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Philanthropy

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NEWS
October 3, 1998 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Janet F. Haas, a specialist in rehabilitative medicine and brain trauma who is the daughter-in-law of philanthropist F. Otto Haas, has been named president of the William Penn Foundation, the region's second-largest philanthropy. Her cousin, David Haas, son of John C. Haas, will become chair of the foundation. In a prepared statement, David Haas said the appointment of his cousin to William Penn's top administrative post represented "a natural evolution. " "The William Penn Foundation is well positioned to build for the future," he said.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1999 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Foundations, corporate-giving programs and charities in the region distributed at least $384.5 million in grants during 1997. Almost 80 percent of the money came from private foundations. The largest share of the grant money went for human services, for projects such as youth centers, programs that aid families and children, and employment training. Those are among the findings of a regional survey of charitable giving released recently by the Delaware Valley Grantmakers, a nonprofit organization that promotes philanthropy.
NEWS
May 10, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
When Gerry and Marguerite Lenfest sit still long enough to accept the Philadelphia Award this week, it will be entirely appropriate to fill the air with honorifics and superlatives: The big cash behind the expansion of the Curtis Institute of Music. On track to become the most generous donors in the history of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. But the unseen hands of the Lenfests as civic catalysts have been every bit as deft as the ones signing checks. "He does not give just for the sake of giving.
NEWS
June 9, 2010 | By OLIVIA ARMATER
The following is an excerpt from an essay by La Salle University student Olivia Armater, who with 900 other freshmen this year were required to write on the topic of "Economic Justice. " Armater wrote her entry about "philanthropy" in response to an opinion piece about the contributions of Bill Gates. PHILANTHROPY, to me, comes from the heart and mind. It is thoughtful and informed. The real philanthropists, whether a college student like me giving $50 to something I care about or Bill Gates giving $31 billion to alleviate world hunger, considers the worthiness of the cause and the impact their gifts can make.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From a video camera in the helicopter, the refugee camp looks like a place of desperation - row upon row of tents in the snow, meager shelter against an unrelenting winter in Kosovo. One the ground, inside a cook tent, the camera pans past labeled cases of food, donated by Kraft Foods, a subsidiary of Philip Morris Cos. Inc. Refugees, including a winsome little boy, dig into bowls of steaming macaroni and cheese. The television advertisement, now playing during such primetime shows as ER as part of a $150 million goodwill campaign by the tobacco company, is evocative, and not just because of the emotional content in images of the little boy, a mother with a baby, and men, defeated and sad. Philip Morris began its philanthropy advertising in 1999, after several years of disastrous publicity for the tobacco industry.
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By RONNIE L. BLOOM & STEVE GUNDERSON
  THE 11TH-HOUR avoidance of a government shutdown is another glaring reminder that the federal government is both broke and broken. But as the nation's leading grant makers gather in Philadelphia this week for the Council on Foundations' annual conference, they will see visible evidence of philanthropy's ability to produce results, despite budget cuts at the federal, state, and local levels. Philanthropy represents the independent, innovative investment of resources to build our communities and does much to help create opportunities and a better quality of life, here and around the world.
NEWS
December 16, 1999 | BY R. ANDREW SWINNEY
Everywhere around us are signs it is the season of giving. Every day brings reminders that it is truly better to give than to receive. Each of us has causes that matter to us. Each of us supports humanitarian, cultural or educational concerns, showing us wealth is gained through giving. Each of us exemplifies the parable of the widow's mite: The amount is not as important as the spirit in which it is given. But charitable giving is stuck in a rut. Even though donations increased 9 percent last year, Americans are giving only 2 percent of household income to help those we deem less fortunate - the same rate as 30 years ago. Despite a booming economy, we live in a time still marked by harsh patterns of economic injustice.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By John Moritz, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maya Rigler, a 10-year-old diagnosed in January with cancer for the second time, says she wants to be a philanthropist when she grows up. The fifth grader from Radnor Township may already have reached that goal, raising more than $100,000 for pediatric cancer this year. Brett Mezrow, also a fifth grader living in Radnor, was frustrated that research on mitochondrial disease was underfunded because not enough people know about it. Brett's best friend, Niels Strautnieks, was diagnosed at age 5. So he encouraged Niels to speak out, and the two 11-year-olds have raised more than $1,500 in an awareness campaign they hope will soon go viral.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
An elementary-school library book that Jane Goodall wrote about chimpanzees inspired Amanda Ketterer to start raising money for the renowned author and anthropologist. So the Cherry Hill student set up a lemonade stand in the front yard of her home and took in $5.50 from her parents, the sole customers. That was in 2006. Amanda is now 15 and has raised nearly $15,000 to support the work of the Jane Goodall Institute, which seeks to preserve habitats, protect the environment, and educate young people through worldwide research, education, and advocacy.
