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Photography

NEWS
May 13, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Despite the continuing agonies of war, deep corruption, and economic dislocation in Afghanistan, high school students there leaped at the opportunity to join with Philadelphia counterparts in an unusual photography project. The fruits of their collaboration - an effort to capture images of freedom, religious expression, protest, and other instances of public involvement in Kabul and Philadelphia - will open simultaneously Friday at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia and the National Museum of Afghanistan in Kabul.
NEWS
June 14, 1988 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Several years ago a slick magazine planned a story about couples it deemed uncommonly "well-dressed. " For reasons known only to the editors, recalled world-class photojournalist Mary Ellen Mark - whose sartorial splendor runs to comfortable black cotton and silver bangles and beads - she and her husband, award-winning filmmaker Martin Bell, made it to the magazine's short list. "Well they came out to the studio, took one look at Martin" - who favors Hawaiian shirts, Canal Co. blue jeans and canvas sneakers - "and that was the end of that," Mark teased one recent afternoon, as she padded about her SoHo loft in black sneakers, preparing to edit pictures from a recent assignment in Brazil for National Geographic, and packing for a trip to Budapest to shoot publicity stills on the set of an HBO movie about Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal.
NEWS
February 24, 2002 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Forget art that's the epitome of inaccessibility and arty elitism. The wide dispersion of photography group shows nowadays across our metropolitan area is not often obvious, but such displays are plentiful and sometimes they permeate the scene, as now. There is looking in some of this work, and in other photos there is feeling, thinking and built-in social commentary. Still other pictures may tease the well-established traditions. This week, three recently opened displays offer three very different takes on regional photography by getting the pictures out there among you. Abington Art Center is at bat with its juried "Photography 2002: Pennsylvania Photographers" show, a 19th biennial event.
REAL_ESTATE
April 18, 2010 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
When Steve and Ann Kravitz moved back to South Jersey from Pittsburgh after being away for 25 years, they were looking for more than a new address. They were looking for a total change in lifestyle. "We didn't need the big house or the big lawn anymore," Ann recalls. "When we left Cherry Hill for Pittsburgh and had two children, we tried to replicate our lives, even down to the neighborhood swim club. This time, it was different. We were empty-nesters, and we were looking for simplicity and convenience.
NEWS
January 23, 1994 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Photographer Michael Kahn of Unionville isn't afraid to break those rules of composition your high school art teacher told you about. In a Chester County landscape, for example, Kahn might place a tree or some other subject right in the center of the photograph. His still-lifes of mottled pears or glossy apples are not always arranged in the standard odd number. Often, a single item is placed on the windowsill of the old tenant house near his home, where Kahn does much of his studio work.
NEWS
August 15, 1993 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
If you aren't intimately involved in photography as an artist, historian or collector, chances are you haven't heard of Albert Renger-Patzsch. A German who lived from 1897 to 1966, he led the rebellion against "art photography" in favor of an approach that emphasized the medium's ability to describe in highly clarified detail. Ironically, this apostle of "objectivity" produced dozens of images that are savored today for their transcendent beauty as much as for their fidelity to nature.
NEWS
January 19, 1992 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Life for the homeless is unrelievedly bleak: That's the picture most of us get from the news. But 9-year-old Chris Heflin had no message in mind the day he and his brother, Norman, went to play on snow-covered railroad tracks behind their shelter in Alexandria, Va. What Chris did have was a camera. And as his brother leaned down to pick a flattened penny from the tracks, Chris lifted the viewfinder to his eye. Click. Homeless life is grim, but it also has moments like this - of joy and affection, of utter ordinariness - that most of us never see. Thanks to former UPI photographer Jim Hubbard, however, thousands of such moments have been preserved on film by the Washington-area children who call those shelters home.
NEWS
September 9, 2007 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER CONTRIBUTING ART CRITIC
For the public, the new galleries and expanded library are the heart of the Art Museum's Ruth and Raymond G. Perelman Building. Now visitors can at last appreciate the depth and range of several specialized collections, including photography, design, sculpture, and costume and textiles. They can do this through five inaugural exhibitions, which begin just inside the building's main entrance in the Exhibition Gallery, a large space ideally suited to displaying sculpture. For the opening, the museum has stocked this window-lined room with about a dozen modern and contemporary pieces, from Pablo Picasso's bronze Man With a Lamb to Sol LeWitt's multicolored Splotch, in which the rigorous minimalist and conceptualist becomes uncharacteristically playful.
NEWS
September 11, 2009 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Frank Burd gets nervous in large crowds, and fears going into Center City alone. His youngest child just left for college, and some days, he feels isolated and overwhelmed. Burd, widely known as a victim of student violence, rarely ventures out of his house without a camera. And pictures, always central to his life, have taken on a new significance. "Photographs have served as my third hand," Burd said. "I shoot because it feels good. I'm doing this for me. " Tonight, an exhibit of his work opens at the University of the Arts.
NEWS
February 4, 2001 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Anyone interested in photography will find plenty to see at the Delaware Art Museum. On the heels of the sold-out opening reception for "Linda McCartney's Sixties - A Portrait of an Era" is an exhibit on the history of photography that opens Friday. "An American Century of Photography: From Dry-plate to Digital: The Hallmark Photographic Collection," chronicles the history of photography in the United States from the mid-1800s to the present. The exhibit, which includes more than 100 vintage photographs, many quite rare, was organized by Keith F. Davis, a fine-arts program director at Hallmark Cards Inc. He selected them from the company's collection, considered to be one of the major holdings of its kind in the world.
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