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Philosophy

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NEWS
October 11, 1990 | By Deborah S. Weiner, Special to The Inquirer
Centennial's school board is planning to draft a new "Philosophy of Education," and the prospect has some parents worried. About 50 parents attended Tuesday's board meeting to voice their concern that the board's new philosophy would eliminate special academic programs in an effort to educate all children equally. Centennial has been discussing rewriting its philosophy for several years, William Tennent High School Principal Kenneth D. Kastle has said. A final revision could be years away, board members said Tuesday.
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | By Karen McAllister, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The Upper Merion Area school board hopes that visitors will characterize its high school students as active learners with intellectual curiosity who are being rigorously challenged in their classes. These were some of the descriptions included in Upper Merion Area High School's recently written philosophy statement that the school board unanimously approved Monday night. The statement and a list of goals for the high school are needed for next year's evaluation by the Middle States Association, a regional group that accredits schools in the mid-Atlantic states.
NEWS
June 3, 2000 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wilhelm Halbfass, 60, professor of Indian philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania and a giant in his field, died of a brain hemorrhage May 25 at Bryn Mawr Hospital. He lived in Narberth. Professor Halbfass taught at Penn for the last 27 years after stints at universities in Canada, India, and his native Germany. He also authored seven books, which are considered major sources and references in Indian and Asian philosophies. He visited India nearly two dozen times, meeting scholars at universities and cultural institutes, his family said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1991 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Remember how revealing it was to hear Richard Nixon's real voice - the tone and . . . uhmmm . . . vocabulary he used when talking informally to his associates? There was a portrait! And it would not have been possible without the advent of audio tape. Listeners can get as vivid - though hardly as lurid - a picture of Alan W. Watts from a new tape, Man, Nature and the Nature of Man (90 minutes, $10.95) from Audio Renaissance. It is a collection of excerpts from the speeches of Watts, one of the foremost Western interpreters of Eastern thought.
NEWS
April 29, 1990 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
Magic - with a bit of philosophy - touches the lives of some children, crops and cows growing on the slopes and valleys in northern Chester County. The magic is different for every advocate of Rudolf Steiner's philosophy of a "spiritual science" that went beyond the boundaries of conventional science. Steiner's philosophy of anthroposophy, from the Greek words for man and wisdom, includes a system of agriculture known as biodynamics, a combination of the Greek words for life and energy.
SPORTS
September 7, 2012
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. - The NFL is a league that adapts with unforgiving ease, a fundamental truth that was hammered home in an opening-night slugfest that offered a loud glimpse at what it is going to take to win the NFC East this season. Last year, the Giants and the Cowboys combined to score 116 points in the eight quarters they faced each other. On Wednesday night, they spent the first two quarters of 2012 battering each other into the MetLife Stadium Turf, the front sevens of both defenses dictating the action.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
The Centennial school board has appointed a committee of administrators, teachers and parents to develop a philosophy of education for the district. At Tuesday night's meeting, outgoing board president Joan Jankowsky announced the formation of the committee that has been charged with "developing a philosophy of education which is consistent with the board's mission statement. " Jankowsky said the committee has been asked to submit its proposal to the board by June 30. The committee has10 members, including three administrators, two teachers, two parents and three board members.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2001 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
As he leans over his lunch at Bleu, the fashionable restaurant on Rittenhouse Square, 31-year-old English author Alain de Botton begs to differ. His successful new nonfiction book, The Consolations of Philosophy (Vintage, $13), is not what it seems. "It's a slight bugbear to be described as someone who's written a book popularizing philosophy," the tall, slim and still single man of letters says good-naturedly. "In my grander moments, I think I've tried to be more ambitious than that.
NEWS
August 7, 1988 | By Laura Quinn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matthew Lipman looks as if he would be most at home with a volume of Aristotle or Kant on his lap. Indeed, Lipman, a philosophy professor who has the demeanor of a longtime scholar, has studied some of the world's most abstruse texts at Columbia University, Stanford University and the Sorbonne. Judging from his book-lined office in Montclair, N.J., it appears that he spends his time immersed in metaphysics. It bears little evidence of his other major preoccupation: children. "Kids aren't supposed to have ideas," Lipman, 64, said recently, sitting in the small building at Montclair State College that houses his most widely recognized achievement: the Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children.
NEWS
July 11, 2005 | By Charles Krauthammer
Perhaps the most telling moment of Sandra Day O'Connor's quarter-century career on the Supreme Court came on her last day. In her opinion on the Kentucky Ten Commandments case, O'Connor wrote that, given religious strife raging around the world and America's success in resolving religious differences, why would we "renegotiate the boundaries between church and state. . . . Why would we trade a system that has served us so well for one that has served others so poorly?" This is O'Connorism in its purest essence.
