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Philanthropist

NEWS
July 4, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul A. Tanker, 86, of Philadelphia, a philanthropist and actuarial company founder, died Monday, July 1, at Einstein Medical Center of complications from a stroke. He became ill Saturday while playing tennis at the Germantown Cricket Club. He lived in Cherry Hill and Wyndmoor before moving to the city several years ago. In 1960, with a $2,000 loan from friends, he created Paul A. Tanker & Associates, a pension and actuarial consulting firm in Center City. The company grew from two employees to 55 before he sold it in 1989 to Noble Lowndes, an international benefits company.
NEWS
September 20, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - Dolores Hope, 102, who throughout her 69-year marriage to comedian Bob Hope oversaw their charitable giving and played a key role in establishing the Eisenhower Medical Center in Rancho Mirage, Calif., has died. Mrs. Hope died Monday of natural causes at her home in the Toluca Lake neighborhood of Los Angeles, publicist Harlan Boll said. In the late 1960s, the Hopes donated 80 acres near their future Palm Springs estate for the medical center, which opened in 1971.
NEWS
January 9, 1997 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Arthur Poley, 68, who overcame an orphaned youth to become a nationally known business owner, educational leader and philanthropist, died Monday of lymphoma at his Horsham home. His firm, Horsham-based Poley Landscape, numbered among its clients the National Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Smithsonian Institution, both in Washington, D.C.; the Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia, and the Tavern on the Green restaurant in New York's Central Park. Its work appears in Fairmount Park, along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, and near Penn's Landing in Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 8, 1986 | By Sara Solovitch, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philanthropist Eugene M. Lang doesn't have time to evangelize. Lang's adopted class of 51 Harlem students is graduating from high school in one year, and when the students go to college, it will be with his money. He is brokering the adoptions of six more classes - having found six individuals to make the same promises to some of the worst schools in New York City as he made to P.S. 121 in 1981. And Swarthmore College - where he is chairman of the board of managers - takes a tremendous amount of energy.
NEWS
November 21, 1999 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Josephine C. Connelly, 87, a philanthropist whose foundation has supported Philadelphia-area people, projects and organizations for more than 40 years, died Wednesday at her home in Bryn Mawr. Through the West Conshohocken-based Connelly Foundation, which she cofounded in 1955 with her late husband, John, Mrs. Connelly oversaw the distribution of more than $220 million in the Philadelphia area, more than half of which went to Catholic organizations. Her husband was a former chief executive officer of Crown Cork & Seal of Philadelphia and founder of Connelly Containers of Bala Cynwyd.
NEWS
October 4, 1989 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Natalie Shoemaker Tyson, who died Sept. 26 at Foulkeways Medical Center in Gwynedd, had taste and an unassuming generosity for the causes she espoused. "She and her sisters had a wonderful grasp of what I would call simple elegance. They had a real sense of proportion but no arrogance and a gentility that was really inspiring," Bruce B. Stewart, headmaster of Abington Friends School, recalled yesterday. His school was one of Miss Tyson's causes, but she was also known as an artist with a flair for watercolors and as an antique and gift-shop owner with an accomplished eye. Her family lived in the Philadelphia area for nine generations, coming from Germany on a land grant from William Penn.
NEWS
August 1, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
RUTH CAPLAN Perelman was content to sit back and let her hard-driving husband, Raymond G., tear up the business world - sort of. There were times when Ruth was "quick to correct him when she disagrees," a writer said in an Inquirer profile of the Perelmans in 2007. "Ruth is quieter but keenly aware and committed, sort of a wise counselor," Gail M. Harrity, president of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, said at the time. "Together they make a fabulous duo. " Ruth Perelman died yesterday of pneumonia at age 90. She and her husband lived in Rittenhouse Square.
NEWS
January 27, 1996 | By Suzanne Gordon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Contributing to this article where Inquirer staff writers Connie Langland, John Corr and David O'Reilly and correspondent Laura Genao
John Eleuthere du Pont's name in block letters has been on the futuristic Villanova University sports pavilion on the Main Line for almost a decade. Last night it was on a warrant charging him with killing an Olympic athlete. The philanthropist whose desire for athletic excellence drove him to build the $15 million pavilion at Villanova in 1986, as well as establish state-of-the-art training facilities on his own property, is known around horse country in Newtown Township as an eccentric character.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adolph G. Rosengarten Jr., 84, a former Army spy, Philadelphia corporate director and Main Line philanthropist, died yesterday at his estate in Wayne. Mr. Rosengarten, whose family's century-old pharmaceutical business merged in 1927 with Merck & Co., graduated from Princeton University in 1927 and the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 1930. He joined the law firm Stradley, Ronon, Stevens & Young and became a partner in 1935. With the outbreak of World War II, he joined the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry in 1941.
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