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NEWS
February 5, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fresh from graduating summa cum laude at the Rhode Island School of Design in 1978, Judith Taylor lived what her brother, John, called a "hardscrabble" life in the East Village of Manhattan. She worked for prominent photographers, he said, but as "nothing more than a lab assistant, doing touch-ups from negatives. " Yet, because she was living in the midst of all sorts of artistic experimentations, he said, "It was a good time to be broke. " Her Manhattan adventure ended when her apartment was broken into, he said, but that didn't end her own artistic experimentations.
LIVING
January 13, 2010 | By Dawn Fallik FOR THE INQUIRER
Reality meets interpretation in photos of dancers, wildlife, and wild people. www.garyreedphotomedia.comcq. Gary Reed still has the camera his uncle got him when he was about 10 years old. It was a cheap point-and-shoot, but 40 years later, it still works. "I pulled it out one day and did a series at Fairmount Park," he says. "The problem is finding film for it nowadays. " Reed isn't afraid to hang onto old technology, but he's also not fearful of trying out the new. A Mac computer technician at McMobile in Drexel Hill during the day, he spends an additional 40 to 50 hours a week prowling the city streets, the parks, the creeks, looking for that perfect shot.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2009 | By Frank Wilson FOR THE INQUIRER
With all the talk these days about the demise of the book, it is useful to remember that not all books are created equal. An eminently disposable paperback of a Dan Brown thriller picked up at the airport is one thing, the catalogue raisonn? of a master artist's work issued by a major museum quite another. Amazon's Kindle is a wonderfully convenient device, and it may be possible, in the not so distant future, to download onto it an entire art book in all its glorious shades of color.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2009 | By Victoria Donohoe FOR THE INQUIRER
There's a lot to see in a show on three floors at the Plastic Club by George Krause, a photographer who has remained true to his gifts. It's a pleasure to welcome this exhibit's more than 80 works, from the late 1950s to today, by a Philadelphia native now living in Wimberley, Texas. Krause founded the University of Houston's photo program in 1975 after being invited to teach there by ex-Philadelphian George Bunker. A magnet for awards, Krause has had two Guggenheim Fellowships and three National Endowment grants, and he was the first photographer to receive a Prix de Rome fellowship, a Fulbright grant, and Texas Artist of the Year honor.
NEWS
September 11, 2009 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Frank Burd gets nervous in large crowds, and fears going into Center City alone. His youngest child just left for college, and some days, he feels isolated and overwhelmed. Burd, widely known as a victim of student violence, rarely ventures out of his house without a camera. And pictures, always central to his life, have taken on a new significance. "Photographs have served as my third hand," Burd said. "I shoot because it feels good. I'm doing this for me. " Tonight, an exhibit of his work opens at the University of the Arts.
LIVING
August 19, 2009 | By Jen A. Miller FOR THE INQUIRER
Chris Sembrot saw the writing on the wall. He had worked as an art buyer at Red Tettemer for about five years, pricing and buying illustrations and photography for the Philadelphia-based advertising agency. But the company lost a few clients, and about a dozen coworkers had already been laid off. "It was time to go," says Sembrot, 29. So when the ax fell in March, he was ready for the next stage of his professional life: funemployment. Yes, you read that right. The catchword describes what everyone says to do (but never does)
NEWS
June 26, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Helen Diner Hayes Dalton, 83, former president of the Professional Photographers' Association of Pennsylvania, died of stomach cancer Sunday at her Drexel Hill home. Born in Scranton, Mrs. Dalton graduated in 1944 from Scranton Central High School and in the 1960s from the Antonelli Institute of Art and Photography, then in Philadelphia. Mrs. Dalton opened a photography studio, Helen Hayes & Associates, in her home on Huey Avenue in Drexel Hill in 1968, then ran it on Ferne Boulevard from 1981 until she retired in 2003, said her daughter, Kathleen Hayes Mitzner.
LIVING
June 26, 2009 | By Paul Jablow FOR THE INQUIRER
It's not that the art of glassblowing doesn't get any respect. It's just that it never hurts to remind people that even if it's a bowl or an ashtray, it's still art. This explains why Emily Kimelman Gilvey and her husband, Sean, had planned to turn their Hudson Beach Glass studio into a small gallery ever since it opened in October. They wanted to show paintings and photography as well as exhibit their own line of glassware and others. "We're a small, family business that's making something," said Gilvey, a photographer turned mystery writer.
NEWS
April 22, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Is that the sonorous baritone of Mufasa, a.k.a. James Earl Jones, waxing poetic about "the circle of life"? What's this - Lion King III? No, it's Earth, the inaugural release from Disney's Disneynature division, a wide-screen wildlife documentary in which the cycles of birth and death, migrations and seasons, are captured in stunning - absolutely stunning - ways. Baby seals glowing in the light of dusk, a dense flock of cranes scudding across the sky, a lynx in a conifer forest, ducklings tumbling from a tree, fluttering their stubby wings, and yes, a pride of lions prowling around - isn't the world a magical place?
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