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Photography

ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2009 | By Victoria Donohoe FOR THE INQUIRER
There's a lot to see in a show on three floors at the Plastic Club by George Krause, a photographer who has remained true to his gifts. It's a pleasure to welcome this exhibit's more than 80 works, from the late 1950s to today, by a Philadelphia native now living in Wimberley, Texas. Krause founded the University of Houston's photo program in 1975 after being invited to teach there by ex-Philadelphian George Bunker. A magnet for awards, Krause has had two Guggenheim Fellowships and three National Endowment grants, and he was the first photographer to receive a Prix de Rome fellowship, a Fulbright grant, and Texas Artist of the Year honor.
NEWS
September 11, 2009 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Frank Burd gets nervous in large crowds, and fears going into Center City alone. His youngest child just left for college, and some days, he feels isolated and overwhelmed. Burd, widely known as a victim of student violence, rarely ventures out of his house without a camera. And pictures, always central to his life, have taken on a new significance. "Photographs have served as my third hand," Burd said. "I shoot because it feels good. I'm doing this for me. " Tonight, an exhibit of his work opens at the University of the Arts.
LIVING
August 19, 2009 | By Jen A. Miller FOR THE INQUIRER
Chris Sembrot saw the writing on the wall. He had worked as an art buyer at Red Tettemer for about five years, pricing and buying illustrations and photography for the Philadelphia-based advertising agency. But the company lost a few clients, and about a dozen coworkers had already been laid off. "It was time to go," says Sembrot, 29. So when the ax fell in March, he was ready for the next stage of his professional life: funemployment. Yes, you read that right. The catchword describes what everyone says to do (but never does)
NEWS
June 26, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Helen Diner Hayes Dalton, 83, former president of the Professional Photographers' Association of Pennsylvania, died of stomach cancer Sunday at her Drexel Hill home. Born in Scranton, Mrs. Dalton graduated in 1944 from Scranton Central High School and in the 1960s from the Antonelli Institute of Art and Photography, then in Philadelphia. Mrs. Dalton opened a photography studio, Helen Hayes & Associates, in her home on Huey Avenue in Drexel Hill in 1968, then ran it on Ferne Boulevard from 1981 until she retired in 2003, said her daughter, Kathleen Hayes Mitzner.
LIVING
June 26, 2009 | By Paul Jablow FOR THE INQUIRER
It's not that the art of glassblowing doesn't get any respect. It's just that it never hurts to remind people that even if it's a bowl or an ashtray, it's still art. This explains why Emily Kimelman Gilvey and her husband, Sean, had planned to turn their Hudson Beach Glass studio into a small gallery ever since it opened in October. They wanted to show paintings and photography as well as exhibit their own line of glassware and others. "We're a small, family business that's making something," said Gilvey, a photographer turned mystery writer.
NEWS
April 22, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Is that the sonorous baritone of Mufasa, a.k.a. James Earl Jones, waxing poetic about "the circle of life"? What's this - Lion King III? No, it's Earth, the inaugural release from Disney's Disneynature division, a wide-screen wildlife documentary in which the cycles of birth and death, migrations and seasons, are captured in stunning - absolutely stunning - ways. Baby seals glowing in the light of dusk, a dense flock of cranes scudding across the sky, a lynx in a conifer forest, ducklings tumbling from a tree, fluttering their stubby wings, and yes, a pride of lions prowling around - isn't the world a magical place?
NEWS
March 19, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rosalyn Cutler Handel, 76, of Elkins Park, a photographer and supporter of Reconstructionist Rabbinical College, died of pancreatic cancer last Thursday at Abington Memorial Hospital. Mrs. Handel graduated from Olney High School and then, at 17, married George Handel, who was 22. They raised three children. In her late 30s, Mrs. Handel took courses at the Women's Institute of Awareness at the YMHA on South Broad Street. The courses empowered her to become involved in causes she believed in, said her daughter, Donna.
NEWS
September 23, 2008 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
In its first curatorial hire since the death of longtime director Anne d'Harnoncourt, the Philadelphia Museum of Art has named Peter D. Barberie curator of photographs. Although he comes from a post as lecturer at Princeton University, Barberie, 37, is something of an Art Museum insider. He worked as a curatorial fellow there starting in 2003 just after the museum acquired the Julien Levy collection, cataloging its 2,500 photographs. He organized the exhibition "Looking at Atget" in 2005 and co-organized "Dreaming in Black and White: Photography at the Julien Levy Gallery" in 2006.
NEWS
September 22, 2008 | By David R. Adler FOR THE INQUIRER
Keith Jarrett's nettlesome reputation precedes him. He forbids photography during shows. He is not above losing his temper at audiences who, as he puts it, "get in the way of their own experience. " This has been part of the Jarrett package since the '70s, and it's controversial. Since he's one of the finest jazz pianists alive, however, you're able to wave away the misgivings with a few brilliantly placed chords. On Friday at the Kimmel Center, with Gary Peacock on bass and Jack DeJohnette on drums, Jarrett delved right into a luminous, out-of-tempo prelude, enfolding voices within voices.
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