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Phosphorus

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NEWS
January 18, 1990 | By Nancy Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
Facing a state-mandated deadline that is 18 months away, the Downingtown Area Regional Authority Monday night approved a plan that relies on an outdated technology to remove phosphorus from the Downingtown sewage-treatment plant's waste water. The $128,000 project calls for the installation of a chemical treatment system that even the project's designers acknowledged was less than optimal. "The July 1991 deadline can be met . . . using a standard chemical-feed system, but this is rapidly becoming an archaic technology," said Craig Coker, manager of the municipal services department for Engineering-Science Inc., the firm that designed the plan and also operates the Downingtown facility.
NEWS
June 23, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A freight train derailed last night and two cars carrying phosphorus caught fire, spewing a giant plume of toxic fumes that forced about 2,500 residents of at least three small towns to leave their homes. No injuries were reported, officials said. The 32-car CSX train derailed at 7:55 p.m., 3 1/2 miles north of Crofton in western Kentucky, state police said. Two tank cars carrying phosphorus ignited, and a third phosphorus tanker derailed but was not burning, said Alvin Pollard, assistant director of the Christian County emergency center in Hopkinsville.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
YORK, Pa. - The latest substance from the York sewage treatment plant isn't stinky sludge or bubbly wastewater. It's little white pellets, about the size of small seeds. And they promise not only environmental benefit but real money. The pellets are fertilizer, and a formulation that incorporates them, produced by an Allentown company, is being tested at Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square. The pellets are also being touted as a way for the plant to meet stricter environmental limits for discharge into nearby Codorus Creek - and ultimately, the Chesapeake Bay, which suffers from an excess of nutrients.
NEWS
December 17, 2010 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid a flurry of criticism, a NASA-funded team on Thursday backed off the more extravagant, textbook-changing claims they'd made about a bacterium that had allegedly substituted arsenic for phosphorus in its DNA. The original announcement, made at a NASA news conference Dec. 2, seemed to break a cardinal rule of biology that all organisms need some phosphorus to survive. NASA researchers claimed to have discovered an exotic organism in California's Mono Lake that lived instead on arsenic, thus broadening the types of life that may exist in the universe.
NEWS
July 10, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A derailed tank car containing white phosphorus exploded last night, spreading a cloud of poisonous fumes that injured at least 78 people and forced thousands of residents to flee for the second time in two days. Allan Franks, a spokesman for the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, said all residents of Miamisburg, West Carrollton, Moraine and Miami Township - about 25,000 people - were ordered to leave their homes in the Dayton suburbs. "If we have to go door-to-door to evacuate people in the city, we will," one police officer said.
NEWS
December 6, 2010 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do arsenic-tolerant bacteria redefine life, as some recent headlines pronounced? And why are people saying the finding increases the odds of finding aliens? After a much-ballyhooed NASA news conference Thursday, a number of biologists were also scratching their heads. NASA fellow Felisa Wolfe-Simon and colleagues found some microbes living at the bottom of California's Mono Lake, which has a high level of arsenic. The scientists took the microbes out of the lake and infused them with more arsenic.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | Freelance
MEMBERS of The Crossing, a Philadelphia professional chamber choir whose sound the New York Times has described as "lush" and "mesmerizing," sing a lot more than your typical Bach cantatas and oratorios. That's evident this weekend with the all-vocal "Hesperus is Phosphorus," the second concert in the group's fourth annual Month of Moderns series. The series fulfills conductor Donald Nally's initiative to commission new music for the group. This year's theme has been pieces related to or inspired by poetry; "Hesperus" draws from modern vespers.
NEWS
December 25, 1989 | By GORDON S. LIVINGSTON
We were sitting down to Christmas Eve dinner at the Seventh Surgical Hospital, Blackhorse Base Camp, Republic of Vietnam. The year was 1968. It was a quiet night in the war, and the doctors and nurses were looking forward to an evening eating turkey, exchanging presents and longing to be elsewhere. The bad news came, as it always did, from the night radio operator who appeared at the side of the hospital commander, whispering in his ear. "Ladies and gentlemen," the colonel said, "we have casualties coming in. " This group had heard these words before and quietly moved to the triage area.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2000 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
FMC Corp., the industrial conglomerate from Chicago, said yesterday it will scale back some of its Philadelphia employment, pending government approval of a joint venture to be based in St. Louis. The company has 450 employees working for its chemical businesses at the Mellon Bank Center in Center City, but that is expected to decline after FMC and Solutia Inc., of St. Louis, combine their phosphorus and phosphate businesses. "It will involve a small percentage of our employees in Philadelphia," said Thomas Kline, a spokesman for FMC in Chicago, who said he could not specify the number of jobs that would be lost.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns and Inquirer Music Critic
Though vespers tend to be among the most open-ended platforms for religious music, the latest one to be unveiled in the Crossing choir's Month of Moderns festival Saturday was so wide-ranging that words like unorthodox, eccentric, and crazy seem pathetically inadequate.   The hour-long Vespers Cantata: Hesperus Is Phosphorus by Lewis Spratlan encompasses so many schools of thought that it even gives a sloppy kiss to agnostics. The composer uses certain chord structures one associates with mainstream English choral composers and bits of the standard Magnificat text.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | Freelance
MEMBERS of The Crossing, a Philadelphia professional chamber choir whose sound the New York Times has described as "lush" and "mesmerizing," sing a lot more than your typical Bach cantatas and oratorios. That's evident this weekend with the all-vocal "Hesperus is Phosphorus," the second concert in the group's fourth annual Month of Moderns series. The series fulfills conductor Donald Nally's initiative to commission new music for the group. This year's theme has been pieces related to or inspired by poetry; "Hesperus" draws from modern vespers.
