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Philip Holiday

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November 13, 2012 | DAILY NEWS STAFF REPORT
IVAN "MIGHTY" Robinson, the former No. 1-ranked featherweight in the world, was inducted into the New Jersey Boxing Hall of Fame. Robinson was joined by Philly boxing judge Lynne Carter and, posthumously, Robert Grasso, who also was a boxing judge. Robinson, 41, was 32-12-1 as a professional, which included 12 knockouts. He fought from 1992-2008. His most memorable moments might have been his two points victories over Arturo Gatti in 1998. His first victory was acclaimed as the Fight of the Year by the Boxing Writers of America and The Ring magazine.
SPORTS
October 23, 2003 | By Kevin Tatum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mike "No Joke" Stewart says he won't be playing around when he puts his United States Boxing Association junior-welterweight title on the line against Ivan "Mighty" Robinson on Nov. 11 at the Wachovia Spectrum. The holder of a USBA belt is guaranteed a spot in the top 10 of the International Boxing Federation, which is a major sanctioning body. The 25-year-old Stewart (34-1-2, 18 KOs) is ranked sixth by the IBF. Robinson (31-7-2, 12 KOs), a Philadelphia fighter who is unranked, can move into the IBF ratings with a victory over Stewart.
SPORTS
November 9, 2000 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While Lennox Lewis and David Tua were hurling the usual prefight insults during a news conference yesterday at the Mandalay Bay, Ivan Robinson sat unnoticed and unannounced in the audience. The Philadelphia lightweight fights former two-time world champion Jesse James Leija on the undercard of the Lewis-Tua heavyweight championship card Saturday night, and the Robinson camp suggests you be on time. Robinson plans to warm up the crowd of about 12,000 with another of his fight-of-the-year performances, because this 10-round fight is huge for him. Lewis and Tua are just fighting for a title.
SPORTS
November 13, 2000 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
As early as the third round, Eddie Woods knew. Ivan Robinson's longtime manager didn't need to see the next seven rounds to realize his fighter, one of the Philadelphia's best for most of the past 10 years, was finished as a legitimate contender for the world championship he never would win. "I was seated next to this big guy, one of the security people for the Mandalay Bay," Woods said. "I said, 'That's it. It's over.' He said, 'What do you mean it's over? It's only the third round.
SPORTS
January 11, 1999 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Negotiations are under way to bring to Philadelphia a world championship doubleheader that would feature two of the city's hottest fighters - David Reid and Ivan Robinson - in separate bouts, it was confirmed by Lou DiBella, senior vice president of HBO Sports. The proposed March 6 card presumably would be held at the Apollo of Temple. It would have Reid (11-0, seven knockouts) - the only American gold medalist in boxing at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics - challenging World Boxing Association junior middleweight champion Laurent Boudouani (37-2-1)
SPORTS
December 23, 1996 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Now that he has defended his International Boxing Federation lightweight championship by outworking Nicetown native Ivan Robinson, Philip Holiday plans to take some time off to rest and relax. A very short time. "Flip is a fitness fanatic," Holiday's trainer, Harold Volbrecht, said of the South African perpetual-motion machine. "Even between fights, the longest he's out of the gym is a week. There are a lot of guys who can match his power and his speed, but no one can match his stamina.
SPORTS
December 21, 1996 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Ivan Robinson is heading into the most important fight of his life with a new trainer and a family dispute hanging over his head. Robinson (23-0, 10 knockouts), the Nicetown native who is the International Boxing Federation's No. 1-rated lightweight contender, challenges IBF champion Philip Holiday (28-0, 16 KOs) tonight at the Mohegan Sun Casino. In Robinson's corner will be co-trainers Odell "Butch" Cathay, who has been with Robinson since the start of his professional career, and Tommy Brooks, a recent addition.
SPORTS
December 23, 1996 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ivan Robinson handled the first loss of his pro career with a lot of class and a smattering of tears here at the Mohegan Sun Resort in the wee hours yesterday. The scrapes, bumps and glove burns on his face didn't bother him. Nor did the swollen lips and the bloody mouth. All that will heal in a few days, and his tired, sinewy, 135-pound body will stop aching. But the pain in his heart might take a little longer. Robinson seemed fine minutes after dropping a 12-round unanimous decision to undefeated lightweight champion Philip Holiday in his first world-title bout.
SPORTS
July 22, 1996 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Whoever coined the phrase "accept no substitutes" obviously did not have professional boxing in mind. Last night's nationally televised card at Teamsters Hall was the sort of patchwork special that usually makes for mixed results. Two of the featured bouts involved a fill-in for a fill-in, and ESPN2 carried another match that was a late addition to the schedule. In the main event, rising heavyweight contender David Tua (24-0, 20 knockouts) needed less than one round to pummel Anthony Cooks into submission on the three-knockdown rule.
SPORTS
December 18, 1996 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The most important event in the life of 25-year-old Ivan Robinson of Philadelphia is only days away now - a world lightweight title bout against champion Philip Holiday on Saturday at the Mohegan Sun Casino in southeastern Connecticut. Never has Robinson been so highly conditioned, so focused, so full of confidence, so exhilarated. He has everything a fighter could ask for as he approaches such an important night. Except his father's presence. For the first time, James Robinson, who trained Ivan through his outstanding amateur career and through all 23 professional fights, won't be in his corner Saturday night.
