CollectionsPhiladelphians
IN THE NEWS

Philadelphians

NEWS
March 2, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
When Philadelphia's next mayor takes the oath of office inside the glittering Academy of Music, he or she should have a plan to help the city residents who cannot afford to attend a concert, don't have enough food to eat, and do not expect life to get better for them or their children. The next mayor will lead the poorest among the nation's 10 biggest cities. More than a quarter of its 1.5 million residents live in poverty. Thirty-nine percent of its children are poor. There are programs to help, but too many people don't know they qualify.
NEWS
June 4, 2012
WHEN POPE John Paul II spent two days in Philadelphia in October 1979, more than a million people turned out to see and cheer him. Daily News editorial writers, caught in the spirit of the occasion, abandoned politics, city-budget problems, crime and the other usual subjects of their wise analysis, and waxed eloquent over the Pontiff's visit. Here are some excerpts: "The triumphant visit of Pope John Paul II was one of Philadelphia's finest hours. No matter what part of the city you live in, no matter whether you are a Catholic or not, you couldn't help but be swept away by the excitement, the emotion and the air of exhilaration that cradled this city for 48 hours.
NEWS
April 8, 2013 | By Clark DeLeon
Like most Philadelphia natives, I know the sound of a Philadelphia accent: "So I tollum straight up, 'Yo, Paulie, your sister's wit me. And we're gawna ride widges down-ashore or this car don't make it past Pashunk Avenue!' " And like most Philadelphia natives, I don't hear any accent in my voice when ordering kawfee at the Melrose or wooder ice at Rita's. Yanohwaddamean? Seriously, me? An accent? Fuhgeddaboudit. Nevertheless, I was disturbed by the recent headline "The Strange Decline of the Philly Accent" in the Atlantic magazine's online site, theatlanticcities.com.
NEWS
August 25, 2010 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Mike Monteiro grew up in Olney and attended Holy Child on North Broad, Central, Temple's Tyler School of Art. Then, as many creative types are wont to do, he fled West. In California, the Web designer noticed people are, well, different. They adopt a decidedly more placid approach to life in the Golden State. At the DMV, which can bring out the ornery in people and Philadelphians in particular, the San Francisco clerk inquired: "Why are you so angry?" To which Monteiro answered, "I'm not angry, I'm from Philly.
NEWS
October 14, 2012
Two weeks ago, I introduced you to some Philadelphians I consider to be disruptive - innovative change agents who challenge the status quo in their respective fields. Since then, you've e-mailed me a lot of other names. Some - such as fiscal watchdog Brett Mandel and mural maven Jane Golden - are no-brainers. In a town long characterized by a go-along-to-get-along culture, they have the guts to stand up and stand out. I've been most intrigued, however, by the disrupters who have been operating below the media radar.
NEWS
September 25, 2012
Chattanooga, Tenn., is trying to lure techies with financial incentives, but some Philadelphians are not impressed. Business, A14.
NEWS
December 19, 2012
PHILADELPHIA is beautiful, clean, safe and tolerant. Stop laughing! I'm not saying it and probably neither are you. Philadelphians often are the burr under their own saddles. In the '70s, adman Elliott Curson crafted the following words for a sardonic billboard overlooking the Schuylkill Expressway near Conshohocken: "Philadelphia Isn't As Bad As Philadelphians Say It Is. " It was paid for by a group called Action Philadelphia (RIP). The billboard reflected a commonly held addytude among Philadelphians, who divide their time between bragging about Philly and trashing it. Scottish poet Robert Burns wrote of the gift "to see ourselves as others see us," to get a truer view of who and what we are. Philadelphians see ourselves through a filter of our experience.
NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphians were clearly tired of the Civil War in the days leading up to the invasion. They read regular newspaper accounts of Union setbacks and horrific battlefield losses while wounded soldiers filled their hospitals and fresh military units clogged the streets. To escape, some attended the stage adaptation of Uncle Tom's Cabin at the Continental Theatre; others took in the play Peep O'Day at the New Chestnut Street Theatre or caught a concert by Birgfeld's popular German military band in Fairmount Park.
NEWS
July 29, 1999 | Daily News
With 75,000 gallons of water, you could: Give 12-ounce glasses of water to 100,000 thirsty Philadelphians. Brush your teeth 75,000 times. Run the clothes washer 2,143 times. Flush an old toilet 21,428 times. Shower 1,071 sweaty Philadelphians for 10 minutes each. Take 3,000 bubble baths. Run a dishwasher 7,500 times. Hose off the pavement continuously for eight straight days.
SPORTS
September 6, 2012 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
OK, so Phillies fans have had to endure a long, tough summer, one in which their expectations turned out to be as inflated as the bullpen ERA. The sellout streak ended. So too, almost certainly, will the postseason streak. Two of the team's aces - Cliff Lee and Roy Halladay - never got going. And on a few now notorious occasions, neither did Jimmy Rollins, who gave new meaning to baseball's "dog" days. There was little relief from the misery. Nothing but misery from the relief corps.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|