CollectionsPhilosophy
IN THE NEWS

Philosophy

NEWS
August 30, 2001 | By Steve Esack INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Joseph Galli's philosophy has not waned in 32 years as an educator. From his first job as an eighth-grade American history teacher at Drexel Hill Middle School in 1969, Galli has believed and preached that "my whole purpose for living is to enlarge the lives of others. " He learned that philosophy from his parents. He has passed it along to his two adult sons. He thinks he has passed it along to at least a few students in his time. And now he hopes to pass it along to a much larger audience - 12,500 students, 1,500 staff members, and about 80,000 taxpayers - as the new superintendent of the Upper Darby School District.
LIVING
August 17, 1999 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
The moment cynical journalists hear about Lou Marinoff's professional crusade - lobbying for philosophers to practice as therapists, just like psychologists and psychiatrists - the jokes and headlines form fast. I Shrink, Therefore I Am. Take Two Aphorisms and Call Me in the Morning. The Uncompensated Life Is Not Worth Living. How Many Philosophers Can You Fit on the Head of a Couch? Marinoff knows the drill, and has the clips to prove it, but the 47-year-old philosophy professor at City College of New York doesn't mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1999 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
The Ayn Rand who whirls onto center stage in a forthcoming Showtime film biography is a figure some may have trouble recognizing. This Rand is an occasionally unclad woman of a certain age, an intense Lady Svengali with a thick Russian accent and archly perched cigarette who sprinkles apercus ("Lesser people could never accept this") as she storms about the house in torrid love scenes with her 25-year-younger lover and intellectual heir, Nathaniel Branden. The Passion of Ayn Rand, based on a 1986 biography of the philosopher by former disciple Barbara Branden - who was married to Nathaniel - will be shown at 8 p.m. next Sunday.
NEWS
April 15, 1986 | By Matthew Purdy, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Robert Brennan was the top salesman for Mayflower Securities in 1969, his colleagues crowned him Caesar on a company trip to Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. The coronation was only a gag. But Brennan has since become a conqueror and a builder, reigning over expanding provinces of power and money. Every inch of his empire is unmistakably Brennan's. His portrait hangs in the lobby of every First Jersey Securities office, captioned with his quotations, such as "Free Enterprise is an Attitude" or "Come Grow With Us. " He records inspirational talks in his Manhattan office and sends videotaped copies around the country to be shown to his 1,200 salesmen.
SPORTS
June 24, 2013 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
We've got it all wrong about Chip Kelly, something the new Eagles coach seems likely to point out eventually. He's very bright, but we know that. He's not unsure of himself, but we know that, too. He doesn't suffer fools or foolish questions well, but it's hard to blame him there. Where we are wrong about Kelly, at least according to his first biographer, is that he isn't a mad scientist working furiously on a secret blackboard in the back room, designing big brain schemes that leave opponents trying to block the wind and tackle smoke.
NEWS
May 13, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stanley H. Rosen, 84, of Philadelphia, a scholar and emeritus professor of philosophy, died Sunday, May 4, of pneumonia at Cathedral Village in Roxborough. Dr. Rosen was an influential writer and teacher known for his thinking and writing on Plato, Heidegger, Hegel, and Nietzsche. He served on the faculty of Pennsylvania State University for 38 years and Boston University for 14 years before retiring to Philadelphia to be near family. He was the author of 20 books, recipient of numerous honors, and a former president of the Metaphysical Society of America.
NEWS
October 19, 1999 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Bibhuti S. Yadav, 56, of Narberth, a professor of classical Hindu and Indian Buddhist philosophy at Temple University, died Oct. 10 at Lankenau Hospital from a head injury he apparently sustained in a fall in his apartment. The Montgomery County Coroner's Office said Dr. Yadav's landlord found him unconscious in his apartment two days before his death, which was ruled accidental. Dr. Yadav was born in Tulasipur, India, and studied philosophy at Benares Hindu University, from which he received his doctoral degree in 1970.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2003 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
OK, maybe Aristotle didn't give a fig about the issue, but: What does Tastee Wheat really taste like? And what about those other puzzles in The Matrix and The Matrix Reloaded. You know, "What's really real?" And "What's control, anyway?" They're almost as challenging as the $195 million question (as in prorated investment for the first two films): Are the two movies just big-budget Hollywood product, reeking wannabe philosophical pretension to suck in the dollars of pseudo-intellectual teen fry with the rest of the masses?
SPORTS
September 23, 2011
Athlete             School          Class          Major Angela Acuna       St. Joseph's       Sr. International bus. Danielle Brady       St. Joseph's       Sr. Elementary/sp. ed. Caitlin Connors    Philadelphia U.    Sr. Textile design Liz Donald          Penn                Sr.     Communication Kara Jackson       Temple             Jr.           Kinesiology Alex Karls          St.
NEWS
October 24, 2007 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Qrescent Mali Mason, a third-year grad student in philosophy at Temple University, snared a $138 discount fare and made it down to the "Athens of the South," complete with its own full-scale Parthenon. Lina Buffington, who earned her Ph.D. in philosophy at Emory University and now works for the nonprofit Philadelphia Futures, gave a talk on how she applies her work on philosophers Wilhelm Dilthey, Jean-Paul Sartre and John Dewey to help young blacks stay in college. Jameliah Shorter, a sophomore philosophy and religion major at Paine College in Augusta, Ga., asked her mother to drive her eight hours through rough mountain roads to attend.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|