on Friday at the Mann Center. Some 16 possibilities posted on radio station WRTI-FM's website were subject to open voting, which yielded a good medium-weight concert of Sibelius, Tchaikovsky, Smetana - all classical music greatest hits that, with any luck, gave the audience an increased sense of ownership. Philosophically, it's a fine idea. But having such a concert more than once a year might not be healthy.
NEWS
August 5, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a decaying wooden ship was discovered in the World Trade Center excavation pit four years ago, it posed a mystery. Where did it come from? How did it get there? Was it wrecked? Or was it sunk intentionally for landfill? Archaeologists, maritime experts, and tree-ring researchers last week announced their conclusions: The ship, believed to be a Hudson River sloop, was built shortly after 1773 in the bustling port of Philadelphia. The wood from the ship was matched not just to Philadelphia, but to the same sort of oak trees that were used to build the old State House, where the Declaration of Independence was signed in 1776.
SPORTS
August 3, 2014 | By Tim McManus, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Jeffrey Bussmann began following AS Roma more than a decade ago, finding their games on television was nearly impossible. If he was lucky, he might catch an early morning broadcast on a public station. Thursday, Bussmann stood at the edge of Rhodes Field at Penn, a Roma Club Philadelphia banner draped across the railing. A few feet away, Roma stars Daniele De Rossi and Miralem Pjanic glided across the turf. Italian national team legend Francesco Totti lay face down in the grass, a trainer pulling on the veteran's legs.
SPORTS
August 2, 2014 | By Sara Rayburn, For The Inquirer
Trainer Jimmy Takter has such a prohibitive favorite in Saturday's $1 million Hambletonian at the Meadowlands, that one local owner is surprised he even has a horse in such a prestigious race. "I have tickets for the Billy Joel concert at [Citizens Bank Park], so I had to scramble to rearrange my plans," said Howard Taylor, a lawyer from Philadelphia and co-owner of 20-1 longshot Doncango. "[Winning the Hambletonian] would be a dream. It would be a shock, but it would be a dream," Taylor said.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Becoming a consecrated virgin, says Judith Stegman, means there's one thing you'll do without - obviously - and one you'll definitely need: A sense of humor. In the era of The Bachelorette and Dating Naked , of Fifty Shades of Grey and Snoop Dogg's "Ain't No Fun (If the Homies Can't Have None)," a woman who chooses to live in reverent chastity can seem a curiosity. " 'Are you married?' - it's a common question," Stegman said. "I say, 'Well, I have a ring. I'm a consecrated virgin in the Catholic Church, and that means I'm married to Christ.'" Stegman, 58, is president of the U.S. Association of Consecrated Virgins, dozens of whom gathered Wednesday at the Philadelphia Archdiocese's offices to talk about their lives in advance of a formal convocation in Malvern.
NEWS
August 1, 2014
BEGINNING IN a month or so, local media outlets will be tripping over one other in order to yet again tell the story of how the 1964 Phillies let what seemed to be a mortal lock on the National League pennant and a showdown with the New York Yankees in that year's World Series slip out of their hands. But a South Jersey playwright has already been there and done that. In June, Vineland's Lou Mascolo had his play, "The Year the Phillies Blew the Pennant," staged at the Ashley McCormick Entertainment Center in Bridgeton, N.J. Despite its title, the drama isn't a documentary about the season that horrifically concluded with the infamous 10-game losing streak that ignited the bonfire upon which an entire region's hopes and dreams burned to ashes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there   On her summer 2005 tour of the University of Pittsburgh, Caroline was impressed with the campus, obsessed with the gold-and-navy-blue-striped rugby shirts worn by the student guides called Pathfinders, and determined to become a Pathfinder herself. That fall, she was leaving her first Pathfinders meeting when one of the rowdy sophomores who had hooted and hollered as the new guides introduced themselves walked up to her. "Hi, I'm Alex," he said. Caroline, who grew up in Media, had graduated from the all-girls' Country Day School of the Sacred Heart in Bryn Mawr.
NEWS
July 30, 2014 | BY CINDY STANSBURY, Daily News Staff Writer stansbc@phillynews.com, 215-854-5914
AT FDR PARK in South Philadelphia, hundreds of Muslims prayed in unison yesterday as children jumped gleefully in a moon bounce nearby and the smell of barbecue wafted in the air. Munthir Muhammad's son pulled on his father's arm excitedly, urging him toward the fun. "We don't have Christmas or Easter. This is our holiday," said Muhammad, 40, of Grays Ferry. The gathering was the Eid al-Fitr celebration held by the United Muslim Masjid to mark the end of Ramadan and its 30-day fast.
NEWS
July 30, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 8 a.m. on a Saturday in mid-July, a time many teenagers prefer to be asleep, Mika'al Broadus, a rising senior at Roxborough High School, was already at work at Agatston Urban Nutrition Initiative's University City High School garden, harvesting armfuls of kale. The 17-year-old market manager directed his peers in rinsing, bundling, and weighing the bunches, and loading them onto bike trailers bound for a farmers market. He is still struggling with the possibility that this lush farm may soon be a construction site.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|