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NEWS
July 15, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
DONNY SMITH, president of the Mayfair Civic Association, wants to split the sprawling 15th Police District into two districts, with a guaranteed number of officers patrolling each neighborhood. Right now, Smith said, the quieter neighborhoods like his suffer quality-of-life crimes, such as theft when cops are busy responding to the 15th's high-crime areas. "We're a blue-collar neighborhood," Smith said. "People are at work all day. They don't want to come home to find their house was broken into because there aren't enough police patrolling the streets here.
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
THE CITY yesterday opened six BenePhilly Centers to assist low-income Philadelphians who are eligible for benefits but are not receiving them. Increasing benefits access is a major goal of Shared Prosperity, an anti-poverty plan that Mayor Nutter unveiled last year. He tasked Eva Gladstein, executive director of the Mayor's Office of Community Empowerment and Opportunity, with creating and implementing the plan. The centers, Gladstein said, will help people "get benefits that can help alleviate some of the worst effects of poverty.
NEWS
July 9, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IN 1900, William McKinley was president. American soldiers were battling rebels in the Philippines. Orville and Wilbur Wright were tinkering with a contraption that was supposed to fly through the air, and Henry Ford was tinkering with the Model T, to be introduced in eight years and revolutionize American travel. And Anna Lois Berrian was born. Rural Georgia, her birthplace, was farm country, cotton and tobacco, and a place where black people knew their place, or paid dearly for not knowing it. In fact, it was the lynching of a young black man that was the main impetus for Anna's move to Philadelphia at age 22. Anna, who became Anna Henderson after marrying railroad worker Rembert Louis Henderson in 1925, became a much-honored and highly revered resident of West Philadelphia.
SPORTS
June 2, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
It's hard to imagine blue-collar Philadelphia sports fans, as impatient, boisterous and passionate as they can be, paying to watch people walk in circles for days on end. But for a brief period in the 1880s and early 1890s, when spectating options were as sparse as clean-shaven faces, our athletic-loving ancestors apparently found these marathons of monotony compelling. Competitive walking - or pedestrianism, as it then was called - briefly was the equal of baseball, horse racing, and rowing, particularly in large eastern cities like New York, Boston, and Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
SHENZHEN, China - The earnest young Chinese woman asked the question with a directness uncharacteristic of her world: How do you learn to appreciate Western classical music? She had come to the right place on Wednesday: an open, practical dialogue about symphony orchestra conducting featuring Philadelphia Orchestra associate conductor Cristian Macelaru. His reply: "You don't need to understand anything more than that it's beautiful. Allow yourself to be moved by the same things that move you in Chinese music.
NEWS
May 28, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
MARY ROBERTS was packing a box - a care package of sardines, cookies, canned beans and Kool-Aid - to send to her brother in Vietnam when the knock came at the door. "My mother opened the door and just started screaming," Roberts, now 79, recalled yesterday during a Memorial Day tribute at Philadelphia's Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Her brother, Cpl. Lorrence T. Friday, was 25 when he was killed in Vietnam on April 7, 1968. "He had enlisted in the Army," Stellzene Roberts, 59, said of Friday, her uncle.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | BY SANDRA SHEA, Daily News Staff Writer sheas@phillynews.com, 215-854-5886
PHILADELPHIANS have strong opinions about the issues facing Philadelphia as well as poverty's causes and solutions. With support from Temple University's Center for Public Interest Journalism, we commissioned a citywide survey from the Insight and Survey Center, a survey-research unit associated with the School of Journalism of the University of Missouri-Columbia and the Reynolds Journalism Institute. Nearly 350 randomly selected people from across the city were phoned. The results of this survey demonstrate that an economically, racially and educationally diverse cross-section of Philadelphians see poverty as one of the most important issues that the city must address to move forward.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The week wasn't typical, but also not exceptional. In a span of seven days, Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducted the Curtis Symphony Orchestra in Shostakovich's weighty Symphony No. 7 , and conducted the Philadelphia Orchestra in both the Academy Ball and a subscription series with pianist Radu Lupu - while shuttling to New York for Dvorák's opera Rusalka , starring Renée Fleming, at the Metropolitan Opera. This Saturday, the HD simulcast of Rusalka - to be seen in six area movie theaters - will require Nézet-Séguin to commute from his native Montreal.
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
ROME - Ignazio Marino began putting together his vision for this motor-mad city while pedaling a red Schwinn on Spruce Street to his job as a transplant surgeon at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. If Philadelphia could install bike lanes on its narrow, colonial-era streets and create car-free days on Martin Luther King Drive, he thought, why couldn't this ancient capital do the same? In June, the former Society Hill resident got his chance to make Rome a more bike-friendly place when he was elected the city's mayor.
NEWS
November 17, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
When he led his own superb Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra last year at the Mann Center, Manfred Honeck drew razor-sharp unanimity from the ensemble. That he could do the same Thursday night in his debut with the Philadelphia Orchestra points to a conductor of unusual powers of persuasion. It helps that the interpretations were so gorgeously etched, so generously individualized. The program was skimmed from the top of the popularity charts, so you might not have expected to leave the hall buoyed by a sense of discovery.
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