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NEWS
February 27, 2003 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
You could tell from the woo-hoo shouts that echoed through the Spectrum concourse Tuesday night that it's been a rough couple of years for Phish fans. For most of the time since fall 2000, when the hard-touring foursome went on hiatus, its tie-dyed acolytes were forced to subsist on inferior jam. Speculation ran rampant that the beloved band - one of the most successful acts working, despite virtually no airplay - might be finished forever. Phish returned in December with the quickly recorded studio album Round Room, and for the last several weeks has toured to support it, relieving some serious pent-up demand.
NEWS
March 20, 1992 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Flashes of deja vu came flooding my way, talking to lead guitar and vocalist Trey Anastasio of Phish, the daringly diverse and intelligent quartet of prog-rockers playing the Chestnut Cabaret tomorrow. While Phish make its home in pastoral Vermont, and got this cool thing together at the ultra-progressive Goddard College, Trey hails from Trenton, N.J.. And he spent his formative teen years (in the late '70s) listening to Philly rock radio. As he recounted early influences - Peter Gabriel-era Genesis, jazz guitarist Pat Metheny, oddball Euro bands like Focus and Pierre Moerlen's Gong, Frank Zappa, Steely Dan, and the progressive country maniacs the Dixie Dregs - I had this unshakeable vision of a precocious 14-year-old Trey, tuning in to my Sunday-night WMMR fusion show.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1997 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
Their singing leaves something to be desired, their lyrics are too loopy to mean much, and they look so scruffy their personal hygiene is in question. So what is it with the four guys of Phish, who packed the Spectrum with the tie-dyed throng abandoned by Jerry Garcia's passing? It's the jams, man. On Tuesday, the first of its two nights in town, more than half of the band's show (2 hours and 40 minutes long, not including a 50-minute intermission) was filled with jams. Spacey jams, art-rock jams, reggae jams, country-blues jams, funk jams and straight-ahead rock jams: You name it, and the guys from Vermont can blow your mind jamming on it. It wasn't always so. Just 4 1/2 years ago at the Tower Theater, Phish was annoying, performing self-absorbed songs and solos literally sung into a vacuum cleaner.
NEWS
September 15, 2000 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
It's not easy being Phish, to hear the guys tell it in their new, self-financed documentary. While the jam band's grass-roots fan base is huge and oblivious to the group's lack of radio or MTV play, the music critics of the world keep flogging Phish for being Grateful Dead wannabes without the chops to always back it up. Then Phish turns up the pressure on itself by staging marathon-length shows and even multi-day festivals. Not only do they insist on being the sole act on the bill, but they keep promising the fans new musical surprises every time they return to the stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2004 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Those unschooled in the ways of Phish must have been baffled by what happened midway through a song called "Ghost" on Thursday at the Tweeter Center. Following the verses - and after guitarist Trey Anastasio twice drew applause during his five-minute solo by surfing atop a kicky post-Santana Latin pulse - the lights dimmed and the music nearly collapsed. The Vermont quartet, playing its last show before a two-day farewell festival this weekend in its home state, had abandoned the beat in favor of a murky drone.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2004 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Even in the process of breaking up, Phish is doing things differently. The Vermont powerhouse - which plays its last traditional venue Thursday at the long-sold-out Tweeter Center, and bids farewell next weekend with the two-day Coventry festival in its home state - isn't exiting amid the usual rock-and-roll acrimony. There's no bad blood, no name-calling, not even those nagging "creative differences. " The jam band that built its reputation on thrilling group interplay, and became massively popular with little attention from radio or MTV, is presenting a typically cohesive front.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2000 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The scruffy Vermonters of Phish are an amiable bunch who obviously enjoy performing for their adoring fans, and appear to be in the business of making music for all the right reasons. They even have decent musical taste: In Bittersweet Motel, the wide-ranging jam band covers songs by Ween, Elvis Presley, Los Lobos and Edgar Winter, among others. But if Todd Phillips' banal documentary - which follows the group on tour in 1997 and 1998 and culminates in front of 65,000 people at the Great Went festival in Limestone, Maine - means to portray guitarist Trey Anastasio, drummer Jon Fishman, bass player Mike Gordon and keyboardist Page McConnell as compelling individuals, or make a case for the band's artistic importance, it falls short of its tie-dye target.
