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Philosophy

NEWS
June 3, 2010 | By E. J. Dionne
It should become the philosophical shot heard 'round the country. In a remarkable speech that received far too little attention, former Supreme Court Justice David Souter took direct aim at the conservatives' favorite theory of judging. Souter's verdict: It "has only a tenuous connection to reality. " At issue is "originalism," an approach to reading the Constitution whose seeming precision has given conservatives a polemical advantage over the liberals' "living Constitution" idea, which appears to let judges say our founding document means whatever they want it to mean.
NEWS
March 20, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Albert H. Jenemann, 82, former chairman of the philosophy department and vice president at St. Joseph's University, died of cancer on Tuesday at Manresa Hall, the college's infirmary. Born in Philadelphia, he graduated from West Catholic High School and studied for two years at the Merchant Marine Academy before entering the Society of Jesus in 1947, becoming a priest in 1960. While studying toward the priesthood, he taught religion and mathematics at Loyola High School in Towson, Md., from 1954 to 1957, before focusing on theological studies at Weston (Mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
That ker-CHUNK! you're hearing after the storm isn't confined to the clots of snow falling from trees and rooftops. You can sense the sound inside Plays & Players Theatre, too, where Bruce Graham's terrific new Any Given Monday, a funny and mesmerizingly dark adventure set in a family room somewhere in Philadelphia, is in its world premiere. At the theater, what's falling onto the stage and crashing to pieces is more fragile even than snow. It's a moral code. And maybe it's making a more shattering sound - like the crashing of those tablets Moses is said to have dropped.
SPORTS
December 17, 2009 | By Keith Pompey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stellar recruiting is a blueprint to building a national championship team. When it comes to football, Villanova and Montana have distinct recruiting philosophies. The Grizzlies prefer in-state players, and rarely do they recruit outside of the Northwest and California. The Wildcats, however, will go anywhere to get a recruit. Few can argue with both teams' tactics. That's because second-seeded Villanova (13-1) will face top-seeded Montana (14-0) in tomorrow's Football Championship Subdivision championship game at Finley Stadium.
NEWS
November 3, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania hired Russell L. Ackoff in 1964, it didn't get one man. It got an eight-person team. Director of the Operations Research Group at Case Institute of Technology in Cleveland at the time, he brought along seven of his colleagues to form the statistics and operations research department at Wharton. The hiring paid off. In 1971, in London, he received the silver medal of the British Operational Research Society. Dr. Ackoff, 90, former chairman of Wharton's department of statistics and operations research, died Thursday at Paoli Hospital.
NEWS
October 19, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the dawn of the 20th century, the nation's forests were in trouble. The country was headed for a timber famine. The great woodlands of the East had been cut, and those in the West were in the path of the loggers. Public land was being sold for pennies or given away outright. To Gifford Pinchot, a young forester from Pennsylvania, it was "a gigantic and lamentable massacre. " He thought the nation's resources should belong to - and benefit - all, not just a wealthy and powerful few. He decided to do something about it. In 1905, largely due to his efforts, the U.S. Forest Service was created, and he became its first chief.
SPORTS
June 2, 2009 | By Kevin Tatum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the end, 76ers general manager Ed Stefanski said, his choice of Eddie Jordan as the team's new coach boiled down to philosophy. Jordan, 54, was introduced yesterday in the Hall of Fame Room at the Wachovia Center, making official a three-year, $8.1 million deal. Jordan, who is back in the business after a 1-10 start this season that resulted in his firing by the Washington Wizards, is a leading proponent of the pass-and-cut game that is the Princeton offense. Stefanski and Jordan had worked together with the New Jersey Nets at the beginning of this decade.
NEWS
April 12, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the University of Notre Dame, Gus Cifelli played for three of the four teams that went undefeated from 1946 through 1949. He helped lead the Detroit Lions to the 1952 NFL title before playing for the 1954 Eagles. And he turned his philosophy major at Notre Dame into a career as a lawyer and judge in Michigan. But Philadelphians might best know him as a member of the La Salle College High School Alumni Hall of Fame. On March 26, August B. Cifelli, 84, of Bloomfield Hills, Mich.
NEWS
December 30, 2008 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
At precisely 10 p.m. Saturday at the American Philosophical Association's sprawling conference in the Philadelphia Marriott - the annual mass gathering of those who practice the world's oldest non-conclusive profession - a philosophical point was made. Evondra Acevedo, the academic group's employment coordinator, had announced that the "Candidates' Room," where graduate students and others apply for teaching jobs, was closed for the night. She'd been going since 3 p.m. A sign announced that the room would close at 10 p.m. She asked the 11 candidates still seeking service to come back in the morning.
NEWS
October 20, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. John M. Quinn, 85,a philosophy professor at Villanova University for more than 20 years, died of heart failure Oct. 3 at St. Thomas Monastery in Villanova. Father Quinn taught in several Catholic high schools, at Merrimack College in Massachusetts, and at Biscayne College in Florida. He taught at Villanova for three years in the 1960s and returned to the school in 1973. He taught Villanova undergraduates as well as Augustinian seminary students and was associate director of the Augustinian Historical Institute.
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