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SPORTS
October 12, 2012 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports
FOR WHO? For what? Forever. Forever, Ricky Watters will live with his infamous dismissal, his implication that his health was more important than winning a football game. It is what many fans will remember, with disgust, on Sunday when he addresses them as an honorary captain before the Eagles play the Lions. It is ugly irony, then, that, forever, Watters will live with pain he suffers from carrying and catching footballs at Veterans Stadium, among other places; pain, from head to toe. "I got it all," he said.
NEWS
August 26, 2011 | Staff Report
The FBI is seeking help in finding a fugitive radical who allegedly blinded a police officer with acid during an antiapartheid protest in New York 30 years ago. The FBI is making the appeal here because Donna Joan Borup has family ties to Philadelphia and Horsham. Kelly Langmesser, a spokeswoman for the FBI office in New York, says a new agent has taken over the case and is hoping that Borup has dropped her guard after three decades on the run. According to the FBI, Borup was charged with throwing acid into the face of Port Authority Police Officer Evan Goodstein during a antiapartheid protest at JFK Airport on Sept.
NEWS
July 21, 1987 | By R.A. Zaldivar and Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The American public is hearing a response from John M. Poindexter that apprently was seldom heard by his superior officers: "I don't recall. " Poindexter has testified during the Iran-contra hearings that he forgot or cannot remember some of the more controversial actions he was involved in during his year as national security adviser. Yet ever since he graduated first in his Naval Academy class 29 years ago, Poindexter has impressed commanders and peers alike with his ability to absorb vast amounts of raw information and retain the crucial details.
NEWS
February 19, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A woman of grace and intellect who savored life by participating fully in it, Lilian Streeter Lucas Chance of Malvern once ran a biophysical research facility as well as a horse farm, all while managing 100 rental properties and raising eight children and four stepchildren. In her spare time, she gardened, cooked, and served for a time as president of the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Ms. Chance died Wednesday, Feb. 13, of complications from pneumonia.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer Contributing were the Chicago Tribune, the Orlando Sentinel and the Dallas Morning News
A national campaign is under way to get paid leave guarantees for workers when there is a medical emergency or a new child in the family. Advocates for the federal Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 have launched the effort. That law protects workers' jobs when they have a family medical emergency or a birth by requiring employers of 50 or more workers to allow up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave. But about 64 percent of employees didn't take the leave because they couldn't afford it, according to a congressional report.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1997 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Good Will Hunting, a smart and extremely likable picture about a smart and extremely volatile guy, does a couple of things besides offering two hours of compelling entertainment. The first thing is that it confirms Matt Damon, who plays Will Hunting (yeah, the title is a little too cute) and wrote the picture with costar and pal Ben Affleck, as a newcomer with real talent. Convincing as an idealistic law student in John Grisham's The Rainmaker, Damon delivers a remarkable performance here as a "Southy" from working-class Boston.
NEWS
June 15, 1992 | by Rick Selvin, Daily News Staff Writer
Am I interested in auditioning to be on Bill Cosby's new quiz show? You bet your life! It'd be great fun. And, hey, a Stu Bykofsky column two weeks ago said partners on the program could walk away sharing more than $16,000. So I dialed the phone number. "When can you make it?" asked a woman at Cosby Central. "Can you come Thursday at 10 a.m.?" This Thursday? Ten a.m.? But that's during working hours . . . So I went to the boss. "How long will it take?" she asked.
NEWS
November 13, 1987 | By FRANK DOUGHERTY, Daily News Staff Writer
A Polish Christian whose covert missions into the Warsaw Ghetto and Belzec death camp provided the Free World with the first accounts of "The Final Solution" says it was the Nazis who made his forays a success. "It was pure Gestapo greed. They were so corrupt. If they arrested you as a spy, it was easy to bribe your way out of a prison camp trip with gold or American currency," explained Professor Jan Karski. Karski, 73, said that by bribing the Gestapo guards - Hitler's civilian secret police - he was able to slip safely across the borders of his occupied Polish homeland with first-person accounts of Nazi atrocities that then were forwarded to President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
SPORTS
April 15, 2011 | By MARK KRAM, kramm@phillynews.com
TNT broadcaster Kevin Harlan likes to say of Sixers coach Doug Collins, his old sidekick: "Nothing surprises me with that guy. " But when asked how he expected the Sixers to do in the playoffs against the Miami Heat beginning tomorrow, Harlan said it would be "spectacular" if Philadelphia won just one game. "Doug would probably cringe if he heard that," said Harlan, who will team up with analyst Reggie Miller and courtside reporter Craig Sager for Game 2 on Monday when the series moves from ABC to TNT. "Doug would say, 'Win one game!
NEWS
September 27, 1987 | By William F. Buckley Jr
Sen. Joseph Biden may take consolation from the story of another plagiarist, as related to me 30 years ago by the late screen actor Adolphe Menjou. The spiffily dressed, urbane actor, best suited for roles either as urbane blue blood, or else as urbane blue blood's urbane butler, was a gentleman of considerable learning who attended Cornell University. The crisis arose when Dean Malott was inaugurated as president of Cornell in 1951. A few weeks later, the New Yorker magazine ran one of its devastating "Funny Coincidence Department" pieces.
