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Phillips

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SPORTS
May 4, 1996 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
J.R. Phillips hopped a flight in San Francisco Thursday night that landed at Atlanta's Hartsfield International Airport at 9:30 yesterday morning. Some 10 hours later, he was in the starting lineup for the Phillies facing Braves ace Greg Maddux. "Anxious?" Phillips asked. "Yeah, I was. Give me a chance to play and I'll be there. " Not surprisingly, Phillips, acquired from the Giants Thursday for a player to be named later or cash, couldn't wait to get to his new team.
NEWS
August 3, 1988 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International and Reuters
While Julianne Phillips is quoted extensively on her split with Bruce Springsteen in the Aug. 22 issue of US magazine, her spokeswoman said the model was upset over the magazine's report. Molly Madden conceded that US interviewed Phillips in February and made a follow-up phone call, but said that seeing the story on the cover was "devastating" to Phillips. In the article, Phillips doesn't sound as though she's pining away; neither does she address the subject of the Boss' reputed new love interest, Patti Scialfa.
SPORTS
May 4, 1996 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
J.R. Phillips had a ready answer when he was asked about the pressure of replacing Will Clark in San Francisco. "From the beginning," Phillips said, "I told people, 'I'm not Will Clark, I'm J.R. Phillips.' If they wanted Will Clark, they should have kept him. I'm not going to be Matt Williams or Barry Bonds or Lenny Dykstra. Everybody's different. " Phillips, 26, joined the Phillies yesterday in Atlanta. A day after being acquired from the San Francisco Giants, Phillips made his first start for the Phillies.
SPORTS
February 28, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
When Tony Phillips became a free agent last winter, he assumed his phone would be ringing off the hook. Several teams had dire need of a solid leadoff hitter, and Phillips was coming off a career-best season with the California Angels. But instead of causing a feeding frenzy, few teams showed interest in the 36-year-old outfielder. The best offer he received sliced his annual salary by some $2.5 million. Phillips eventually, grudgingly, accepted a two-year, $3.6-million deal from the Chicago White Sox. Then yesterday, after having a change of heart in his first week of training camp, Phillips abruptly retired from the game for personal reasons.
SPORTS
January 24, 1990 | By Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
There is more to basketball than snatching quarters from the tops of backboards. For every Michael Jordan who hang-glides on the cover of Sports Illustrated, there are hundreds more great leapers who have to settle for hanging in playgrounds because they never learned how to play. Meet John Bartram's Chris Phillips, a 6-2, 210-pound senior small forward who last year scored 1,350 on the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test. Yesterday, Phillips, who can perform all varieties, unfurled nary a dunk as the visiting Braves (12-3 overall, 8-0 in the Public League Northern Division)
SPORTS
May 3, 1996 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
The revolving door the Phillies have been using at first base spun again. And this time, J.R. Phillips stepped out. It was announced before last night's game against the Marlins at Joe Robbie Stadium that the Phillies had acquired Phillips, a 26-year-old lefthanded hitter, for a player to be named later or cash considerations. He's expected to join the team in time for tonight's game against the Braves in Atlanta and will become the sixth different first baseman the Phils have used this year, joining Gregg Jefferies, Gene Schall, Kevin Jordan, Benito Santiago and Jon Zuber.
SPORTS
June 19, 1996 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Three weeks ago, a betting person could have gotten impressive odds against the chance that J.R. Phillips would be back with the Phillies for last night's game against the Cardinals. Then again, nobody expected Steve Jones to win the U.S. Open. Even by those standards, Phillips has had a strange odyssey. Acquired from the Giants May 2 for his defensive prowess at first base and his power potential, he was designated for assignment on May 28 after hitting .103 and striking out 15 times in 29 at-bats.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | By Joseph Grace, Daily News Staff Writer
When Democrat Walter M. Phillips takes his campaign for district attorney into a room filled with police officers tonight, he knows the critical issue may not be his views on drug crime, police manpower or ineffective judges. It may be his stand on hamburgers. What's the beef? Phillips is expected to promise the officers that, if elected, he will not prosecute them for accepting free hamburgers from city restaurants. In fact, Phillips already made that pledge in a letter published in a recent police union newsletter: "I will not, under any circumstances, prosecute a police officer for accepting free hamburgers, free coffee, or other similar gratuities.
SPORTS
May 29, 1996 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
On the night of May 3, after a red-eye flight from San Francisco to Atlanta, J.R. Phillips talked about how happy he was to have been traded to the Phillies. That emotion lasted less than a month. Before last night's game against the Dodgers, Phillips was called into manager Jim Fregosi's Veterans Stadium office and informed that he had been designated for assignment to make room on the roster for outfielder Ricky Otero, who was called up from Triple A Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre.
SPORTS
June 29, 1996 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The injury-ravaged Phillies hope to use the next three months as a testing ground for their future. Which is why you may soon see an infield that includes its best prospect, Scott Rolen, at third base. And why you can expect to see a lot of work from rightfielder J.R. Phillips. Phillips, after being banished to the minors earlier this month, has returned to the Phils and has shown some positive signs. Last night, he slammed two homers and a double as the Phillies ended a five-game losing streak by defeating the Montreal Expos, 7-3, before 21,703 fans at Veterans Stadium.
