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Photographer

NEWS
October 23, 2003 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Myron "Mike" Krasney, 91, of Willingboro, a longtime photographer who founded Abbey Studios in Philadelphia and chronicled the experiences of soldiers at war and artists during the Great Depression, died of congestive heart failure Oct. 15 at Lourdes Medical Center of Burlington County. Vivien Leigh, Laurence Olivier and printmaker Dox Thrash found their way into pictures taken by Mr. Krasney, who worked for the federal government during the Depression and World War II. Born in Ukraine, Mr. Krasney immigrated to the United States with his family in 1921.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
TOM TOROK tells the story of how he once escaped bodily injury thanks to Carl Breitinger. It was 1978, and Tom, as a reporter for the Courier-Post, had participated in some articles exposing corruption in Gloucester Township, N.J., stirring the ire of Democratic officials. Along came Carl Breitinger, then a photographer for the Bulletin, arriving at Democratic Party headquarters in all innocence. But he wore a beard, as Tom Torok did, and irate officials thought it was Torok back for more dirt.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1992 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
For most of this century, one of the marks of being rich and famous in Philadelphia was to have had your photograph taken by Bachrach. But a tradition that began here in 1915 is ending. Bachrach said yesterday it is closing its studio at 1611 Walnut St., along with studios in Chicago and San Francisco. Five studios will remain - Boston; Alexandria, Va., New York City, and two suburban New York locations, Morristown, N.J., and Greenwich, Ct. Why? "Because of terrible business conditions," says Louis "Chip" Bachrach, a fourth-generation descendant of the company's founder, and current chairman of the board.
NEWS
February 28, 1994 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Discharged from the Army in January 1944, Walter M. Faust was eager to return to his job as an Associated Press photographer in Philadelphia. But fate chose another path for him. A month after his discharge, his father asked him to photograph the Wanamaker Rose Show. The elder Faust, a former photographer who had opened a floral business, was chairman of the show. Walter took the pictures, and John Wanamaker Co. president John Rouse was impressed enough to tender a contract offer.
NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
The body of a man found Friday outside the Church of St. Asaph in Bala Cynwyd was that of the Philadelphia photographer Johnathan F. Zellars, police, his minister, and the Montgomery County coroner said. Zellars, 62, was found dead Friday morning by the sexton in a car parked on the grounds of the church on Conshohocken State Road in Lower Merion Township. Montgomery County Coroner Walter I. Hofman attributed the death to natural causes, likely brought on by a medical condition.
NEWS
October 13, 2009 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Perhaps, by sheer volume or the absence of merit, blogs that allow anyone to publish and cell phones that make photographers of us all ultimately will dull our reactions to the strife that surrounds us. But if that happens, don't blame Harvey Finkle. A documentary photographer whose black-and-white stills are extensively exhibited and published, Finkle records the struggles of individuals in need and the activists who rally on their behalf. At demonstrations where the cause was accessibility for the disabled, justice for the criminally accused, protection for workers, or respect for cultural difference, Finkle, now 75, has stood vigil for more than 30 years on Philadelphia's streets, training his lens on emotions that exceed words.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2004 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The claws are out in Hollywood. Fun couple Cameron Diaz and Justin Timberlake, who are like the prom king and queen of showbiz, were leaving the Chateau Marmont late last Saturday when they were set upon by paparazzi (that's Italian for "stalkers with Nikons"). Instead of cowering while the flashbulbs popped, Diaz allegedly went all Jackie Chan on one of the photographers. We worry about what kind of precedent this might set for other leading ladies, especially since, according to the paparazzo, after pummeling him into submission she snatched his camera.
NEWS
May 1, 1992 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
At 26, Nick Waplington is young enough to enjoy skateboarding and too young to be as good a photographer as he is. Judging by the current exhibition of his work at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, he seems to have sprung full-blown from the brow of Henri Cartier-Bresson or Robert Frank, except that Waplington doesn't owe anything to either of them. At least he says he doesn't. "At various stages throughout my career (imagine, at 26, talking about a career) I've been interested in various different photographers, until I got to the point where I wasn't interested in anyone anymore, and it was about time for me to go out there and do something different," he said the other day while a museum installation crew was putting the finishing touches on his show.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2013
SOME CALL HIM the Gordon Parks of Philly. To others, he's "Mr. Tribune. " Whatever you call Robert Mendelsohn, you'd be hard-pressed to find an African-American-oriented society event in recent years that he hasn't photographed for the Philadelphia Tribune , the Philadelphia Sunday Sun or another one of the papers he shoots for as a freelancer. And he does it all using public transportation. "He goes to places at nighttime that I wouldn't go without a car," laughed Jerry Mondesire, publisher of the Philadelphia Sunday Sun . "The beauty of it is that he gets along with so many kinds of people.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Sarah Alderman was a real estate agent a few years ago, clients said they would live anywhere in Chester County - except Coatesville. A couple of years later, she came across a shirt she assumes someone made as a joke that outraged her. The front said "Friends don't let friends live in Coatesville. " "I think the reputation is a bigger issue than any real issue," Alderman said. Nothing can change for Coatesville until perceptions of the city change, she said. As Coatesville continues to work toward a revitalization that has stalled for decades, Alderman, 34, is one of the people trying to improve the city's image for residents and potential businesses and developers.
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