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SPORTS
April 24, 2015 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Sports Columnist
IF CHIP KELLY has said it once, he's said it a thousand times. Big people beat up little people. Those six words pretty much sum up the Eagles head coach's philosophy as far as the type of player he favors. It was a factor in why 5-9, 175-pounds-soaking-wet DeSean Jackson was shown the door last year and 6-4, 230-pound Riley Cooper was rewarded with a new contract. It was a factor in why he was willing to part with LeSean McCoy last month and replace him with bigger downhill running backs like DeMarco Murray and Ryan Mathews.
SPORTS
March 20, 2015
I FEAR for the children. Specifically, the ones coming of age over the next few years, when lifelong sports memories and loyalties are often forged. Who will reach their teens over the next 11 years. I fear for the ones too young to have seen Brad Lidge drop to his knees, Allen Iverson break Michael Jordan's ankles, the Flyers rally from an 0-3 hole against the Bruins, the Eagles finally make it to the Super Bowl. And that's just for starters. If your kids are anywhere from 18 to say, 28, they have enjoyed one of the better eras in Philadelphia sports history, full of stars and story lines, each season bringing with it a healthy level of anticipation and suspense.
SPORTS
February 26, 2015 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
IT'S AMAZING what can happen in a couple of hours on a Thursday afternoon. In minutes, "The Plan" exposed itself and Brett Brown became just another Asset. Brown, the Sixers' charismatic head coach, last week let everyone know he has little voice in the team's biggest decisions. That is comforting, since Brown is a good coach and an honest man. It is comforting, too, since the 76ers and general manager Sam Hinkie really have no "Plan. " What they have is a Philosophy.
NEWS
January 15, 2015
ISSUE | EXTREMISTS Barbarians at gate Bravo to Trudy Rubin for urging that the world come together to confront extremist views ("The world must now confront Salafi teachings," Jan. 11). It is nearly 70 years since the end of World War II and the end of the totalitarian regimes in Germany and Japan. Millions died before the world was able to thwart these regimes' desire for world domination. The barbarians are once more at the gate, and civilization must find a way to stop them or suffer the consequences of more and more attacks.
SPORTS
November 4, 2014 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Staff Writer
SO, IF you're keeping score, the injury list goes something like this: One starting center, one starting left guard, one starting inside middle linebacker, one hole-punching running back, one all-purpose running back/returner, one safety, and, of course, now, one starting quarterback and the other starting inside linebacker, who is indisputably the defensive quarterback of your team. Throw in the four-game suspension of right tackle Lane Johnson and it's actually quicker to list the starters who have played every game for the Eagles this season than those who have not. And yet, here they are, 6-2, atop a division that has been hit much less by the injury bug and dealt with it much worse.
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
Loop , Tangle Movement Arts' 2014 FringeArts offering, takes to the air to explore themes of identity and sexuality amid an eye-pleasing display of aerial rigging and string sculptures by Julia Wilson. Eight members of the all-female troupe, which describes itself as a "circus arts company," performed with sufficient proficiency on silk ribbons, trapezes, and ropes above a floor coved to the walls in a great white space at Philadelphia Soundstages on Thursday night. Loop is supposed to be about a single woman (Lauren Rile Smith, company founder)
SPORTS
July 24, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
In the summer of 2009, when the Eagles courted the contempt of dog lovers everywhere and signed Michael Vick, they made clear that they had sought out and received Tony Dungy's counsel and approval. During and after Vick's 18-month prison term for dogfighting, Dungy had become a mentor to him. This was no small thing. As the former head coach of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Indianapolis Colts, as a man regarded as something of a moral compass within the NFL and its warped value system, Dungy wielded power and influence in fostering acceptance for Vick's return to pro football.
SPORTS
June 30, 2014 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
You should have disregarded NBA commissioner Adam Silver's announcing around 7:45 p.m. Thursday that the 76ers were on the clock. They had been on the clock for 364 days, through several hundred hours of scouting followed by several hundred mock drafts and several hundred rumors. After all that, they made what they called an easy choice. Time will tell if Joel Embiid was the right choice; we won't know until he actually starts playing. We'll probably have to wait at least until we see the 7-foot center out of Kansas defending a mobile post player in the 2015-16 season opener before we begin to draw any conclusions.
NEWS
June 20, 2014
C ARLOS R. VEGA, 32, of Center City, is founder and CEO of startup Tesorio, an online marketplace that helps buyers and suppliers with cash management. Vega, a citizen of both Panama and the United States, is a recent Wharton grad with a masters in business. Tesorio was accepted into the Wharton Venture Initiation Program, which provides office space and other help for startups. Q: How did you come up with the idea for Tesorio? A: Access to financing can be tedious for small businesses.
NEWS
May 13, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stanley H. Rosen, 84, of Philadelphia, a scholar and emeritus professor of philosophy, died Sunday, May 4, of pneumonia at Cathedral Village in Roxborough. Dr. Rosen was an influential writer and teacher known for his thinking and writing on Plato, Heidegger, Hegel, and Nietzsche. He served on the faculty of Pennsylvania State University for 38 years and Boston University for 14 years before retiring to Philadelphia to be near family. He was the author of 20 books, recipient of numerous honors, and a former president of the Metaphysical Society of America.
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