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NEWS
May 23, 2015 | By Matt Hoffman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tyler Phillips was in command for sixth-seeded Bishop Eustace in its 6-2 victory over visiting No. 11 St. John Vianney in the first round of the South Jersey Non-Public A baseball playoffs. Phillips threw five shutout innings, allowing only two hits and three walks and striking out 10. A three-run third inning helped give Bishop Eustace the lead, and two insurance runs in the sixth sealed the win. Nick Browne went 2 for 3 with a double, a run and an RBI. Justin Hagenman drove in two runs on two hits.
NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
A work of bizarro genius, The Incredibly Dangerous Astonishing Lucrative and Potentially True Adventures of Barry Seal , at FringeArts only through Saturday, is not to be missed. Thaddeus Phillips gives us a brilliant, hilarious theater installation/conspiracy theory/telenovela/true-life drama about the titular drug smuggler and CIA informant. If you look up Barry Seal, you'll discover that not only was he a real person, but also that there are conflicting theories about his death.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When experimental multimedia theater performer and playwright Thaddeus Phillips premieres The Incredibly Dangerous Astonishing Lucrative and Potentially TRUE Adventures of Barry Seal on Thursday at FringeArts, he'll be showing how far he's come from his start in Philadelphia. This colorful first segment of the tale of the most notorious drug smuggler in U.S. history (whose second, lengthier portion, Alias Ellis Mackenzie , will run during September's Fringe Festival) features a stage full of beat-up Cadillac parts and splashy '80s costuming.
NEWS
May 3, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Columnist
It can be an overwhelming situation, seeing all those radar guns measuring his velocity, and those handling the instruments also assessing intangibles such as character, heart, and the will to compete. Bishop Eustace senior righthander Tyler Phillips is used to the drill and focuses only on the next batter, not the group of older men behind home plate who are taking notes on one pitch after another. Phillips has had plenty of company during his pitching appearances this season, as several major-league scouts eye him. It could be intimidating and overwhelming, or it could be motivating.
NEWS
April 11, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he was a child, George H. Phillips worked in the kitchen of his family's restaurant in Sea Isle City, N.J. "He opened clams, got a penny apiece," his wife, Linda, said. When ownership of the business - Busch's Seafood Restaurant - passed to him from his mother, Anna Busch, he was back where he started. "He was the cook; he kept the back of the house going," his wife said. Though the restaurant employed as many as 120 workers at its peak, she said, "he sweated like everybody else in that kitchen.
NEWS
February 11, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BUDDY CIANFRANI had it in for Wally Phillips. Phillips, a highly regarded crusading prosecutor on the local, state and federal levels whose forte was going after public figures, had his eye on Cianfrani as a special prosecutor in 1974. Henry J. "Buddy" Cianfrani, then a state senator with lots of political pull, scoffed at Phillips' efforts to nail him. He famously boasted, "If he can't get me, what kind of an investigator is he?" Walter M. "Wally" Phillips Jr., who died Saturday at age 76, had been named a special prosecutor by Gov. Milton Shapp to investigate police corruption in Philadelphia and any political figures who got in the way. Phillips called Cianfrani the "Big Cannelloni.
NEWS
February 10, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Walter M. Phillips Jr., 76, a tireless prosecutor whose efforts to root out public corruption in the 1970s shook the foundations of Philadelphia's Democratic politics, died Saturday, Feb. 7, of complications from earlier open-heart surgery. His career as a city, state, and federal prosecutor pitted him against New York mobsters and politicians such as former Pennsylvania State Sen. Henry J. "Buddy" Cianfrani. His drive to pursue graft at all costs at times laid him low, such as when he turned his investigative zeal on officials close to the administration that appointed him - and later fired him - as a state special prosecutor charged with rooting out police and political corruption in the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2015 | Howard Gensler, The Daily News
Contract balks According to the Hollywood Reporter , "American Idol" winner Phillip Phillips has complained to the California Labor Commission to get out of the contract with 19 Entertainment, the company that signed him from the show. "I am very grateful for the opportunities provided to me through appearing on 'American Idol'," Phillips said. "The value that the fans and the show have given to my career is not lost on me. However, I have not felt that I have been free to conduct my career in a way that I am comfortable with.
NEWS
December 23, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ALEXIS MCKINNEY had strong empathy for people who she believed suffered from society's various inequities. She not only had empathy, she had the passion and drive to do something about it. Her focus was mainly on the problems of being African-American, but her embrace covered anyone she thought of as a victim. "She was very committed to the community," said her brother, Frederick B. Phillips, a prominent Washington-based psychologist and social worker. "She was very committed to those she felt had experienced negative impact from society.
NEWS
December 18, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IN THE MANY years that John Bucci Jr. has been serving up his famous pork sandwiches at John's Roast Pork in South Philadelphia, he's made up many an order "to go. " But not this far. Last week, a customer came in with an unusual order. His father was a devoted fan of John's roast pork sandwiches, and he wanted to take one with him. Where John C. "Butch" Gleason was going was a place where you wouldn't expect roast pork sandwiches to dwell - but who knows? Butch, a longtime salesman, teacher, basketball coach and broadcaster, died Dec. 8. He had told his family, "The day I die, promise me you'll put one of his sandwiches in my casket.
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