NEWS
November 26, 2009 | By David R. Stampone FOR THE INQUIRER
Conventional thinking on Phish holds that it's love or hate - either you are into the world's largest cult rock group or you shower the quarter-century-old jam band with disdain, predictably accompanied by snarky references to patchouli, a trust-funded fan base, mindless noodling, and the like. But the Vermont quartet invited other assessments on Tuesday, its first of two nights in the vast Wachovia Center before 20,000-plus fans. In a two-set, 20-song performance over three hours - Phish's debut at the center, and the first time in Philly since November 2003 at the Spectrum - the band offered things to excite, turn off, or just be lukewarm about.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1997 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
That almost messianic movement known as a Phish tour will make its way to Philadelphia in December. Tickets go on sale at 10 a.m. Saturday for Phish concerts at the Spectrum on Dec. 2-3. The Vermont band is often likened to the Grateful Dead because of its devoted fans, who often follow the musicians from city to city. Its most recent U.S. tour sold out concert halls in 19 cities; 60,000 fans attended the troupe's Great Went festival over the summer in Maine. Phish's eighth album, Slip, Stitch and Pass, contains 73 minutes of highlights from a magical concert in Hamburg, Germany, recorded on March 1 during a European tour.
NEWS
May 26, 2004 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Phish is going belly-up. The Vermont-bred jam band announced on its Web site yesterday that it's pulling the plug after nearly 21 years of making music. It will go out after Coventry, the two-day arts festival it will headline Aug. 14 and 15 in its home state. Guitarist Trey Anastasio wrote to fans, saying he got together Friday night with Mike Gordon, Page McConnell and Jonathan Fishman "to talk openly about the strong feelings I've been having that Phish has run its course and that we should end it now while it's still on a high note.
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NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
The sight of double-decker tour buses circling the streets of Center City is hardly uncommon. But this summer, the sound of some of those buses will be unusual indeed. With the Double Decker Music Series, tour guide/sound artist Sebastian Petsu and presenting organization Bowerbird will host five concerts on the open-air upper level of a moving double-decker bus, interspersed with a singular tour of Philadelphia history. The series, in its first full season after three previous events, will offer five intimate concerts, beginning this weekend with sets by former Man Man drummer and beat-maker Christopher Sean Powell and experimental folk duo the Sun Flights.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
For the first show in its sold-out two-night stand at the Mann on Tuesday, Phish and its devoted audience checked off the rituals that America's prog-rocking jam band par excellence and its fans have shared since 1983. Lengthy show: check. It clocked in at three hours-plus (starting late because of weather). Thousands of glow sticks raining down on the front rows: check. During the aggressive boogie of "Tweezer," the sky was a blur of neon. Trey Anastasio's dad and stepmother, Ernest and Geneva, in attendance: check.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2013 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
THE LITTLE MONSTERS are in mourning this week. But will they soon start sniffing around for fresh meat to chew? Another icon to idolize and adore? These "monsters" are the rabid fans of dance-pop queen Lady Gaga. And, at the moment, these lovers of all things Gaga are hearing nothing but bad news. Last week, she reluctantly shut down her touring "Born This Way Ball," a huge hit on the arena circuit. (Tuesday's canceled show at the Wells Fargo Center was sold out.) The 26-year-old has been crippled by a long-festering hip ailment, which requires surgery and months of rehab.