NEWS
November 17, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Typhoon Haiyan, one of the largest storms ever recorded, hit the Philippines Nov. 7, killing thousands and displacing more than 600,000. The full toll is not yet known, communications and access routes are far from restored, and aid has been slow to reach stranded, isolated victims. Could this be an opportunity for what some call the "new philanthropy"? A moment in particular for the millennial generation (born after 1982) to take leadership? Digital has changed the face of philanthropy - for both aid groups (which craft the call)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ida Newman, 101, of Philadelphia, a mother whose loss of her only child kindled a philanthropic journey to benefit children, students, doctors, musicians, artists, and uninsured women, died Sunday, Nov. 22. Mrs. Newman was a month shy of her 102d birthday when she died at home of causes related to aging, her family said. She had been mentally sharp until late last week. "Philadelphia has lost a lifelong resident who through generous philanthropy changed the lives of many in her nearly 102 years, and will be remembered for even longer," the family said.
NEWS
November 23, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
You might assume that the Philadelphia Orchestra today is benefiting from a popular music director, an economic climate greatly improved since the Great Recession, and the good fortune of living cheek to cheek with a growing - and affluent - downtown population. Yet this trio of assets has not been enough to buoy some key measures of the orchestra's health. Board Chairman Richard B. Worley diagnosed the core concern at the Philadelphia Orchestra Association's recent annual meeting: Concert attendance between September and May fell again last season - to 153,000 paid listeners in 2014-15 from 160,000 the season before.
NEWS
August 31, 2015
The Fairmount Park Conservancy has been awarded a $3 million grant to involve local artists and arts organizations in its ongoing work to support the city's municipal park system, the organization announced Monday. The award - given by ArtPlace America, a public-private philanthropy - was one of six similar grants issued this week to regional organizations across the country, including gifts to groups in fields as varied as public housing, health care, and youth development. The goal for each award, ArtPlace Executive Director Jamie Bennett said in a statement, is to encourage what the philanthropy calls "creative placemaking" - that is, the inclusion of art and cultural projects in community development and renovation plans.
NEWS
August 27, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Haas family, a quiet, multigenerational philanthropic powerhouse based in Philadelphia, has been named one of the eight winners of the Carnegie Medal of Philanthropy, an honor bestowed biannually since 2001 by a consortium of more than 20 Carnegie-related institutions. Vartan Gregorian, president of the New York City-based Carnegie Corp., said the Haas family, spanning 75 years over four generations, embodies the essence of the award because "they've done so much for so long.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
What if a philanthropy were run like a venture capital-funded start-up? Welcome to the GreenLight Fund. With seed money of about $12 million, GreenLight gives money to local organizations here, in Boston, and the San Francisco Bay Area. Local grantees then raise additional rounds of money - $32 million for social-impact work so far. How does GreenLight Fund work here? Venture capitalist John Simon and Margaret Hall cofounded GreenLight as "a way to do philanthropy using the approach a VC firm would take," Philadelphia executive director Matthew Joyce said.
NEWS
June 17, 2015
A story Tuesday about Giving USA's annual report on philanthropy misstated 2013 after-tax profits in the U.S. corporate sector. The correct figure is $1.7 trillion.
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Charitable giving in America has recovered from the damage done by the Great Recession, with donations to schools, hospitals, social service agencies, cultural groups, and other nonprofits in 2014 reaching $358.38 billion, surpassing its pre-recession record. But by one measure, giving from corporations to charity has dropped to its lowest level since the 1970s. U.S. corporate philanthropy, which includes grants from corporate foundations as well as in-kind gifts, was estimated to be 0.7 percent of corporate pretax profits in 2014, according to Giving USA's 60th annual report, researched by Indiana University's Lilly Family School of Philanthropy and released Tuesday.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By John Moritz, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maya Rigler, a 10-year-old diagnosed in January with cancer for the second time, says she wants to be a philanthropist when she grows up. The fifth grader from Radnor Township may already have reached that goal, raising more than $100,000 for pediatric cancer this year. Brett Mezrow, also a fifth grader living in Radnor, was frustrated that research on mitochondrial disease was underfunded because not enough people know about it. Brett's best friend, Niels Strautnieks, was diagnosed at age 5. So he encouraged Niels to speak out, and the two 11-year-olds have raised more than $1,500 in an awareness campaign they hope will soon go viral.
NEWS
August 23, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six months. That's how much time Bob Rosen figured he had left. The Yardley accountant was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, typically a rapidly spreading form of the disease. The doctors advised surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Rosen, 71, began getting his affairs in order. He talked with his son Eric, who would have the responsibility of disbursing his father's $160,000 in charitable donations after Rosen passed away. His father's generous gesture would be executed under heartbreaking circumstances; Eric Rosen dreaded the day. He told his father he had a better thought: Why wait?
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