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Philanthropist

NEWS
May 31, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul A. Richardson, 67, a Center City radiologist and philanthropist who loved music, photography, and racing sports cars, died Monday, May 27, of cardiac arrest at his second home in Wrightstown, Bucks County. Born in Manchester, England, Dr. Richardson went to medical school in England and then came to the United States, where he completed specialty studies at Cornell and New York Universities. In 1977, he was at New York Presbyterian Hospital when he met Linda DiNubile, a Philadelphian working in New York as a bank officer.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A prominent local philanthropist warned Wednesday that the Philadelphia School District's looming financial crisis would be disastrous for city schools and students, and urged residents in the region to support increased funding. "I'm going to be giving a call to action to the citizens of this region - not just Philadelphia," Carole Haas Gravagno, chair of the Stoneleigh Foundation, said at a news conference at the district's headquarters. "I live in Wayne, and I care deeply about what happens in Philadelphia because Philadelphia is the hub of the region.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
Kathryn Wasserman Davis, 106, a globe-trotting philanthropist who provided the start-up funds that her husband, Shelby Cullom Davis, used to become one of America's most successful investors, has died. She died Tuesday at her home in Hobe Sound, Fla., her family said. No cause was given. Ms. Davis' father, Joseph Wasserman, was the longtime chairman of the Artloom Corp. of Philadelphia, a maker of Wilton rugs. His fortune survived the market crash of 1929 because he was "part of a canny minority who kept their money in government bonds," John Rothchild wrote in his 2003 book, The Davis Dynasty: Fifty Years of Successful Investing on Wall Street.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ROBERT K. Greenfield was a prominent Philadelphia lawyer for 50 years, but even after retiring and moving to Florida, he just couldn't quit making his mark on the world. He had a second career as a philanthropist, establishing two important prizes for investigative journalists and artists, as well as taking an active role in cultural and political activities well into his 90s. And he never let obstacles slow him down. "He was gifted with a keen intellect and a lifelong ability to focus and pursue goals which often would seem unachievable," said his son Bill.
NEWS
December 9, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 93, Swarthmore College's biggest donor, well-known philanthropist Eugene Lang, says he doesn't expect to die rich if he can help it. "Having the money in the bank, I think, is not even an approximation of what money means or what it can do for you," Lang said in a telephone interview Friday afternoon. "And I don't intend to die with just money in the bank. " On Saturday, Lang, a 1938 graduate of Swarthmore, donated $50 million to the liberal arts college, the largest gift in its nearly 150-year history, topping only the previous gift he made to Swarthmore of $30 million in 1997.
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack Melvin Friedland, 87, of Gladwyne and Jupiter, Fla., a businessman and philanthropist, died Wednesday, Nov. 28, of Parkinson's disease at Pennsylvania Hospital. Mr. Friedland was the owner and president of the former Food Fair supermarket chain, begun in the late 1920s by his father, Samuel N. Friedland, in Harrisburg. It grew from a modest meat market to encompass 500 stores at its peak. The chain opened stores along the Eastern Seaboard, including in Philadelphia in the 1960s.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
NOT MANY PEOPLE have a forest named for them. Selma Katz did. Just one of the many honors bestowed on this remarkable philanthropist and cultural leader was a 10,000-tree growth in Israel called the "Selma Katz Forest. " The Jewish National Fund raised the money for the trees in 1991, at the same time naming Selma as its woman of the year. Not a woman who sought honors, Selma almost turned down that designation, but she couldn't resist the forest. A few months before the tribute dinner in the Bellevue, she planted a tree herself in Israel.
NEWS
September 9, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Sandra Mann, a philanthropist and former member of the board of directors at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, working to improve the lives of cancer patients was a longtime passion. Mrs. Mann, 61, who lived in Rittenhouse Square, died Wednesday, Sept. 5, of a stroke resulting from kidney cancer, at Pennsylvania Hospital, her relatives said. Her husband, Fredric R. Mann II, a Philadelphia lawyer and businessman, said his wife served on the board of directors of Fox Chase for 15 years.
NEWS
August 23, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chara Cooper Haas was known for several high-profile philanthropic efforts.   But a small 1999 news report told of a neighborhood program that seemed to fly below the radar.   Philadelphia Reads, a summer program to help children retain reading skills acquired during the school year, was holding sessions at 22 locations in the city that summer.   And it was financed, the article said, in part by Chara and John C. Haas.   Though the Haases were best known for major philanthropies through the Haas family's William Penn Foundation, Mr. Haas' 2011 obituary said he credited his wife with devoting their personal estate to help vulnerable and underserved children and families through their Stoneleigh Foundation.
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