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NEWS
December 27, 1992 | By PENNY BALKIN BACH, photos by HOWARD BRUNNER, design by KATZ DESIGN GROUP
This is a sampling from "Public Art in Philadelphia," published this month by Temple University Press with support from the William Penn Foundation. The text is by Penny Balkin Bach, executive director of the Fairmount Park Art Association and design by the Katz Design Group.
NEWS
February 3, 2009
LAST NIGHT, more than 4,000 people slept in shelters across our city. Hundreds more slept in parks and doorways. In difficult economic times, the number of homeless Philadelphians in need of shelter and services only grows. In response to the One Book, One Philadelphia reading of "The Soloist," which looks at how a city treats its most in need, Ready, Willing & Able and the Daily News are seeking essays about homelessness. If you've ever experienced homelessness and want to help Philadelphians understand the challenges you've faced, please submit your essay on the topic "How did you or how will you overcome homelessness?"
NEWS
April 30, 2007
MAYOR Street has said he didn't want to violate people's rights by declaring a crime emergency, or infringe on people's rights by ordering curfews and frisking without cause. But what about the rights of those 406 murdered last year or the 128-plus murdered already this year? What about the rights of those who get shot through their window getting dressed for work? Not once has the mayor made a statement regarding their right to live. Has he even attended the funerals of some of the innocent people killed on his watch?
SPORTS
April 21, 1995 | By Mayer Brandschain, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Philadelphia players beat a team from the Royal Melbourne Tennis Club of Australia, 4-2, in court tennis matches yesterday at the Racquet Club. Melbourne won the No. 1 singles when Ted Cockram rallied to defeat Sam Howe, 5-6, 6-3, 6-1. Winners for Philadelphia were John Madzin, Norris Jordan and Jimmy Knott in singles, and Jamie Dodderidge and Harry Hare in doubles. The Philadelphia pair of Andy Kinzler and Steve Simpson dropped a doubles match to Mike Garnet and Tony Poolman.
NEWS
January 13, 1997 | By Stacia Friedman
In 10th grade, my friend Harriet slipped me a note in algebra class demanding, "From now on, call me Lola. " This came as a surprise. For weeks, she had been leaning toward "Heidi. " I went along with it, but our homeroom teacher dug in her orthopedic heels. Mrs. Kupnick took attendance every morning, calling out "Harriet Himmelwitz?" Lola gazed back in icy silence and was marked absent for the entire semester. That's when I realized that names have power. They change the way we feel about people, places and things.
NEWS
May 1, 2003 | By GREGG MELINSON
PHILADELPHIA HAS lost more than half a million people over the last 50 or so years. Nothing new there. We've gotten used to the steady drumbeat of Census Bureau reports bearing this glum news. If you look more closely at the numbers, though, something pops out at you. The 2000 census shows that we have a peculiar challenge in front of us. Our population has stagnated not, as is generally assumed, because too many people are leaving, but because not enough people - either from other regions or other countries - are arriving.
NEWS
August 5, 2004 | By Keith Forrest
There is a new Philadelphian, living right in my home in Swarthmore. It doesn't happen very often, I'm sure. To be a Philadelphian, you usually need to be born here. My wife, Kris, grew up in the outer reaches of Pennsylvania, near Erie. Out there, all the children are taught that Philadelphia is that big, dirty city, with the cracked bell, that strong-arms all the tax dollars from Harrisburg. I lived in Erie with my wife for several years. As far as I can tell, the tiny city by Lake Erie has the lake, epic amounts of snow, and lots of cloudy days.
SPORTS
January 28, 1987 | By Al Morganti, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although Stars & Stripes is sponsored by the San Diego Yacht Club, there are many times when the only true Californian on the boat is skipper Dennis Conner. In fact, it has become a running joke that Conner goes to the East Coast to get the best crew and support staff. And the Philadelphia area is amply represented. The most prominent Philadelphian is mainsail trimmer Jon Wright of Rosemont, 38, who has become Philly's America's Cup regular. This is Wright's fifth campaign (1974, '77, '80, '83, '87)
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | BY SANDRA SHEA, Daily News Staff Writer sheas@phillynews.com, 215-854-5886
PHILADELPHIANS have strong opinions about the issues facing Philadelphia as well as poverty's causes and solutions. With support from Temple University's Center for Public Interest Journalism, we commissioned a citywide survey from the Insight and Survey Center, a survey-research unit associated with the School of Journalism of the University of Missouri-Columbia and the Reynolds Journalism Institute. Nearly 350 randomly selected people from across the city were phoned. The results of this survey demonstrate that an economically, racially and educationally diverse cross-section of Philadelphians see poverty as one of the most important issues that the city must address to move forward.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
SHENZHEN, China - The earnest young Chinese woman asked the question with a directness uncharacteristic of her world: How do you learn to appreciate Western classical music? She had come to the right place on Wednesday: an open, practical dialogue about symphony orchestra conducting featuring Philadelphia Orchestra associate conductor Cristian Macelaru. His reply: "You don't need to understand anything more than that it's beautiful. Allow yourself to be moved by the same things that move you in Chinese music.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
VATICAN CITY - Pope Francis greeted Mayor Nutter on the steps of St. Peter's Basilica on Wednesday with three fingers raised. "Three months," he said. In three months, the pope visits Philadelphia and greets what organizers say could be 1.5 million people in the biggest event the city has ever hosted. The World Meeting of Families from Sept. 22 to 25 and the papal visit that weekend are projected to give a huge boost to the city's tourism industry and generate a half-billion dollars for city businesses.
