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Photography

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2012 | BY ROBERTA FALLON, For the Daily News
WHEN Stephen Perloff launched The Photo Review in 1976, it was a golden age for photography in Philadelphia. More than three decades later, he thinks a new golden age is dawning here. "We're getting back to the energy and vibrancy of the earlier time. It's quite heartening," said the self-taught photographer, whose publication has kept him at the center of all things photographic in the region. Philadelphia today has three community photo art centers: Project Basho, the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center and the Light Room.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
A two-dimensional, black-dotted dressing table leans against the stairwell of Penn State Ogontz's library. The dressing table's mirror reflects an empty highway winding through the mountains. Upstairs, in another picture, a boy walks along a modern city sidewalk amid lush green foliage and the frescoed ruins of ancient Pompeii. This is photography? Instead of celebrating the 150th anniversary of photography with a look at the past, the Ogontz Library Gallery is exhibiting the cutting edge of this medium.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Works Gallery, which showed photography in its early years, has returned to the medium with an exhibition of recent works by Dick Kagan, a former woodworker who once operated his own gallery on South Street. A chronic back condition forced Kagan to give up woodworking several years ago. He turned to photography, and this show, of 12 black-and-white images made in Italy last year, marks the introduction of his new career. The series is called "Light Studies," and that describes them perfectly.
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | By Victoria Donohue, Inquirer Art Critic
Haverford College has one of the most impressive photography collections in the region. And, to celebrate the 150th birthday of photography, the school is displaying some of its best. For the next month, 120 works from 102 photographers will be shown at the school's Comfort Gallery in a show that offers useful historical perspective on this art form. Many sesquicentennial shows have looked at the early years of photography but included little if any current work. Faculty member William E. Williams, who put together this show, deserves credit for making the effort to include strong contemporary photos.
NEWS
August 12, 1990 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
As the century draws to a close, and photography celebrates its 150th birthday, there has yet to be a definitive historic review of Montgomery County photography. Judith A. Meier is attempting to rectify that by providing an exhibit, "Early Montgomery County Photographers," at the Historical Society of Montgomery County. This serves to bring public attention to people who worked in relative obscurity. The photographers featured are distinguished by their choice of subject matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2001 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
"Photo-Synthesis" at the Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts is a relatively small exhibition about a large topic - recent innovations in photography, especially those that involve advanced technology. It's not a show likely to surprise anyone conversant with how the medium has evolved over the last decade or two. Many of the technical and stylistic innovations by the 17 artists in the show have been exposed elsewhere. In this regard, "Photo-Synthesis" is typical of exhibitions that circulate among small, second-tier museums and art centers outside of major urban areas.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1988 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
The bear hug given photography by the Print Club's latest "annual" starts the New Year off on a bright note. Photography has never developed in a straight-line way, but has grown like Topsy, with the people along its various fronts not very knowledgeable about each other's work. So, competitive group shows are occasionally useful for exploring the broad range of current activity; they inform photographers themselves as much as the general public. The current event is the photography exhibition of the Print Club's 63d Annual International Competition.
NEWS
March 16, 2003 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
In its variety, this dog show is rich. Not an actual dog show, mind you, but a traveling exhibit, "A Thousand Hounds: A Walk With the Dogs Through the History of Photography" at the Delaware Art Museum's temporary home on the Wilmington riverfront. This theme show has a thread to follow. Well thought out and put together in 10 sections by curators Raymond Merrittand Miles Barth, the event has been given a historical structure. There are few gallery exhibits where the note of affection for a subject is struck more genuinely than it is here.
NEWS
September 14, 2003 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
A group show by three dissimilar photographers of Netherlandish background is featured at the Holland Art House in West Chester. Front and center are large-scale surreal landscapes by Gabriel Stillwater, a Colorado-born resident of Washington who trained as a painter in the Flemish Renaissance tradition in the Netherlands, where he lived until last year. Stillwater's work demonstrates the inability of the camera to tell even a significant part of the truth that we might expect from photography.
