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Phosphorus

NEWS
November 11, 1997 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A dispute over how Chester County will dole out its federal community-development funds for next year flared up at the county commissioners' meeting yesterday, with officials from South Coatesville and Modena contending they were shortchanged. This morning, the parties will try to iron out their differences at a special meeting at South Coatesville Borough Hall. At issue is an aging sewage-treatment plant in South Coatesville used by both communities that was dumping too much phosphorus into the West Branch of the Brandywine Creek, according to state environmental officials.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
It's not going to get us all. The killer cell that has ravaged fish in parts of Maryland and North Carolina isn't likely to turn up soon in Philadelphia, the leading expert on the "cell from hell" said yesterday. "No, it has not been found in fast-flowing areas. It has not been found in Pennsylvania," aquatic botanist JoAnn Burkholder of North Carolina State University told representatives of the Environmental Protection Agency at Philadelphia. Burkholder said that, given the warm, sluggish waters preferred by the fish-killing microorganism Pfiesteria, it is it unlikely to advance much farther in our direction than the inland bays where it's been detected in Delaware.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | BY KATHLEEN SHEA Daily News wire services, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post and Good Housekeeping magazine contributed to this report
A DIRTY JOB: How bad is working life at the post office? A) By its own reckoning, about a quarter of all unfair labor practice complaints to the National Labor Relations Board have to do with the U.S. mail operation. B) The postal service's in-house hot line for employees to dime out potentially violent co-workers takes about 10,000 calls a year. DIRTY JOB II: The type of co-worker scientifically proven most likely to become violent on the job? Feuding experts argue that it's A)
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | By Tom Linafelt, Special to The Inquirer
It's official: West Chester residents face rising sewer rates for the next 10 years, starting July 1 with a 30 percent increase. The Borough Council approved the increases Wednesday to augment an ailing sewer fund that would have run out of money before paying salaries and expenses for the first quarter of 1991. Besides the July increase, the ordinance raises rates by 20 percent on Jan. 1, 1991, 5 percent in 1992 and 15 percent in 1993. The ordinance provides for additional increases each year through 1999.
FOOD
December 5, 1990 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
TUNA TSORIS Bet you thought you'd heard the last about dolphin-safe tuna. Wrong. In an angry parting of the ways, several environmental groups allege that the Thailand-based parent company of Bumble Bee Seafoods Inc. has not lived up to its promise to buy only tuna caught by such methods. Officials of Bumble Bee, H. J. Heinz's StarKist Seafood Co. and Van Kamp Seafood Co. Inc.'s Chicken of the Sea brand pledged in April not to buy tuna caught in ways that harm the marine mammals.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
The Air Force this week is expected to answer a complaint filed in federal court by a New Jersey environmental group alleging 661 violations of the Clean Water Act. The New Jersey Public Interest Research Group filed the complaint May 30 in Trenton against McGuire Air Force Base in Burlington County, contending that the base was discharging carcinogens into a tributary of the Delaware River. The complaint stated that McGuire exceeded its permit requirements for discharging treated waste water from its sewage-treatment facility into Crosswicks Creek 661 times since June 1984.
NEWS
August 9, 1990 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
ANTI-AIDS AGENT Will the cure for AIDS carry a label reading Made in Japan? Well, a Japanese consortium says it has developed an agent that, in test-tube experiments, destroyed 90 percent of cells infected by the AIDS virus. Sumitomo Chemical, one of the partners in the consortium, hopes within the year to start U.S. clinical tests on the agent - composed of ribosome (made from phosphorus liptide and cholesterol) and a peptide of the protein film CD4. UNEASY RIDERS Don't let your children ride in the backs of pickup trucks.
NEWS
September 9, 1989 | By John Way Jennings, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer correspondent Mike Franolich contributed to this story
New Jersey State Police are investigating a series of bizarre Thursday night incidents that included the mysterious landing of a helicopter at Fort Dix and a report of gunshots in an area of the sprawling military reservation near the Burlington-Ocean County line. Rebecca Wriggle, a spokeswoman for the base, said a civilian helicopter landed briefly at 7:50 p.m. at a firing range on the eastern portion of the facility. Military police approached it, but the helicopter took off. She said military police spotted the helicopter again at 9 p.m. near Route 539 in Plumstead Township, Ocean County, and called the state police, which dispatched two helicopters and patrol cars.
FOOD
March 8, 1989 | Special to the Daily News
Facts about potatoes: Although there are more than 400 varieties of potatoes, but as Bert Greene notes in the classic ingredient book "Greene on Greens," "ask for any of 396 at your supermarket and you will be met with . . . a vacant stare. " Most potatoes sold in the United States come from Florida, California, Maine, New York or Idaho. Greene advises: "Choose weighty potatoes that are firm, relatively clean and smooth. Avoid anything with sprouts, softness, bruises or green patches.
NEWS
May 7, 1987 | By Bill G. Lowe, Special to The Inquirer
Rutledge Borough Council is moving to amend its flood-plain ordinance to bring the borough into compliance with an amended state law. The borough amendment would prohibit the construction of a hospital, nursing home, jail or prison in the flood plain of Stoney Creek and would prohibit the storage of more than 550 gallons of "dangerous materials" in each lot there. Both these prohibitions are included in other borough ordinances, but the state requires them to be stated in the flood-plain ordinance for the borough to remain eligible for state funds.
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