SPORTS
May 10, 2015 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Proving that you are never too old, Amir Mansour captured the Pennsylvania State Heavyweight title with a unanimous decision over Joey Dawejko on Friday night at the 2300 Arena. Mansour (21-1), 42, won by 96-94, 98-92 and 97-93 in a fight that saw both fighters draw blood. The loss dropped Dawejko's record to 14-4. Both fighters fight out of Philadelphia. It marked the first time in Dawejko's career that he went 10 rounds. "He came to fight and the kid is a good fighter," said Mansour.
NEWS
March 20, 2015
THE LATEST Pew Philadelphia Poll offers some revealing numbers about what city residents think of the public schools. The short answer is: not much. According to Pew, 77 percent of city residents rate the district's performance as either poor or fair. Only 19 percent rate it as good or excellent. These are depressing numbers about a system with the important and vital job of educating our children. The good news is that Philadelphians seemed to have woken up when it comes to education.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
When Philadelphia's next mayor takes the oath of office inside the glittering Academy of Music, he or she should have a plan to help the city residents who cannot afford to attend a concert, don't have enough food to eat, and do not expect life to get better for them or their children. The next mayor will lead the poorest among the nation's 10 biggest cities. More than a quarter of its 1.5 million residents live in poverty. Thirty-nine percent of its children are poor. There are programs to help, but too many people don't know they qualify.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Symphony orchestras don't typically slot in visits to China in the middle of a busy season. But the Philadelphia Orchestra is in the midst of its Pearl River Delta Residency Week, which slipped into high gear - after more than the usual Chinese cliffhangers - with a performance Wednesday of the choral/orchestral work Ode to Humanity in Macau. "I tell you, the world is getting small," said cellist Udi Bar-David, having recently stepped off a nonstop 15-hour flight from JFK Airport.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin and Rachel Zamzow, For The Inquirer
Philadelphia City Councilman Dennis O'Brien announced plans Monday to close gaps in services for growing populations of people with autism - shortcomings that have long frustrated parents as well as service providers nationwide. At a hearing before a Council subcommittee, leaders in autism services spoke about a range of needs, including smoother transitions across the life span and improved access to care for underserved populations. O'Brien said his plans will address many of their concerns.
NEWS
January 31, 2015 | By Sarah Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphians are more skeptical of snow forecasts for Friday after Tuesday's blizzard-that-wasn't. AccuWeather was calling for one to three inches of snow and a wintry mix for Philadelphia, and even more to the northeast of the city and in New England starting late Thursday and continuing through Friday. But after the storm left Philadelphia mostly untouched this week despite meteorologists' expectations of a foot or more, many people don't quite believe it. "With all this technology, you think they'd predict it right," said Michael Smith, 25, whose Tuesday history class at Community College of Philadelphia was canceled - along with just about everything else in the region.
NEWS
January 21, 2015 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
FOR THE MOTHER of Brandon Tate Brown, a young man gunned down by police last month, yesterday's re-creation of Martin Luther King Jr.'s March on Washington was especially meaningful. Brown, 26, was shot dead Dec. 15 during a traffic stop in the city's Mayfair section after a scuffle with police. Tanya Brown was one of almost a dozen speakers who took to the microphone to address about 6,000 people on Independence Mall and call for change. "I am extremely grateful to be part of an imitation of Martin Luther King's walk," Brown said.
TRAVEL
January 5, 2015 | By Lynne Berman, For The Inquirer
SAN FRANCISCO - I am sitting in a friend's home high in the hills of nearby Tiburon, Calif., thinking how very fortunate I am to be here. From the wall of windows in the rear of the house, I see the garden sloping up to the top of Mount Tiburon. Turning my attention to the windows lining the front rooms, I am met with a fog so dense that not a thing is visible. At times like these, there is such a quiet, mysterious quality to the fog that it is easy to imagine that nothing else exists in the world.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
AFTER LIVING since 1968 in the Logan house owned by her mother and her stepfather, and raising her children there, Deborah Sharper nearly lost it in a sheriff's sale last year because of a tangled title. Her mother died shortly before her stepfather in 1998, so even though Sharper lived in the house and paid the bills, the only legal heir was her stepfather's natural daughter, who had a house of her own. "I was scared to death because I've lived here since I was 13," said Sharper, 60, whose name has never been on the title.
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