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NEWS
December 27, 1992 | By PENNY BALKIN BACH, photos by HOWARD BRUNNER, design by KATZ DESIGN GROUP
This is a sampling from "Public Art in Philadelphia," published this month by Temple University Press with support from the William Penn Foundation. The text is by Penny Balkin Bach, executive director of the Fairmount Park Art Association and design by the Katz Design Group.
NEWS
February 3, 2009
LAST NIGHT, more than 4,000 people slept in shelters across our city. Hundreds more slept in parks and doorways. In difficult economic times, the number of homeless Philadelphians in need of shelter and services only grows. In response to the One Book, One Philadelphia reading of "The Soloist," which looks at how a city treats its most in need, Ready, Willing & Able and the Daily News are seeking essays about homelessness. If you've ever experienced homelessness and want to help Philadelphians understand the challenges you've faced, please submit your essay on the topic "How did you or how will you overcome homelessness?"
NEWS
April 30, 2007
MAYOR Street has said he didn't want to violate people's rights by declaring a crime emergency, or infringe on people's rights by ordering curfews and frisking without cause. But what about the rights of those 406 murdered last year or the 128-plus murdered already this year? What about the rights of those who get shot through their window getting dressed for work? Not once has the mayor made a statement regarding their right to live. Has he even attended the funerals of some of the innocent people killed on his watch?
SPORTS
April 21, 1995 | By Mayer Brandschain, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Philadelphia players beat a team from the Royal Melbourne Tennis Club of Australia, 4-2, in court tennis matches yesterday at the Racquet Club. Melbourne won the No. 1 singles when Ted Cockram rallied to defeat Sam Howe, 5-6, 6-3, 6-1. Winners for Philadelphia were John Madzin, Norris Jordan and Jimmy Knott in singles, and Jamie Dodderidge and Harry Hare in doubles. The Philadelphia pair of Andy Kinzler and Steve Simpson dropped a doubles match to Mike Garnet and Tony Poolman.
NEWS
January 13, 1997 | By Stacia Friedman
In 10th grade, my friend Harriet slipped me a note in algebra class demanding, "From now on, call me Lola. " This came as a surprise. For weeks, she had been leaning toward "Heidi. " I went along with it, but our homeroom teacher dug in her orthopedic heels. Mrs. Kupnick took attendance every morning, calling out "Harriet Himmelwitz?" Lola gazed back in icy silence and was marked absent for the entire semester. That's when I realized that names have power. They change the way we feel about people, places and things.
NEWS
May 1, 2003 | By GREGG MELINSON
PHILADELPHIA HAS lost more than half a million people over the last 50 or so years. Nothing new there. We've gotten used to the steady drumbeat of Census Bureau reports bearing this glum news. If you look more closely at the numbers, though, something pops out at you. The 2000 census shows that we have a peculiar challenge in front of us. Our population has stagnated not, as is generally assumed, because too many people are leaving, but because not enough people - either from other regions or other countries - are arriving.
NEWS
August 5, 2004 | By Keith Forrest
There is a new Philadelphian, living right in my home in Swarthmore. It doesn't happen very often, I'm sure. To be a Philadelphian, you usually need to be born here. My wife, Kris, grew up in the outer reaches of Pennsylvania, near Erie. Out there, all the children are taught that Philadelphia is that big, dirty city, with the cracked bell, that strong-arms all the tax dollars from Harrisburg. I lived in Erie with my wife for several years. As far as I can tell, the tiny city by Lake Erie has the lake, epic amounts of snow, and lots of cloudy days.
SPORTS
January 28, 1987 | By Al Morganti, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although Stars & Stripes is sponsored by the San Diego Yacht Club, there are many times when the only true Californian on the boat is skipper Dennis Conner. In fact, it has become a running joke that Conner goes to the East Coast to get the best crew and support staff. And the Philadelphia area is amply represented. The most prominent Philadelphian is mainsail trimmer Jon Wright of Rosemont, 38, who has become Philly's America's Cup regular. This is Wright's fifth campaign (1974, '77, '80, '83, '87)
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | BY SANDRA SHEA, Daily News Staff Writer sheas@phillynews.com, 215-854-5886
PHILADELPHIANS have strong opinions about the issues facing Philadelphia as well as poverty's causes and solutions. With support from Temple University's Center for Public Interest Journalism, we commissioned a citywide survey from the Insight and Survey Center, a survey-research unit associated with the School of Journalism of the University of Missouri-Columbia and the Reynolds Journalism Institute. Nearly 350 randomly selected people from across the city were phoned. The results of this survey demonstrate that an economically, racially and educationally diverse cross-section of Philadelphians see poverty as one of the most important issues that the city must address to move forward.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
SHENZHEN, China - The earnest young Chinese woman asked the question with a directness uncharacteristic of her world: How do you learn to appreciate Western classical music? She had come to the right place on Wednesday: an open, practical dialogue about symphony orchestra conducting featuring Philadelphia Orchestra associate conductor Cristian Macelaru. His reply: "You don't need to understand anything more than that it's beautiful. Allow yourself to be moved by the same things that move you in Chinese music.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
AFTER LIVING since 1968 in the Logan house owned by her mother and her stepfather, and raising her children there, Deborah Sharper nearly lost it in a sheriff's sale last year because of a tangled title. Her mother died shortly before her stepfather in 1998, so even though Sharper lived in the house and paid the bills, the only legal heir was her stepfather's natural daughter, who had a house of her own. "I was scared to death because I've lived here since I was 13," said Sharper, 60, whose name has never been on the title.