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SPORTS
December 20, 2013 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Staff Writer
MIKE TYSON has snorted enough cocaine to line a football field. Snorted it before some fights, then used somebody else's clean urine to fool the testers. Brags about it in his new book. Snorted when he was happy, snorted when he was sad, which was most of the time. That makes him an addict. A recovering addict, because he is taking it one day at a time. Mike Tyson has been drinking since he was an infant. Cheap hooch, then. He says he prefers Hennessy's now, when he topples off the wagon.
NEWS
February 19, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A woman of grace and intellect who savored life by participating fully in it, Lilian Streeter Lucas Chance of Malvern once ran a biophysical research facility as well as a horse farm, all while managing 100 rental properties and raising eight children and four stepchildren. In her spare time, she gardened, cooked, and served for a time as president of the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Ms. Chance died Wednesday, Feb. 13, of complications from pneumonia.
SPORTS
October 12, 2012 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports
FOR WHO? For what? Forever. Forever, Ricky Watters will live with his infamous dismissal, his implication that his health was more important than winning a football game. It is what many fans will remember, with disgust, on Sunday when he addresses them as an honorary captain before the Eagles play the Lions. It is ugly irony, then, that, forever, Watters will live with pain he suffers from carrying and catching footballs at Veterans Stadium, among other places; pain, from head to toe. "I got it all," he said.
NEWS
August 26, 2011 | Staff Report
The FBI is seeking help in finding a fugitive radical who allegedly blinded a police officer with acid during an antiapartheid protest in New York 30 years ago. The FBI is making the appeal here because Donna Joan Borup has family ties to Philadelphia and Horsham. Kelly Langmesser, a spokeswoman for the FBI office in New York, says a new agent has taken over the case and is hoping that Borup has dropped her guard after three decades on the run. According to the FBI, Borup was charged with throwing acid into the face of Port Authority Police Officer Evan Goodstein during a antiapartheid protest at JFK Airport on Sept.
SPORTS
April 15, 2011 | By MARK KRAM, kramm@phillynews.com
TNT broadcaster Kevin Harlan likes to say of Sixers coach Doug Collins, his old sidekick: "Nothing surprises me with that guy. " But when asked how he expected the Sixers to do in the playoffs against the Miami Heat beginning tomorrow, Harlan said it would be "spectacular" if Philadelphia won just one game. "Doug would probably cringe if he heard that," said Harlan, who will team up with analyst Reggie Miller and courtside reporter Craig Sager for Game 2 on Monday when the series moves from ABC to TNT. "Doug would say, 'Win one game!
FOOD
September 25, 2008 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
A side of Tuscan beef is no match for an Italian chef with a cleaver. But as young Marc Vetri watched a master dismantle a Chianina steer into steaks in his Bergamo kitchen, then grill them over an oak fire for lunch, he was simply awestruck. "Always be able to do everything with your hands," Graziato Pinato told Vetri, then in the final months of his yearlong training at Taverna Colleoni dell'Angelo. Recounted in Vetri's new cookbook, Il Viaggio di Vetri (Ten Speed Press)
BUSINESS
July 14, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer Contributing were the Chicago Tribune, the Orlando Sentinel and the Dallas Morning News
A national campaign is under way to get paid leave guarantees for workers when there is a medical emergency or a new child in the family. Advocates for the federal Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 have launched the effort. That law protects workers' jobs when they have a family medical emergency or a birth by requiring employers of 50 or more workers to allow up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave. But about 64 percent of employees didn't take the leave because they couldn't afford it, according to a congressional report.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1997 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Good Will Hunting, a smart and extremely likable picture about a smart and extremely volatile guy, does a couple of things besides offering two hours of compelling entertainment. The first thing is that it confirms Matt Damon, who plays Will Hunting (yeah, the title is a little too cute) and wrote the picture with costar and pal Ben Affleck, as a newcomer with real talent. Convincing as an idealistic law student in John Grisham's The Rainmaker, Damon delivers a remarkable performance here as a "Southy" from working-class Boston.
NEWS
June 15, 1992 | by Rick Selvin, Daily News Staff Writer
Am I interested in auditioning to be on Bill Cosby's new quiz show? You bet your life! It'd be great fun. And, hey, a Stu Bykofsky column two weeks ago said partners on the program could walk away sharing more than $16,000. So I dialed the phone number. "When can you make it?" asked a woman at Cosby Central. "Can you come Thursday at 10 a.m.?" This Thursday? Ten a.m.? But that's during working hours . . . So I went to the boss. "How long will it take?" she asked.
NEWS
November 13, 1987 | By FRANK DOUGHERTY, Daily News Staff Writer
A Polish Christian whose covert missions into the Warsaw Ghetto and Belzec death camp provided the Free World with the first accounts of "The Final Solution" says it was the Nazis who made his forays a success. "It was pure Gestapo greed. They were so corrupt. If they arrested you as a spy, it was easy to bribe your way out of a prison camp trip with gold or American currency," explained Professor Jan Karski. Karski, 73, said that by bribing the Gestapo guards - Hitler's civilian secret police - he was able to slip safely across the borders of his occupied Polish homeland with first-person accounts of Nazi atrocities that then were forwarded to President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
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