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NEWS
September 9, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
NEW YORK - Hours before Nicole Miller's spring collection hit the Lincoln Center runways Friday evening, Debbie Cenci was shopping it at the designer's Garment District showroom. Nicole Miller sales specialists curated a group of dresses and trousers just for Cenci, including a floral sheath fashioned from spongy neoprene. Thick, white lines break up the saturated florals, creating a shattered-glass pattern. This is Miller's signature spring 2014 print, and at 3 p.m., Cenci had purchased the dress - and a few other 2014 pieces - before the fashion editors, bloggers, retailers, and thousands of Fashion Week attendees have seen it, before the clothes have even been made . Cenci slipped on the model-size sample.
NEWS
September 3, 2013 | By Theodore Schleifer, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 1:01 p.m. on March 13, 2008, David Thomsen gained either a passion or a problem. He isn't sure which. That day, Thomsen made a single Wikipedia edit on the page for the expression "Holy cow," then walked away from editing for two months. Fast-forward five years, and on March 13, Thomsen spent the day editing discussion pages on the soccer players, pairs skaters, and other celebrities of Estonia while occasionally turning his attention to the neglected Wikipedia pages for some antebellum Maryland congressional elections and a Korean pop song.
NEWS
August 23, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
THEY ARE old now, those still living who were among the hundreds of thousands on the National Mall that August afternoon in 1963 when the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. energized a movement. But they do not forget. Here are memories from three Philadelphians who attended the March on Washington. Henry Nicholas The president of the National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees was a 27-year-old attendant at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City in 1963. He led the charge to bring 5,000 members of his hospital workers union, AFSCME's District 1199C, by train to Washington, the largest turnout of any single group.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Michael A. Nutter and Eva Gladstein
When we talk about poverty in Philadelphia, let's keep one basic concept in mind: We are all in this together. The effects of poverty ripple out beyond those directly affected to everyone who lives and works in this city. Poverty means fewer people have money to spend on goods and services in local businesses, and therefore fewer dollars flow through the economy. It means an increased burden on city services, and therefore a higher burden on city homeowners and taxpayers. But this isn't all about dollars and cents.
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
TWO PHILADELPHIA residents will receive the 2012 National Medal of Arts from President Obama tomorrow. Joan Myers Brown and Laurie Olin are among the 12 honorees who will receive the award during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House. First lady Michelle Obama is also expected to attend. Brown, founder of Philadelphia Dance Company (Philadanco), is being recognized for her contributions as a dancer, choreographer and artistic director. She is a past recipient of the distinguished Philadelphia Award.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Sarah Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia man was one of two cyclists struck and killed by a truck during a charity bicycle race Tuesday in the United Kingdom, authorities said. Toby Wallace, 36, was racing with friend and colleague Andrew McMenigall, 47, of Edinburgh, Scotland, when a truck ran into them in Cornwall. They were pronounced dead at the scene. The 31-year-old driver of the truck was arrested on suspicion of causing the deaths by dangerous driving and was released on bail, according to the BBC. Wallace, a senior relationship manager for Aberdeen Asset Management, an international investment-management group, was vacationing in the United Kingdom.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
For years at a time, classical Philadelphians go missing from the recording industry - and then they return amid a critical mass that couldn't have been predicted. Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia will eventually have 100 or so concerts available for download and streaming. Though the Philadelphia Orchestra's recorded debut with music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin won't be out until fall, he has major discs with his other two orchestras (Montreal Metropolitain and Rotterdam Philharmonic)
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Born out of crisis and largely overshadowed by its revenue-raising potential for the schools, the proposed $2-per-pack cigarette tax would be among the biggest boons to the health of Philadelphians in decades. Years of research show that a price increase of this magnitude would translate to about a 13 percent reduction in adult smoking rates, probably more for youths. Those who continue to smoke would do so less. Hospitalizations would decline, as would health costs, much of which is paid by the public because so many city residents are uninsured or have government coverage.
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 6:15 a.m., with the streets blinking awake, Eden Silverstein and Jacki Silva groggily made their way up to the 2000 block of Walnut Street. Slipping through an obscure door, they climbed stairs to a room where they spent the next hour wringing out their bodies to clear their heads. Across the city, throughout the day and well past dark, many others would make similar pilgrimages. The Philadelphia yogis are everywhere lately and steadily gaining in numbers. They are young, mostly, thin, mostly, and calm, relatively - their rolled mats sheathed in hemp, canvas, or Lululemon Namaste Mesh, slung over shoulders, as they wend their way through the city's pandemonium.
SPORTS
June 2, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was June 1971, and the crowd gathered at Merion Golf Club for the U.S. Open included a confused old man who kept trying to gain access to the players' locker room. As guards hustled the intruder away from the clubhouse, Arnold Palmer passed by. The world's most famous golfer suddenly turned and did a double-take. "Johnny?" he asked of the old man. "Johnny McDermott?" It was indeed Johnny McDermott, the man who had helped popularize golf in America, the first American to win a U.S. Open (1911)
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