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter. - Unknown That comment, often wrongly attributed to Winston Churchill, sums up quite a few responses when an elected school board is suggested for Philadelphia. That's understandable. One need spend only a few minutes thinking about the boss-driven, corruption-generating political system that democracy has produced in this city to decide it doesn't need any more of that. But such pessimism suggests that Philadelphians are incapable of what people in other cities and towns across America are doing, which is finding a way to maneuver through their own political cesspools to provide for the education of their children.
TRAVEL
October 20, 2014 | By Jessica Miller, For The Inquirer
I lifted my backpack to my knees, shuffling everything inside it until I found my headphones and sketch pad. I needed these objects to distract me from hearing the man in front of me, belting out the Portuguese song playing on his iPod. Along with the other bewildered passengers at my sides, I couldn't resist releasing a giggle and smiling in the direction of my feet. I could catch a glimpse of the singing man through his reflection in the window. He appeared to be energized, and he sang with his eyes tightly shut.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Take 100 Philadelphians drawn from every age group, ethnicity, and neighborhood, put them on a theater stage, and have them share stories about their lives. Sheer madness? Pure cacophony? Try a piece of cutting-edge theater. And a fascinating one at that. Called 100% Philadelphia , the FringeArts production will stage three performances, Friday through Sunday, at Temple Performing Arts Center. And yes, each will be an evening of storytelling, show-and-tells, and audience Q&As featuring 100 ordinary Philadelphians ranging in age from 2 months to 81 years.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania law is clear: Defendants must be jailed for at least two months if caught driving after their license has been suspended for a DUI conviction. But that's not what happens most of the time in Philadelphia. While city police issue about 800 tickets for driving on so-called DUI-suspended licenses every year, fewer than one in five sticks. The rest of the defendants have their cases dismissed or they simply flee, court records show, taking advantage of years of Traffic Court disarray.
NEWS
July 15, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
DONNY SMITH, president of the Mayfair Civic Association, wants to split the sprawling 15th Police District into two districts, with a guaranteed number of officers patrolling each neighborhood. Right now, Smith said, the quieter neighborhoods like his suffer quality-of-life crimes, such as theft when cops are busy responding to the 15th's high-crime areas. "We're a blue-collar neighborhood," Smith said. "People are at work all day. They don't want to come home to find their house was broken into because there aren't enough police patrolling the streets here.
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
THE CITY yesterday opened six BenePhilly Centers to assist low-income Philadelphians who are eligible for benefits but are not receiving them. Increasing benefits access is a major goal of Shared Prosperity, an anti-poverty plan that Mayor Nutter unveiled last year. He tasked Eva Gladstein, executive director of the Mayor's Office of Community Empowerment and Opportunity, with creating and implementing the plan. The centers, Gladstein said, will help people "get benefits that can help alleviate some of the worst effects of poverty.
NEWS
July 9, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IN 1900, William McKinley was president. American soldiers were battling rebels in the Philippines. Orville and Wilbur Wright were tinkering with a contraption that was supposed to fly through the air, and Henry Ford was tinkering with the Model T, to be introduced in eight years and revolutionize American travel. And Anna Lois Berrian was born. Rural Georgia, her birthplace, was farm country, cotton and tobacco, and a place where black people knew their place, or paid dearly for not knowing it. In fact, it was the lynching of a young black man that was the main impetus for Anna's move to Philadelphia at age 22. Anna, who became Anna Henderson after marrying railroad worker Rembert Louis Henderson in 1925, became a much-honored and highly revered resident of West Philadelphia.
SPORTS
June 2, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
It's hard to imagine blue-collar Philadelphia sports fans, as impatient, boisterous and passionate as they can be, paying to watch people walk in circles for days on end. But for a brief period in the 1880s and early 1890s, when spectating options were as sparse as clean-shaven faces, our athletic-loving ancestors apparently found these marathons of monotony compelling. Competitive walking - or pedestrianism, as it then was called - briefly was the equal of baseball, horse racing, and rowing, particularly in large eastern cities like New York, Boston, and Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
SHENZHEN, China - The earnest young Chinese woman asked the question with a directness uncharacteristic of her world: How do you learn to appreciate Western classical music? She had come to the right place on Wednesday: an open, practical dialogue about symphony orchestra conducting featuring Philadelphia Orchestra associate conductor Cristian Macelaru. His reply: "You don't need to understand anything more than that it's beautiful. Allow yourself to be moved by the same things that move you in Chinese music.
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