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Photographer

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March 31, 1989 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
Joseph Sorrentino's photos of poor and homeless adults and children, on view at the Arts League, make us feel uncomfortable. No fearful looks cloud these faces, but there is an acid edge in this kind of contemporary picture - its hard surface revealing a poignant vulnerability. The emotional turf Sorrentino stakes out is a part of American culture that he approaches like a street photographer. He is not concerned with highly personal states of feeling. His subjects belong to the world of external experience.
NEWS
February 15, 2012
Lillian Bassman, 94, a magazine art director and fashion photographer who achieved renown in the 1940s and '50s with high-contrast, dreamy portraits of sylphlike models, then reemerged in the '90s as a fine-art photographer after a cache of lost negatives resurfaced, died Monday at her home in New York. Ms. Bassman entered the world of magazine editing and fashion photography as a protégé of Alexey Brodovitch, the renowned art director of Harper's Bazaar. In addition to providing innovative graphic design, she gave prominent display to future photographic stars like Richard Avedon, Robert Frank, and Louis Faurer, whose work whetted her appetite to become a photographer herself.
NEWS
December 2, 2012
Ken Regan, a photojournalist whose reputation for discretion earned him a backstage pass to the private realms of rock stars and other celebrities, including Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, died last Sunday in Manhattan. The cause was cancer, his daughter Suzanne Regan said. Mr. Regan was the official photographer for the Rolling Stones on several tours in the 1970s and Kennedy's unofficial personal photographer in the last four decades of his life. He was also the official photographer for Bob Dylan's Rolling Thunder Revue tour in 1975, and the Live Aid concert in 1985.
NEWS
October 31, 2011
Barry Feinstein, 80, a photographer who chronicled the lives of seminal rock 'n' roll stars of the 1960s, and who was perhaps best known for the stark portrait of Bob Dylan on the cover of the 1964 album The Times They Are A-Changin' , died Oct. 20 near his home in Woodstock, N.Y. Besides his work with Dylan, Mr. Feinstein established his reputation as one of rock's semiofficial official chroniclers with two 1970 photographs: one of Janis Joplin,...
SPORTS
August 6, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
NASCAR chairman Bill France wonders whether Tony Stewart might have been provoked into hitting a photographer after a 12th-place finish in the Brickyard 400. While NASCAR continued its investigation yesterday, France said he would be interested in seeing pictures or footage of the confrontation, if any exist. Stewart punched Gary Mook, a freelance photographer for the Indianapolis Star, after Sunday's race. Mook was trying to take pictures of Stewart as he hustled through the garage area, when Stewart stopped and hit him in the chest.
NEWS
May 9, 2011
German-born photographer Gunter Sachs, 78, best known for his playboy lifestyle and brief marriage to French actress Brigitte Bardot, has committed suicide, his family said Sunday. In a statement released by his family at his request, Mr. Sachs said he chose to end his life after concluding that he was suffering from an incurable degenerative disease affecting his memory and ability to communicate. "I have always stood up to big challenges," the statement said. It provided no details on the timing or circumstances of his death, but German weekly Focus reported that Mr. Sachs shot himself Saturday at his home in the exclusive Swiss Alpine resort of Gstaad.
NEWS
March 15, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Lawrence S. Williams, 98, a prominent Philadelphia photographer who chronicled World War II, took pictures of two presidents, then focused his camera on the city's architecture, died Saturday, March 5, of pneumonia at Shannondell at Valley Forge. Mr. Williams worked with city planner Edmund Bacon and the Philadelphia City Planning Commission on an ambitious project to document the cityscape as its buildings changed after 1950. The fruits of that effort became the Williams Collection, a treasure trove of 250,000 images that the Athenaeum of Philadelphia acquired in 2001.
NEWS
July 26, 1998 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Melchior DiGiacomo, a Bergen County, N.J., photographer, is not at odds with life. He likes the pungent aroma of life as it is being lived. What he is at odds with are many of the conventional practices and pieties of photojournalism and commercial photography. So he has been waging a lonely uphill battle to change this and introduce a little individuality - in particular with regard to that most hackneyed of subjects, wedding pictures that photographers are hired to take. When DiGiacomo photographs weddings, which he sometimes does between magazine picture assignments, he is always more interested in choosing expressive detail and in his ability to describe the nature of things rather than in the obvious facts of the event.
NEWS
December 2, 1994 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michael "Mike Reno" Garbesi, 53, a freelance photographer of political, entertainment and sports stars, died Tuesday at his home in South Philadelphia. Mr. Garbesi, known throughout Philadelphia as "Mike Reno," often cruised the city with cameras hanging off his neck and a press pass identifying him as a representative of the Philadelphia Exclusive News. "He was a self-employed freelance photographer and sold advertisements for the paper," said J.J. Palumbo, owner of the Exclusive News.
NEWS
May 25, 2011
Richard Steinheimer, 81, a master of railroad photography whose poetic images documented a half-century of trains and the landscape of the American West, has died. Mr. Steinheimer died May 4 at his Sacramento, Calif., home of Alzheimer's disease, said his wife, Shirley Burman "He's been called the Ansel Adams of the railroad-photography world," said Phil Hammond, director of the California State Railroad Museum. "He brought an artistic side to a field that is often associated with technology.
