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NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Darran Simon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four weeks ago, photos surfaced depicting some state troopers arrayed behind a stash of drugs and weapons, apparently seized in Camden, with one of them holding aloft a Puerto Rican flag. At the time, Latino activists decried the images as disrespectful, and the state police opened an investigation. On Tuesday, Camden City Council weighed in on the issue. Councilman Luis Lopez, who is Puerto Rican, introduced a resolution, which passed unanimously, encouraging a thorough inquiry, which "will go a long way in helping allay community concerns.
NEWS
November 27, 1987 | By RON AVERY, Daily News Staff Writer
It started at 7 p.m. as "the Negro swimmers were quitting the pool on schedule and the white swimmers were going in. " Some whites dunked a 14-year-old black into the public pool at 26th and Master streets and that started the North Philadelphia race riots of July 1941. It took 300 policemen to quiet things down. It's all there for anyone to read in the envelope marked "Riots: Race. Philadelphia, Prior to 1949. " A short walk away, in the file marked "Philadelphia: Organ Grinders" is a series of 8-X-10 glossy photos of Antonio Campanoro of S. 7th Street and his monkey at a "dental operation to make him (the monkey)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1990 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Jazz Columnist
In 1938, fresh out of Lehigh University with a degree in economics, young Bill Gottlieb snared a job in the ad department of the Washington Post. "In order to keep my hand in at writing, and to spread the gospel of jazz," a much older Bill Gottlieb was reminiscing the other day, he began to submit a weekly jazz column to the Post's Sunday editions. For the first few weeks, they assigned a staff photographer to go along on his late-night/early-morning rounds of the places where jazz was played in the D.C. area.
NEWS
November 24, 1991 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
In their 60 pictures on view at Haverford College, Venetian photographers Carlo Jacobi and Orestre Bertani use working methods that make other photographers look superficial by comparison. Their pictures rely on the witnesslike ability of the camera. They contain exquisitely rendered documentary detail. Jacobi and Bertani give constant attention to information and the use of straightforward, familiar forms and conventions as well as to composition that includes human figures going about their daily rounds.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | By Matt Sedensky, Associated Press
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - When he was shot, Trayvon Martin was not the baby-faced boy in the photo that has been on front pages across the country. And George Zimmerman wasn't the beefy-looking figure in the widely published mugshot. Both photos are a few years old and no longer entirely accurate. Yet they may have helped shape initial public perceptions of the deadly shooting. "When you have such a lopsided visual comparison, it just stands to reason that people would rush to judgment," said Kenny Irby, who teaches visual journalism at the Poynter Institute, a journalism think tank in St. Petersburg, Fla. The most widely seen picture of Martin, released by his family and evidently taken a few years ago, shows a smiling, round-cheeked youngster in a red T-shirt.
NEWS
November 29, 2001 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Inspired by the events of Sept. 11, students at Friendship Elementary School in the Coatesville Area School District are capturing on film slices of American life that make them proud. "Proud to be American" is a school project that has photos lining hallways. The children were given cameras donated to the school by teachers and parents to take pictures of everyday events depicting why the students are grateful to be an American. One photo was a food-laden breakfast table with the caption: "I can eat a big breakfast every day. Some kids can't.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1986 | By SANDY SORLIEN, Special to the Daily News
Prowling the back alleys of the city in search of photo galleries (which is getting harder and harder with all the trash piling up), I fail to find any new ones. But I have come across something Philadelphia has lots of: restaurants. True, but irrelevant, you say? Wrong, for restaurants happen to be a great source of wall space. And a lot of them fill it with photography. We photophiles would love to think that the city's restaurateurs are grand proponents of the photographic medium, taking up the slack where the galleries often fail us. But the art shows that hang in restaurants are little more than afterthoughts to the owners, proud as they may be of them.
SPORTS
November 18, 1993 | by Ted Taylor, Special to the Daily News
Marc Okkonen, the author who gave us the definitive book on "Baseball Uniforms of the 20th Century" last year, is back with a Christmas gift idea for baseball fans of more recent vintage. His new book is "Baseball Memories, 1950-59, An Illustrated Scrapbook of Baseball's Fabulous 50s. " And "scrapbook" is the perfect description for Okkonen's latest work because he uses bits and scraps from countless publications and other sources to provide us with a photograph of virtually every player who saw any action at all in the majors during the 1950s.
NEWS
January 19, 2003 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Affectionate portrait photographs of friends, loved ones, neighbors and fellow artists taken over a recent two-year period by Brian H. Peterson fill gallery walls at Widener University. Well known as the senior curator at the James A. Michener Art Museum in Doylestown, this Lower Gwynedd resident is also a prolific photographer who has had more than 25 one-man photo exhibits since 1980. If his Widener show provides its own distinctive vantage on this artist's portraits, a subject he has not exhibited before, it also represents a coming full circle of sorts for Peterson's work as a whole, as some of his earlier and quite familiar nature and landscape themes are included here.
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