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Phosphorus

NEWS
January 22, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The orange flare along I-95 near Castor Avenue isn't lit anymore. It used to burn off excess methane produced at this Philadelphia sewage treatment plant. But with the completion of a $47.5 million project, the gas now is transformed into heat and electricity, putting the plant front and center in a sewage paradigm shift. These days, the stinky sludge, the stuff of our toilets, has a new future. Experts see not an abomination, but a resource. "We are just at the beginning of what we can do with sewage," said Allison Deines, director of special projects at the Water Environment Research Foundation, a Virginia-based nonprofit for wastewater and storm water issues.
NEWS
September 24, 2002 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New Jersey officials pledged yesterday to establish tough pollution standards on 159 sections of rivers and lakes by next summer, setting limits on such pollutants as fecal coliform bacteria and phosphorus. Among South Jersey waterways likely to be affected are stretches of the Cooper and Delaware Rivers and the Rancocas Creek. The head of one environmental group said she was pleased with the announcement, but said New Jersey had a long way to go, noting that Pennsylvania already had set standards for hundreds of rivers and streams.
NEWS
August 6, 1987
A scheduling conflict prevented Gov. Casey from attending the opening yesterday of a "summer summit" on the Chesapeake Bay, hosted by Virginia Gov. Gerald L. Baliles. In his place was Pennsylvania Environmental Resources Secretary Arthur S. Davis, who joined Maryland Gov. Donald Schaefer, Washington Mayor Marion Barry and federal environmental officials for the two- day meeting. It's unfortunate Gov. Casey couldn't attend because he would have been able to personally deliver some encouraging news.
NEWS
October 17, 1998 | By Todd Bishop, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The state Department of Environmental Protection vowed yesterday to more frequently assess sewer plants in Bucks County for patterns of overcapacity. The promise was prompted by a restriction on new connections to the area's primary treatment facility that was imposed after capacity was exceeded. Joseph A. Feola, DEP southeast regional director, said the department would evaluate the volume of flows into the sewage-treatment plants every month to determine whether restrictions and additional planning are needed.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | By Joe Fite, Special to The Inquirer
For years, Hatfield Borough residents have received sewer bills that were the lowest in the area. During that time, state and federal agencies have been after the borough to upgrade its sewage-treatment system. Within the next two months, both the low sewer bills and treatment facility problems will disappear. The Borough Council unanimously passed an ordinance at its meeting Wednesday night setting a quarterly base sewer rate of $25 per household. Users also will be charged $4 per 1,000 gallons of water used.
NEWS
October 4, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a move that seems to fly in the face of its moniker - the Garden State - New Jersey is getting ready to put the pinch on fertilizer. Bills that would limit fertilizer's use on lawns - restricting everything from what kind can be applied, to when and where it can be put down - are before the state Legislature, and are shaping up to be the nation's most restrictive. Despite some industry opposition, supporters expect to have a final version on the governor's desk by year's end. A major focus is to help turn around troubled Barnegat Bay in Ocean County.
LIVING
August 1, 1994 | By Clare Aigner Fleishman, FOR THE INQUIRER
Your bones crave attention. While Americans fastidiously coddle hearts and fret over waistlines, their skeletons are fast resembling palaces with rampant termite damage. Osteoporosis, a condition that leads to fracturing of brittle bones, is a silent epidemic. Silent because the breaks come long after the disease begins. And epidemic because it results in more than 1.5 million fractures a year, largely in those over 50, and at an estimated cost to society of $10 billion a year.
NEWS
June 6, 2011 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
It looked - for a moment - like one of science's deepest questions was cracking open last December. That's when a NASA-funded team announced that it had found a completely new kind of life in California's arsenic-rich Mono Lake. At a news conference, the researchers said they had discovered an arsenic-based organism - its very DNA infused with the toxic metal. In touting their own findings, they left many viewers with the impression that this bug had sprung from nonliving matter independent of all known life.
NEWS
June 29, 2006
'Carbon dioxide: It's what we breathe out and plants breathe in. They call it pollution; we call it life. " That paradox expressed by the free-market Competitive Enterprise Institute is being used to counter former Vice President Al Gore's scary global warming documentary, An Inconvenient Truth. How could a life-giving gas be dangerous to our planet? What right does a president or Congress have to regulate it as if it were smog, acid rain, or arsenic? Those are the central questions the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to answer by hearing Massachusetts v. Environmental Protection Agency next fall.
NEWS
November 11, 1997 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A dispute over how Chester County will dole out its federal community-development funds for next year flared up at the county commissioners' meeting yesterday, with officials from South Coatesville and Modena contending they were shortchanged. This morning, the parties will try to iron out their differences at a special meeting at South Coatesville Borough Hall. At issue is an aging sewage-treatment plant in South Coatesville used by both communities that was dumping too much phosphorus into the West Branch of the Brandywine Creek, according to state environmental officials.
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