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Philadelphians

NEWS
September 2, 1990
Even though Mayor Goode told us on television the other week that the city's financial problems "must be addressed by all of us," what realistically can the average Philadelphian do about the city's $200 million- plus budget deficit, let alone the immediate predicament of trying to borrow twice that amount to keep city government afloat? Believe it or not, that's a question more than a few Philadelphians are asking each other. It may not have happened over your dinner table, but it's certainly being asked by some of those who've been on the front lines in this city, yet don't hold public office.
NEWS
February 22, 1997
Philadelphia's paid image-makers have just popped out a slogan worth remembering, which begs Philadelphians to get over their long-running date with self-hate. Think about it: "Philadelphia: The Place that Loves You Back. " "Love" has, of course, been put to work in hot tourist slogans ever since "I love New York" and "Virginia is for lovers. " Some may fear that this love angle has been sucked dry. After all, how many times can you crank up the love machine to sell a state or a city?
NEWS
January 20, 2005 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is good to know one's enemy. To that end, we have compiled a list of the consumer habits and characteristics of the people of Atlanta, where the Falcons nest. And because we're a benevolent bunch, we compared Atlantans with ourselves. The data, by the way, were provided by Simmons, a Florida-based market research company, which culled the figures from its National Consumer Survey database of more than 27,000 respondents. So, Southern friends, we hope y'all accept this in the spirit of fun. We're not really malicious.
NEWS
June 24, 1992 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
If there's one thing real Philadelphians love as much as pretzels and Mummers, it's an honest-to-goodness, shoutin'-and-stompin' praise-the-Lord, golden-throated evangelist. Billy Graham's Philadelphia crusade this week is only the latest in a nearly 300-year tradition of big time evangelism drawing big time crowds here. Here are a few of the preachers who profoundly stirred the souls of Philadelphians during the last three centuries: GEORGE WHITEFIELD This Britisher might have been the most spellbinding religious speaker who ever set foot in the Quaker City.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | By WILLIAM C. SMITH
Philadelphians have a lot to complain about, and I do my share. For crime, take your pick of smash 'n' grabs, grand theft (auto and elections) and Schuylkill Expressway shoot-outs. We pay extortionate taxes for municipal services that range from abysmal to nonexistent. There's the odd piece of litter on some streets, and the bus drivers are a bit surly at times. I moved here from New York City, though, so I hardly notice these things. What bothers me more is how Philadelphians are so busy accentuating the negative that they never acknowledge the positive parts of this town.
NEWS
May 6, 1992 | By DAN ROTTENBERG
Can you find the common thread among these recent stories? When Fidelity Bank tried to close its Kensington branch office last year, neighbors mobilized to prevent the shutdown. They boycotted Fidelity, staged protest demonstrations and filed a federal lawsuit charging Fidelity with illegal discrimination against Fidelity's elderly and Hispanic customers. The neighbors relented only after Fidelity agreed to donate the vacated building to the community, to spend $20,000 remodeling its interior, to invest $1.5 million in the neighborhood, to dispense $130,000 to eight neighborhood groups, and to provide free advice for a small savings and loan company planning to open a branch in the building.
NEWS
January 1, 1992 | By DAN ROTTENBERG
During World War II, when Frank Binswanger Sr. was 40 - "over-age and overweight," as he put it - he enlisted in the Army "to inspire Jews" and emerged with the rank of colonel. His nationwide real estate firm assembled the Penn Center office complex in the '5Os and helped develop the Independence Mall area in the '70s. For more than 40 years, as Philadelphia's official goodwill ambassador, he roamed the globe touting his native city. He was a cantankerous, egotistical ball of energy who believed there was nothing he couldn't accomplish if he set his mind to it. By the time he died he had flown over both the North and South Poles and toured China with his grandchildren, had induced the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society to take charge of the now world-famous Philadelphia Flower Show, had driven the expansion of the Civic Center and the restoration of the Fairmount Park houses and the Japanese House and Garden, and had helped create the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp.
FOOD
October 28, 1992 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Those cartons of chickens and ducks on ice - Lester Halteman shows them off proudly. He slaughtered them himself this morning at his Souderton farm, just as his father did before him. At her century-old family grocery, Noelle Margerum sells wild rice, red lentils, jalapeno jelly and "Pregnancy Tea" to Philadelphians and out-of- towners. She's been prowling its aisles ever since she could walk, she says. Robert L. Moyer never thought he'd go into the pork and poultry products business.
NEWS
August 25, 2010 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Mike Monteiro grew up in Olney and attended Holy Child on North Broad, Central, Temple's Tyler School of Art. Then, as many creative types are wont to do, he fled West. In California, the Web designer noticed people are, well, different. They adopt a decidedly more placid approach to life in the Golden State. At the DMV, which can bring out the ornery in people and Philadelphians in particular, the San Francisco clerk inquired: "Why are you so angry?" To which Monteiro answered, "I'm not angry, I'm from Philly.
NEWS
November 22, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has made some strides in helping its poor over the last two years, but has a long way to go as the most deeply impoverished of the nation's 10 largest cities, according to a City Hall report released Friday. An office established two years ago to reduce poverty in the city reported that in the last year alone, a new network of benefits centers has helped connect several thousand impoverished Philadelphians with about $13 million in local, state, and federal benefits. Other measures also have yielded results since Mayor Nutter created the Mayor's Office of Community Empowerment and Opportunity in 2013 and placed Eva Gladstein at the helm as executive director, the group reported.
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