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Phyllis Hyman

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1996 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Phyllis Hyman's I Refuse to Be Lonely, the most personal and powerful album of the rhythm-and-blues diva's career, is an indisputable hit. Released in November, the album reached No. 67 on the Billboard Hot 200 and has sold 150,000 copies. Sadly, Hyman isn't around to enjoy her success: In June, six days shy of 46, the sultry vocalist committed suicide with an overdose of sleeping pills in her Manhattan apartment. Yesterday, the Philadelphia Music Alliance announced that Hyman will be inducted into the Philadelphia Music Walk of Fame on May 9. The honor is at least some measure of respect for the artist, who was slighted by the American Music Awards last week.
NEWS
August 21, 1998 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
The Phyllis Hyman recording that was released right after she killed herself June 30, 1995, was filled with anguish, hurt and pain. Some say it reflected her mind-set. Titled "I Refuse to be Lonely," the disc contained some affirmations of love, but they were overwhelmed by sad songs, tunes of dark desperation and self-doubt. Then there was her appearance on the CD's jacket cover. Overly thick eyeliner circled her big, beautiful eyes. I guess she was trying to give a semblance of sultriness, looking at us from under that big hat. But she failed, looking more empty than sexy.
NEWS
October 8, 1987 | By RENEE V. LUCAS, Daily News Staff Writer
Although born in Philadelphia, R&B songstress Phyllis Hyman grew up in Pittsburgh. In 1971, she turned professional, forming a group called the New Direction. The group went on a six-month American tour, but disbanded afterward. On her own, Hyman moved to Miami and sang on the club circut for a few years. In 1975, she took her act to Rust Brown's club on West 96th Street in New York. As a result of her residency there, Jon Lucien, a West Indian singer whose music was colored by jazz, asked her to appear on his "Premonitions" album.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
Phyllis Hyman kicked off her shoes as soon as she hit the stage at the Theater of Living Arts last night. That still wasn't ample forewarning of what was to come. Hyman, playing to a nearly packed house in her first of eight shows that run through Sunday at the 400-seat South Street theater, put all she had into her two sets, which lasted more than an hour each. She sang pop, jazz and the blues. She sang classics as well as new songs. And she sang with breathy vulnerability and with resonanting power.
NEWS
November 18, 1991 | By Kevin L. Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Whatever you may think of Phyllis Hyman, be assured that the lady herself knows where she stands. Hyman is statuesque, beautiful, and exudes the attitude of someone who insists on a certain kind of treatment. She is, in a word, a diva. On Saturday, Hyman showed a polished presence and a jazz-infused soul style to the audience at the earlier of two shows at the Valley Forge Music Fair. She said she was glad to be singing at home, and onstage was down-to-earth, often irreverent.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1987 | By RENEE V. LUCAS, Daily News Staff Writer
Although born in Philadelphia, R&B songstress Phyllis Hyman grew up in Pittsburgh. In 1971, she turned professional, forming a group called the New Direction. The group went on a six-month American tour, but disbanded afterward. On her own, Hyman moved to Miami and sang on the club circut for a few years. In 1975, she took her act to Rust Brown's club on West 96th Street in New York. As a result of her residency there, Jon Lucien, a West Indian singer whose music was colored by jazz, asked her to appear on his "Premonitions" album.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1989 | By Tom Di Nardo, Special to the Daily News
Phyllis Hyman rewarded her hometown audience last night with a marathon two hours-plus of songs, promising 20 but throwing in a few extras as well. Ending just at 11, the concert alternated some older songs from the successful "Living All Alone" record with a tryout preview of six tunes from her upcoming album, "In the Prime of My Life. " It's the first long-run booking (running through Sunday) at the Theatre of Living Arts, 334 South St., which looks much the same as it did in its movie- buff heyday: dark blue side walls and exposed light-bar pipes at stage ceiling.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1989 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Staff Writer
By her own description, Phyllis Hyman is "a girl of Amazonian proportions. " She is 6-feet, 1/2-inch tall (at least 6-3 in heels). Weight, censored. "I'm a big girl," she says, turning a negative fillip in the conversation into a positive. "I think I'm the biggest, the tallest and - weightwise - the healthiest singer today. Susan Anton? She can't be anywhere near my size and age; she's bone-thin. I should be more careful of what I eat. I carry a few more pounds than I ought to. But as you and I and the butcher know, nobody wants a bone but a dog. " Phyllis Hyman, the ageless ("30-something")
NEWS
July 12, 1995 | By Suzanne Sataline, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They had already gone inside, the producers and radio personalities and the friends from New York in their sequins and slits. Standing outside was everybody else. The people Phyllis Hyman sang to. Those men and women, hundreds of them, lined up outside of the Bright Hope Baptist Church in North Philadelphia in their best Sunday clothes, their shining shoes, snaking around the corner, waiting to see off their idol. Many would be turned away, with only a program to remember her by. Yet none chose words of anger or sadness or regret for the woman who took her life, but who will always speak in the smoky tongues of jazz and R&B. "We loved her, the sound of her," said Juanita Jones of West Philadelphia, at the tail end of the line.