TRAVEL
February 26, 2012 | By Christopher Elliott, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES
Shauna Kattler thought she'd found the ideal rental home in Playa del Carmen, Mexico, for her Christmas vacation: a two-bedroom penthouse condominium with a hot tub and an impossibly perfect view of the Caribbean. And she was getting it for the impossibly low peak-season rate of $450 a night through HomeAway.com, a popular vacation rental website. Impossibly , it turned out, was the operative word. Shortly after Kattler, a relocation specialist from Kirkland, Wash., wired the money to Mexico, she discovered that her vacation dollars had gone not to the property owner, but to someone who had stolen the owner's e-mail password and assumed his identity through a crime called phishing.
NEWS
June 19, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Dave Matthews was planning to take the year off. "We haven't had a break this long in . . .," says the jam-band kingpin, stopping to think for a second while talking not from a tour bus, but from his home in Seattle. " . . . ever. Not in 20 years. " Indeed, since shortly after the South African-born singer and guitarist's eponymous band formed in Charlottesville, Va., in 1991, the Dave Matthews Band has been a concert industry juggernaut. In the aughts, the DMB was the biggest concert draw in the United States, according to Pollstar, grossing nearly $530 million and selling millions of tickets more than its closest competitors, Celine Dion, Kenny Chesney, Bruce Springsteen, and the Rolling Stones.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2011 | By Dan Gross
WRITER Sasha Issenberg has just sold a book, The Victory Lab , to Crown for publication in mid-2012, as Politico reported Friday. The former Philadelphia magazine writer's work is about modern American politics and the social psychology used by strategists and academics to change campaigns and win elections. It will focus heavily on Montgomery County native Todd Rogers , a Harvard-educated social behaviorist and director of the Analyst Institute, which was featured in an October New York Times Magazine story that Issenberg wrote on the topic of his book.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2010
Democracy (and a bit of anarchy) rules at Phish concerts - a very good thing. Every ticket inside and out at their amphitheater shows is priced the same ($50), putting all loyal fans on equal footing and leaving stragglers no choice but to sit on the lawn - your only option to buy in tonight. Democracy also affords this truly jamming troupe the right to explore whatever muses have struck their fancy, from Dada-like daffiness to honest ruminations on personal travails and "Joy"-ful recoveries, exercises in angular jazz and other challenging contemporary forms, rambling country rock and frisky, Latin-rhymed showpieces, plus surprise covers of favorite classic tunes and albums.
NEWS
March 22, 2010 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Look for a bunch of major local concerts to go on sale this week. Almost all are available through LiveNation.com, as well as either through Ticketmaster.com or ComcastTix.com. First up, at 10 this morning, were tickets for Sting , with the Royal Philharmonic Concert Orchestra , at Camden's Susquehanna Bank Center on Saturday, July 10. Available through Live Nation and Ticketmaster. Tickets went on sale Saturday for Sting's July 9 concert at the Borgata in Atlantic City, through ComcastTix.
NEWS
November 26, 2009 | By David R. Stampone FOR THE INQUIRER
Conventional thinking on Phish holds that it's love or hate - either you are into the world's largest cult rock group or you shower the quarter-century-old jam band with disdain, predictably accompanied by snarky references to patchouli, a trust-funded fan base, mindless noodling, and the like. But the Vermont quartet invited other assessments on Tuesday, its first of two nights in the vast Wachovia Center before 20,000-plus fans. In a two-set, 20-song performance over three hours - Phish's debut at the center, and the first time in Philly since November 2003 at the Spectrum - the band offered things to excite, turn off, or just be lukewarm about.
NEWS
June 9, 2009 | By David R. Stampone FOR THE INQUIRER
Under a full moon and before a full house at the Susquehanna Bank Center on Sunday night, Phish did what jam bands ultimately do: They jammed. And jammed. Front man Trey Anastasio repeatedly found a groove and fingered fluid guitar solo after solo, to the rapturous delight of the crowd, most dancing in that form of writhing free body expression associated with hippies, Woodstock and the Grateful Dead. In their first area appearance since their 2004 hiatus, the veteran Vermont four-piece squeezed out 23 songs over three-plus hours.
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