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NEWS
September 4, 2016
Portrait of a Photographer By Arthur Lubow Ecco. 752 pp. $21 Reviewed by Tara Murtha Street photographers always walk a tightrope between art and exploitation, and no American artist has walked a tightrope as taut as legendary New York photographer Diane Arbus. More than four decades since her death, the question of exploitation in her work is brought back to the fore with the publication of a stellar new biography and a summer exhibition of her early work. Last month, a major Arbus show opened at the Met Breuer building at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
NEWS
July 27, 2016
Fred Ward, 81, a Washington photographer who captured memorable images of the funeral of President John F. Kennedy and the Beatles' first American concert and who traveled the world on assignment for National Geographic magazine, died Tuesday at his home in Malibu, Calif. He had Alzheimer's disease, said his wife, Charlotte Ward. On his first day in Washington in 1962, Mr. Ward parked his Volkswagen van in the White House driveway, bounded inside, and picked up his credentials as a photographer for Black Star photo agency.
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Alexandra Villarreal, Staff Writer
In a photo, six Pashtun men sip tea in Kunduz province, blocks from where al-Qaeda devised the Sept. 11 attacks. The man most in focus has a scraggly beard tinged with gray. He looks strikingly similar to Osama bin Laden - or at least that's what Steve McCurry thought when he snapped the shot in 2002. In the background sits a picture of downtown Manhattan, with the twin towers looming above the skyline. "I don't know that they were even aware that that was New York and that was the World Trade Center," McCurry said.
NEWS
May 25, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
It took the click of a shutter for Mayor Kenney to turn sour. After a handful of reporters were invited to share a tour of Philadelphia's prisons Monday, Kenney quickly showed that he wasn't in the mood for guests. In the visitors lobby, he raised his hand to stop a photographer in mid-shot, then headed out of the room with a swift shake of his head. Twenty minutes, and a few more touchy interactions between the media and the mayor, later, everyone got the hint. "Does he want the media here?"
NEWS
April 5, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
How better to capture the spirit and variety of South Jersey artists than through the lenses of regional photographers? A one-of-a-kind exhibit, "Clique: South Jersey Artists by South Jersey Photographers," will be on display at the Perkins Center for the Arts in Collingswood through May 5. A free reception open to the public will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. Thursday. A second exhibit of "Clique" will be held from Sept. 16 through Oct. 18 at the Riverfront Renaissance Center for the Arts in Millville.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Arrested last year with cocaine and a pair of Hello Kitty girls' socks in his pockets, a former volunteer photographer for WXPN's Kids Corner radio show pleaded guilty Tuesday to child-pornography charges. Mark Wilkens, 58, told a federal judge that he routinely used his position to snap dozens of photos of young girls in various states of undress at station-sponsored children's events. His plea follows by eight months his arrest by Philadelphia police who caught him using a self-serve photo-developing kiosk at a Crescentville Walmart to develop his illicit images.
NEWS
March 15, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Lawrence S. Williams, 98, a prominent Philadelphia photographer who chronicled World War II, took pictures of two presidents, then focused his camera on the city's architecture, died Saturday, March 5, of pneumonia at Shannondell at Valley Forge. Mr. Williams worked with city planner Edmund Bacon and the Philadelphia City Planning Commission on an ambitious project to document the cityscape as its buildings changed after 1950. The fruits of that effort became the Williams Collection, a treasure trove of 250,000 images that the Athenaeum of Philadelphia acquired in 2001.
NEWS
February 17, 2016 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
A former Philadelphia Evening Bulletin photographer and lifelong beekeeper died after a fire engulfed his Delaware County house Monday morning. Bob Fox, who was reported to be 85, was at home in the 500 block of Strathmore Road in Haverford when the blaze erupted around 10 a.m. Neighbors, who confirmed his identity, said Fox was a widower with one daughter. She was not in the house when the fire broke out. The fire's cause was unknown. Fox took up beekeeping when he was a child, according to a profile in the Delaware County Daily Times in 2009.
SPORTS
January 21, 2016 | By Aaron Carter, Staff Writer
Preparing to capture Imhotep junior guard Daron Russell's 1,000th career point, a photographer wondered aloud Tuesday night, minutes before the Panthers hosted rival Martin Luther King. Russell, a 5-foot-11 point guard who can score in bunches, needed 13 points to reach the milestone. "He'll probably get it in the second half, right?" the photographer asked. The answer came with 1 minute, 23 seconds left in the first quarter after Russell hit a step-back three-pointer opposite the King bench, landing him squarely on 13 and 1,000 points.
NEWS
January 8, 2016
Robert de Gast, 79, a photographer whose 1970 book The Oystermen of the Chesapeake captured in harsh and unsentimental images the final days of America's last fishing fleet under sail and is regarded as one of the finest depictions of the watermen who make their living there, died of cancer Sunday at a Baltimore hospice. Dutch by birth, Mr. de Gast spent most of his life as a freelance photojournalist and commercial photographer on the shores of the Chesapeake Bay. He wrote and illustrated a half-dozen books, including one about the bay's lighthouses and two about cruising its tributaries.
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