NEWS
July 2, 1995 | By Carolyn Acker, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Reid Kanaley and the Associated Press contributed to this article
Philadelphia-born songstress Phyllis Hyman had just completed a new album, writing many of the songs herself, when she apparently took her own life Friday in New York. "She was in a growth stage," said record producer Kenny Gamble. "I mean, she was writing and producing, so I thought that was very good for her. " Philadelphia International Records will release Ms. Hyman's still-untitled album within 60 days, said Gamble, who co-owns the label with Leon Huff. A jazz and R&B recording and performing artist, Ms. Hyman also starred in the Broadway musical Sophisticated Ladies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2012
THERE WAS the time in 2008 Tyler Perry showed up in the lobby of the WDAS radio station in Bala Cynwyd asking to see on-air host Patty Jackson. She'd met him years earlier when he was still producing stage plays and only dreaming of getting into the Hollywood scene. But Jackson hadn't seen him in ages. When Jackson walked out into the lobby, Perry greeted her and explained, "I had to come by and see you because you were there for me from the beginning. You talked with me when nobody else would talk with me. " Her stunned reaction: "You hang with Oprah and Gayle, and you remember me ?"
NEWS
August 21, 1998 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
The Phyllis Hyman recording that was released right after she killed herself June 30, 1995, was filled with anguish, hurt and pain. Some say it reflected her mind-set. Titled "I Refuse to be Lonely," the disc contained some affirmations of love, but they were overwhelmed by sad songs, tunes of dark desperation and self-doubt. Then there was her appearance on the CD's jacket cover. Overly thick eyeliner circled her big, beautiful eyes. I guess she was trying to give a semblance of sultriness, looking at us from under that big hat. But she failed, looking more empty than sexy.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1996 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As is the case with so many musicians and singers, vocalist Barbara Walker's earliest days in the business found her performing in some rather tough locations - especially for a 15-year-old girl. It was OK, though, since Walker's father was on hand to look out for her. Her debut was at 65th Street and Haverford Avenue. Walker doesn't recall the name of the West Philadelphia club where she appeared with her father, organist Bill Walker. But she does remember that the performance did not come off without some resistance from her mother.
LIVING
May 9, 1996 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I've got a right to take care of myself I realize that I come first, before anybody else . . . There are some things I can choose And baby I refuse to be lonely. -"I Refuse to Be Lonely," by Phyllis Hyman If Phyllis Hyman had not put an end to her life by taking an overdose of sleeping pills in her Manhattan apartment June 30, her posthumously released album, I Refuse to Be Lonely, would play like one woman's brave, torturous pullback from the brink. The song titles say it all: "I Refuse to Be Lonely.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1996 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Phyllis Hyman's I Refuse to Be Lonely, the most personal and powerful album of the rhythm-and-blues diva's career, is an indisputable hit. Released in November, the album reached No. 67 on the Billboard Hot 200 and has sold 150,000 copies. Sadly, Hyman isn't around to enjoy her success: In June, six days shy of 46, the sultry vocalist committed suicide with an overdose of sleeping pills in her Manhattan apartment. Yesterday, the Philadelphia Music Alliance announced that Hyman will be inducted into the Philadelphia Music Walk of Fame on May 9. The honor is at least some measure of respect for the artist, who was slighted by the American Music Awards last week.
NEWS
July 12, 1995 | By Suzanne Sataline, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They had already gone inside, the producers and radio personalities and the friends from New York in their sequins and slits. Standing outside was everybody else. The people Phyllis Hyman sang to. Those men and women, hundreds of them, lined up outside of the Bright Hope Baptist Church in North Philadelphia in their best Sunday clothes, their shining shoes, snaking around the corner, waiting to see off their idol. Many would be turned away, with only a program to remember her by. Yet none chose words of anger or sadness or regret for the woman who took her life, but who will always speak in the smoky tongues of jazz and R&B. "We loved her, the sound of her," said Juanita Jones of West Philadelphia, at the tail end of the line.
NEWS
July 12, 1995 | GEORGE REYNOLDS/ DAILY NEWS
Sakeema Ali Hyman, sister of the late Phyllis Hyman, is comforted by her daughter Anita Brown at memorial services held for the late jazz and rhythm- and-blues singer. Services were held at Bright Hope Baptist Church, 12th Street and Cecil B. Moore Avenue yesterday. Known for her unique vocal stylings, the troubled singer committed suicide on June 30.
NEWS
July 7, 1995 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer
In death Phyllis Hyman is not "washed up. " She's a superstar. Hundreds of her fans, dressed in black, crushed into the lobby at St. Peter's Jazz Community Church in New York City last night in a vain attempt to catch a glimpse of her memorial service. They peered over balconies, stood on the streets alongside stretch limousines. They clutched autographed pictures and mementos of the late jazz and rhythm-and-blues singer. The fame that had been eluding the powerful alto singer for so many years was finally hers again, but it was too late.
NEWS
July 2, 1995 | By Carolyn Acker, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Reid Kanaley and the Associated Press contributed to this article
Philadelphia-born songstress Phyllis Hyman had just completed a new album, writing many of the songs herself, when she apparently took her own life Friday in New York. "She was in a growth stage," said record producer Kenny Gamble. "I mean, she was writing and producing, so I thought that was very good for her. " Philadelphia International Records will release Ms. Hyman's still-untitled album within 60 days, said Gamble, who co-owns the label with Leon Huff. A jazz and R&B recording and performing artist, Ms. Hyman also starred in the Broadway musical Sophisticated Ladies.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1994 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Local favorites Rachelle Ferrell and Phyllis Hyman are two of the performers headlining the Dell East this summer. The city's Department of Recreation has released the schedule for its 1994 "Essence of Entertainment" series of concerts and special events. There will be shows scheduled on 20 days between June 28 and August 26, events that will provide the usual mix of gospel, R&B, and jazz concerts, ethnic festivals and other activities. While the number of events at the open-air theater in Fairmount Park has declined in past years, this year's schedule offers two more events than last year's.
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