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NEWS
April 20, 2016
Journalism Public service: The Associated Press, for a series of articles documenting the use of slave labor in the commercial seafood industry in Indonesia and Thailand. Breaking news reporting: Los Angeles Times staff, for coverage of the San Bernardino massacre and the ensuing investigation. Investigative reporting: Leonora LaPeter Anton and Anthony Cormier, of the Tampa Bay Times, and Michael Braga, of the Sarasota Herald-Tribune, for a project on escalating violence and neglect in Florida mental hospitals.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
When Gilberto Gonzalez started getting into trouble as a kid in South Kensington, his father responded by getting him a camera. Peering through the viewfinder gave him a new perspective. "I saw a bigger world once I had my camera," said Gonzalez, 51, still an amateur photographer, and now a designer for Community College of Philadelphia. The photos saved him, and he saved the photos - for years, though he wasn't sure for what. "But I found the need for them now," he said recently.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Stephen Dunbar, 64, of Moorestown, who retired in 2014 as head of the library and media center at John Witherspoon Middle School in Princeton, died of complications from Lewy body dementia, on Sunday, March 13, at home. Born in Hartford, Conn., Mr. Dunbar graduated from King Low Heywood Thomas, a college preparatory school in Stamford, Conn. He earned a bachelor's degree in photography at Hampshire College in Amherst, Mass., in 1976. After earning master's degrees in video production and in education at Fairfield (Conn.)
NEWS
December 22, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
It turns out, tintypes aren't just for Civil War soldiers. They're for bicyclists and drummers and surfers and judges and college professors - anyone who wants to engage an 1860s photographic process to forever fix their black-and-white image onto a small piece of metal, to embrace an old process that's become suddenly hip. It's the steampunk of photography. And, after fading from popularity at about the time Sitting Bull was surrendering to federal troops, it's making a small, stylish comeback, led by a few specialist photographers, prominent among them Nashville-based Giles Clement.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
The verb taking - as in, taking pictures - has, perhaps, never been more apt than when applied to street photographer Mark Cohen. He walks by a subject, snaps a photo without a glance through the viewfinder, and is gone. He does not ask permission. "When you ask permission to take a picture," he said, "it destroys the subtlety and the chance and the drama of the small theft that happens. " Cohen has stolen thousands of such moments - more than 50 years' worth of daily life in the small cities of northeastern Pennsylvania.
NEWS
October 3, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Max Perchick, 99, of Philadelphia, a management engineer for industry and with the U.S. Defense Department for many years, died Friday, Sept. 25, of respiratory failure at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Born and reared in South Philadelphia, Mr. Perchick was a longtime resident of Center City. Starting in the 1970s, he lived along Benjamin Franklin Parkway. He moved to John F. Kennedy Boulevard in the early 2000s. He attended Temple University at night and worked at the Defense Supply Center.
NEWS
July 5, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Karen Warrington is anything but a shrinking violet. She resists categories. Early on, back in the 1950s and 1960s, she studied dance with Sydney King and then became a member of Arthur Hall's Afro American Dance Ensemble. Always interested in writing and communication and politics, she moved into journalism, becoming news director for WDAS radio, and has been an off-and-on reporter and talk host on black radio in the city for nearly 40 years. From 1984 to 1992, she was press secretary for Mayor W. Wilson Goode.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2015 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
BETWEEN 200 and 500 people typically tour Kensington's Crane Arts building on the second Thursday of every month. Tomorrow, the artsy crowd can see photography by 25 Philadelphia public and charter high-school students. "Teen Photo" is an exhibition in the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, where, for the past seven months, kids have been coming after school to learn how to shoot, process, print, display, discuss and hone their photography. Kensington CAPA art teacher Joshua Kleiman began leading the free program in 2010.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Her arms draped in Hermes Birkin handbags that retail for $13,000 each, a laughing Linda Lightman had to confess: She doesn't own a single one herself. "But they're coveted by many," she added with considerable appreciation. Such longing will translate into $25 million in sales this year for Linda's Stuff, the online luxury-consignment business Lightman started 15 years ago. At eBay, where a projected $83 billion in gross merchandise value was transacted last year, Linda's Stuff is considered a superstar.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2015 | BY JENELLE JANCI, Daily News Staff Writer jancij@phillynews.com, 215-568-5906
MICHAEL PENN has a hard time sitting still. Talking with a reporter one recent day in Old City, the neighborhood he's called home for 21 years, he remarked that the conversation would be the longest time anyone had seen him sedentary.His restless nature could explain why he's deep into multiple photography projects, from his street-art epic "The Philadelphia Project" to his ode to the beloved but development-threatened Center City diner Little Pete's....
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