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Philosophy

SPORTS
May 21, 2011 | By DICK JERARDI, jerardd@phillynews.com
BALTIMORE - John Chaney remembers the phone call as if it were yesterday. It was a very young Congie DeVito calling to tell him about some basketball statistics he had worked up. "This kid was as smart as they come," the old Temple coach remembered. "He read somewhere that my philosophy was just don't commit any turnovers. " So they talked for hours about that philosophy, and through the years, the philosophy of life. "I first met him at one of our games," Chaney said. They became great friends.
NEWS
March 6, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. John M. Driscoll, 87, president of Villanova University from 1975 to 1988, who added dormitories and other buildings as part of a campus expansion, died Thursday, March 3, at the campus monastery. Villanova University, 1842- 1992, by David R. Contosta, found that through the school's 31 presidencies to that time, three of the men had been "outstanding," and Father Driscoll was one, according to a 1995 Inquirer review of the book. In a statement on the university website, the Rev. Peter Donohue, the current president, noted that Father Driscoll's tenure had included the completion of the Connelly Center - a gathering place for students that includes a dining space, a movie theater, and an art gallery - and the Pavilion, the basketball arena.
SPORTS
October 15, 2010 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
If he hadn't dedicated his life to baseball, Charlie Manuel would have made an excellent pro wrestler. Vince McMahon, the WWE patriarch, likes to refer to his employees as sports entertainers. That description fits Manuel perfectly. The man has both charisma and guts. One minute he's making you laugh with homespun witticisms, the next he's challenging ornery radio hosts to "stop by" his office to scrap. Give him a steel chair and a different type of uniform and he'd make Hulk Hogan tap out for sure.
SPORTS
September 10, 2010 | By JOSEPH SANTOLIQUITO, For the Daily News
The first thing you notice is his neck. It's oak-tree thick, a great shock absorber built for collision. Then you notice his eyes. They dart back and forth, often seeing and reacting to things few high school linebackers pick up. Ridley's Sam Dixon-Dougan doesn't miss them. He was arguably the best player on the field last year in the first half of Ridley's PIAA Class AAAA state semifinal against eventual state champion La Salle. There's a reason why a 35-7 Riley defeat was a competitive game at halftime: That reason was the 12 tackles the 5-11, 190-pound senior fireplug had by intermission, flying all over the field.
SPORTS
July 30, 2010 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Never mind. All that talk about restocking the farm system and balancing the need to win today with the need to put a team on the field in the future? Well, that was then. This is now, and now the Phillies have decided they want to do whatever it takes to make the 2010 postseason. If that had been the philosophy last December, yesterday's deal for Roy Oswalt would not have been necessary. If that had been the philosophy when it should have been, the Phils would not be in the precarious situation of staring up at the Atlanta Braves in the National League East.
NEWS
July 15, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
James Francis Ross, 78, of University City, a professor of philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania, died of complications from endocarditis Monday, July 12, at his summer home in Little Compton, R.I. Dr. Ross had been on the Penn faculty since 1962 and was a former chairman of the philosophy department. Though he published several books and more than 100 articles on medieval philosophy, metaphysics, the philosophy of religion, and the philosophy of law, he "lived for teaching" and had no plans to retire from the classroom, son Seamus said.
NEWS
June 3, 2010 | By E. J. Dionne
It should become the philosophical shot heard 'round the country. In a remarkable speech that received far too little attention, former Supreme Court Justice David Souter took direct aim at the conservatives' favorite theory of judging. Souter's verdict: It "has only a tenuous connection to reality. " At issue is "originalism," an approach to reading the Constitution whose seeming precision has given conservatives a polemical advantage over the liberals' "living Constitution" idea, which appears to let judges say our founding document means whatever they want it to mean.
NEWS
March 20, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Albert H. Jenemann, 82, former chairman of the philosophy department and vice president at St. Joseph's University, died of cancer on Tuesday at Manresa Hall, the college's infirmary. Born in Philadelphia, he graduated from West Catholic High School and studied for two years at the Merchant Marine Academy before entering the Society of Jesus in 1947, becoming a priest in 1960. While studying toward the priesthood, he taught religion and mathematics at Loyola High School in Towson, Md., from 1954 to 1957, before focusing on theological studies at Weston (Mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
That ker-CHUNK! you're hearing after the storm isn't confined to the clots of snow falling from trees and rooftops. You can sense the sound inside Plays & Players Theatre, too, where Bruce Graham's terrific new Any Given Monday, a funny and mesmerizingly dark adventure set in a family room somewhere in Philadelphia, is in its world premiere. At the theater, what's falling onto the stage and crashing to pieces is more fragile even than snow. It's a moral code. And maybe it's making a more shattering sound - like the crashing of those tablets Moses is said to have dropped.
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