NEWS
December 17, 2010 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid a flurry of criticism, a NASA-funded team on Thursday backed off the more extravagant, textbook-changing claims they'd made about a bacterium that had allegedly substituted arsenic for phosphorus in its DNA. The original announcement, made at a NASA news conference Dec. 2, seemed to break a cardinal rule of biology that all organisms need some phosphorus to survive. NASA researchers claimed to have discovered an exotic organism in California's Mono Lake that lived instead on arsenic, thus broadening the types of life that may exist in the universe.
NEWS
December 6, 2010 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do arsenic-tolerant bacteria redefine life, as some recent headlines pronounced? And why are people saying the finding increases the odds of finding aliens? After a much-ballyhooed NASA news conference Thursday, a number of biologists were also scratching their heads. NASA fellow Felisa Wolfe-Simon and colleagues found some microbes living at the bottom of California's Mono Lake, which has a high level of arsenic. The scientists took the microbes out of the lake and infused them with more arsenic.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
YORK, Pa. - The latest substance from the York sewage treatment plant isn't stinky sludge or bubbly wastewater. It's little white pellets, about the size of small seeds. And they promise not only environmental benefit but real money. The pellets are fertilizer, and a formulation that incorporates them, produced by an Allentown company, is being tested at Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square. The pellets are also being touted as a way for the plant to meet stricter environmental limits for discharge into nearby Codorus Creek - and ultimately, the Chesapeake Bay, which suffers from an excess of nutrients.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2000 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
FMC Corp., the industrial conglomerate from Chicago, said yesterday it will scale back some of its Philadelphia employment, pending government approval of a joint venture to be based in St. Louis. The company has 450 employees working for its chemical businesses at the Mellon Bank Center in Center City, but that is expected to decline after FMC and Solutia Inc., of St. Louis, combine their phosphorus and phosphate businesses. "It will involve a small percentage of our employees in Philadelphia," said Thomas Kline, a spokesman for FMC in Chicago, who said he could not specify the number of jobs that would be lost.
NEWS
March 21, 1994 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Some were old people, others severely ill or schizophrenic. Many were patients at university medical centers or Philadelphia General Hospital, the hospital that once was a last resort for the city's poor. Many were injected in the calf or uterus with radioactive phosphorus or sodium. And babies of staff members at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children were fed cereal laced with radioactive iron. In all, dozens of Philadelphia patients were given low doses of radioactive materials by injection or in their diet during a nationwide burst of nuclear research that mushroomed after World War II. The research of that period has come under heavy national scrutiny since late last year, when news accounts detailed heavy experimental doses of radiation in other cities: Highly radioactive plutonium was injected into 18 patients in Chicago, Rochester and San Francisco.
NEWS
January 18, 1990 | By Nancy Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
Facing a state-mandated deadline that is 18 months away, the Downingtown Area Regional Authority Monday night approved a plan that relies on an outdated technology to remove phosphorus from the Downingtown sewage-treatment plant's waste water. The $128,000 project calls for the installation of a chemical treatment system that even the project's designers acknowledged was less than optimal. "The July 1991 deadline can be met . . . using a standard chemical-feed system, but this is rapidly becoming an archaic technology," said Craig Coker, manager of the municipal services department for Engineering-Science Inc., the firm that designed the plan and also operates the Downingtown facility.
NEWS
December 25, 1989 | By GORDON S. LIVINGSTON
We were sitting down to Christmas Eve dinner at the Seventh Surgical Hospital, Blackhorse Base Camp, Republic of Vietnam. The year was 1968. It was a quiet night in the war, and the doctors and nurses were looking forward to an evening eating turkey, exchanging presents and longing to be elsewhere. The bad news came, as it always did, from the night radio operator who appeared at the side of the hospital commander, whispering in his ear. "Ladies and gentlemen," the colonel said, "we have casualties coming in. " This group had heard these words before and quietly moved to the triage area.
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