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SPORTS
November 13, 2012 | DAILY NEWS STAFF REPORT
IVAN "MIGHTY" Robinson, the former No. 1-ranked featherweight in the world, was inducted into the New Jersey Boxing Hall of Fame. Robinson was joined by Philly boxing judge Lynne Carter and, posthumously, Robert Grasso, who also was a boxing judge. Robinson, 41, was 32-12-1 as a professional, which included 12 knockouts. He fought from 1992-2008. His most memorable moments might have been his two points victories over Arturo Gatti in 1998. His first victory was acclaimed as the Fight of the Year by the Boxing Writers of America and The Ring magazine.
SPORTS
October 23, 2003 | By Kevin Tatum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mike "No Joke" Stewart says he won't be playing around when he puts his United States Boxing Association junior-welterweight title on the line against Ivan "Mighty" Robinson on Nov. 11 at the Wachovia Spectrum. The holder of a USBA belt is guaranteed a spot in the top 10 of the International Boxing Federation, which is a major sanctioning body. The 25-year-old Stewart (34-1-2, 18 KOs) is ranked sixth by the IBF. Robinson (31-7-2, 12 KOs), a Philadelphia fighter who is unranked, can move into the IBF ratings with a victory over Stewart.
SPORTS
November 13, 2000 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
As early as the third round, Eddie Woods knew. Ivan Robinson's longtime manager didn't need to see the next seven rounds to realize his fighter, one of the Philadelphia's best for most of the past 10 years, was finished as a legitimate contender for the world championship he never would win. "I was seated next to this big guy, one of the security people for the Mandalay Bay," Woods said. "I said, 'That's it. It's over.' He said, 'What do you mean it's over? It's only the third round.
SPORTS
November 9, 2000 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While Lennox Lewis and David Tua were hurling the usual prefight insults during a news conference yesterday at the Mandalay Bay, Ivan Robinson sat unnoticed and unannounced in the audience. The Philadelphia lightweight fights former two-time world champion Jesse James Leija on the undercard of the Lewis-Tua heavyweight championship card Saturday night, and the Robinson camp suggests you be on time. Robinson plans to warm up the crowd of about 12,000 with another of his fight-of-the-year performances, because this 10-round fight is huge for him. Lewis and Tua are just fighting for a title.
SPORTS
January 11, 1999 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Negotiations are under way to bring to Philadelphia a world championship doubleheader that would feature two of the city's hottest fighters - David Reid and Ivan Robinson - in separate bouts, it was confirmed by Lou DiBella, senior vice president of HBO Sports. The proposed March 6 card presumably would be held at the Apollo of Temple. It would have Reid (11-0, seven knockouts) - the only American gold medalist in boxing at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics - challenging World Boxing Association junior middleweight champion Laurent Boudouani (37-2-1)
SPORTS
December 23, 1996 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Now that he has defended his International Boxing Federation lightweight championship by outworking Nicetown native Ivan Robinson, Philip Holiday plans to take some time off to rest and relax. A very short time. "Flip is a fitness fanatic," Holiday's trainer, Harold Volbrecht, said of the South African perpetual-motion machine. "Even between fights, the longest he's out of the gym is a week. There are a lot of guys who can match his power and his speed, but no one can match his stamina.
SPORTS
December 23, 1996 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ivan Robinson handled the first loss of his pro career with a lot of class and a smattering of tears here at the Mohegan Sun Resort in the wee hours yesterday. The scrapes, bumps and glove burns on his face didn't bother him. Nor did the swollen lips and the bloody mouth. All that will heal in a few days, and his tired, sinewy, 135-pound body will stop aching. But the pain in his heart might take a little longer. Robinson seemed fine minutes after dropping a 12-round unanimous decision to undefeated lightweight champion Philip Holiday in his first world-title bout.
SPORTS
December 21, 1996 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Ivan Robinson is heading into the most important fight of his life with a new trainer and a family dispute hanging over his head. Robinson (23-0, 10 knockouts), the Nicetown native who is the International Boxing Federation's No. 1-rated lightweight contender, challenges IBF champion Philip Holiday (28-0, 16 KOs) tonight at the Mohegan Sun Casino. In Robinson's corner will be co-trainers Odell "Butch" Cathay, who has been with Robinson since the start of his professional career, and Tommy Brooks, a recent addition.
SPORTS
December 18, 1996 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The most important event in the life of 25-year-old Ivan Robinson of Philadelphia is only days away now - a world lightweight title bout against champion Philip Holiday on Saturday at the Mohegan Sun Casino in southeastern Connecticut. Never has Robinson been so highly conditioned, so focused, so full of confidence, so exhilarated. He has everything a fighter could ask for as he approaches such an important night. Except his father's presence. For the first time, James Robinson, who trained Ivan through his outstanding amateur career and through all 23 professional fights, won't be in his corner Saturday night.
SPORTS
July 22, 1996 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Whoever coined the phrase "accept no substitutes" obviously did not have professional boxing in mind. Last night's nationally televised card at Teamsters Hall was the sort of patchwork special that usually makes for mixed results. Two of the featured bouts involved a fill-in for a fill-in, and ESPN2 carried another match that was a late addition to the schedule. In the main event, rising heavyweight contender David Tua (24-0, 20 knockouts) needed less than one round to pummel Anthony Cooks into submission on the three-knockdown rule.
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