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NEWS
October 7, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Each morning, after sending her two boys off to school - good, safe schools in far-off neighborhoods where they can arm themselves with an education - Angela Sutton asks herself a question: What will she put on the table for them when they come home? If she is lucky and can style a neighbor's hair, maybe she will earn enough to buy some Oodles of Noodles, eggs, lunch meat, and bread. Things to get them through. If it is near the end of the month, if the cupboard is empty, perhaps she will only have enough for fast-food dollar-menu meals.
NEWS
October 1, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has the highest rate of deep poverty among America's 10 biggest cities, an examination of federal data by The Inquirer shows. The city is already the poorest in that group. Deep poverty is measured as income of 50 percent or less of the poverty rate. A family of four living in deep poverty takes in $12,000 or less annually, half the poverty rate of $24,000 for a family that size. Philadelphia's deep-poverty rate is 12.3 percent, or around 186,000 people - 60,000 of whom are children, an examination of the newly released U.S. Census 2014 American Community Survey shows.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
VATICAN CITY - Pope Francis greeted Mayor Nutter on the steps of St. Peter's Basilica on Wednesday with three fingers raised. "Three months," he said. In three months, the pope visits Philadelphia and greets what organizers say could be 1.5 million people in the biggest event the city has ever hosted. The World Meeting of Families from Sept. 22 to 25 and the papal visit that weekend are projected to give a huge boost to the city's tourism industry and generate a half-billion dollars for city businesses.
SPORTS
May 10, 2015 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Proving that you are never too old, Amir Mansour captured the Pennsylvania State Heavyweight title with a unanimous decision over Joey Dawejko on Friday night at the 2300 Arena. Mansour (21-1), 42, won by 96-94, 98-92 and 97-93 in a fight that saw both fighters draw blood. The loss dropped Dawejko's record to 14-4. Both fighters fight out of Philadelphia. It marked the first time in Dawejko's career that he went 10 rounds. "He came to fight and the kid is a good fighter," said Mansour.
NEWS
March 20, 2015
THE LATEST Pew Philadelphia Poll offers some revealing numbers about what city residents think of the public schools. The short answer is: not much. According to Pew, 77 percent of city residents rate the district's performance as either poor or fair. Only 19 percent rate it as good or excellent. These are depressing numbers about a system with the important and vital job of educating our children. The good news is that Philadelphians seemed to have woken up when it comes to education.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
When Philadelphia's next mayor takes the oath of office inside the glittering Academy of Music, he or she should have a plan to help the city residents who cannot afford to attend a concert, don't have enough food to eat, and do not expect life to get better for them or their children. The next mayor will lead the poorest among the nation's 10 biggest cities. More than a quarter of its 1.5 million residents live in poverty. Thirty-nine percent of its children are poor. There are programs to help, but too many people don't know they qualify.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Symphony orchestras don't typically slot in visits to China in the middle of a busy season. But the Philadelphia Orchestra is in the midst of its Pearl River Delta Residency Week, which slipped into high gear - after more than the usual Chinese cliffhangers - with a performance Wednesday of the choral/orchestral work Ode to Humanity in Macau. "I tell you, the world is getting small," said cellist Udi Bar-David, having recently stepped off a nonstop 15-hour flight from JFK Airport.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin and Rachel Zamzow, For The Inquirer
Philadelphia City Councilman Dennis O'Brien announced plans Monday to close gaps in services for growing populations of people with autism - shortcomings that have long frustrated parents as well as service providers nationwide. At a hearing before a Council subcommittee, leaders in autism services spoke about a range of needs, including smoother transitions across the life span and improved access to care for underserved populations. O'Brien said his plans will address many of their concerns.
NEWS
January 31, 2015 | By Sarah Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphians are more skeptical of snow forecasts for Friday after Tuesday's blizzard-that-wasn't. AccuWeather was calling for one to three inches of snow and a wintry mix for Philadelphia, and even more to the northeast of the city and in New England starting late Thursday and continuing through Friday. But after the storm left Philadelphia mostly untouched this week despite meteorologists' expectations of a foot or more, many people don't quite believe it. "With all this technology, you think they'd predict it right," said Michael Smith, 25, whose Tuesday history class at Community College of Philadelphia was canceled - along with just about everything else in the region.
NEWS
January 21, 2015 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
FOR THE MOTHER of Brandon Tate Brown, a young man gunned down by police last month, yesterday's re-creation of Martin Luther King Jr.'s March on Washington was especially meaningful. Brown, 26, was shot dead Dec. 15 during a traffic stop in the city's Mayfair section after a scuffle with police. Tanya Brown was one of almost a dozen speakers who took to the microphone to address about 6,000 people on Independence Mall and call for change. "I am extremely grateful to be part of an imitation of Martin Luther King's walk," Brown said.
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