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FOOD
March 4, 2016
Makes 7 servings, or 21 cigars For the dip: 1 cup plain low-fat Greek-style yogurt 2 tablespoons low-fat milk 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 6 mint leaves, stacked, rolled, cut into thin ribbons (chiffonade) 1 tablespoon ground sumac 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt Pomegranate molasses, for drizzling For the cigars: 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 medium onion, finely chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 3/4 teaspoon ground coriander 1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg 1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper 1 pound ground lamb 1 tablespoon tomato paste 11/2 tablespoons pomegranate molasses 3 tablespoons pine nuts 2 tablespoons finely chopped flat-leaf parsley or cilantro Peanut or canola oil, for frying 7 sheets phyllo dough (14 by 18 inches)
FOOD
April 25, 1993 | By Faye Levy, FOR THE INQUIRER
When I lived in Israel, I became acquainted with the delectable pastries called bourekas. These are made of phyllo dough with a tasty filling. Known in Turkey as beureks and in Greece as bourekia, these savory turnovers could be considered the empanadas of the Eastern Mediterranean area. In that part of the world, bourekas are a popular snack. You can buy them from bakeries, in cafes and in pizzeria-like restaurants that offer bourekas instead of pizza. Cheese, spinach and potato are the traditional fillings, but you can also find these flaky pastries enclosing beef, mushrooms or eggplant, or even a pizza-like filling of tomato and Parmesan cheese.
FOOD
April 5, 1987 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
"What do you do with that?" asked the checker, turning the little cardboard box of frozen phyllo this way and that before subjecting it to the registering computer's electronic gaze. "What can't you do?" might be an easier question to answer. Packaged phyllo, now available at your local supermarket after years of being a gourmet-store item, is the most versatile of convenience doughs, capable of wrapping anything but liquid - from spinach, cheese and chili to chicken breasts, apples and almonds - in a flaky, buttery, ultra-light crust that is crispness incarnate.
FOOD
September 12, 1993 | By Rena Coyle, FOR THE INQUIRER
When the children are doing the cooking, the recipes should be fun with a slight twist on a recognizable entree. Crispy Pizza, for example, makes a twist on regular Italian pizza but requires no bready crust. Instead, it uses crisp phyllo dough, layered into a crust and topped with a combination of vegetables and cheese. There are many steps for your young child, with adult supervision, to prepare, but it's the preteen and teenager who will have the most fun preparing this pizza.
FOOD
March 6, 1996 | By Andrew Schloss, FOR THE INQUIRER
What makes strudel so good? It's not just the countless sheets of pastry, blistered and crackling like a folio of fallen leaves. It's not just the ooze of the filling, bubbling with fruit or melted cheese. It's not just the butter impregnated into every morsel that makes strudel irresistible. It's all of it. Buttery, crumbly, perfumed and moist. Strudel is an extravagance of contrasts, and one of the best gifts you can offer your mouth, or your guests. But let's face it, whether you prepare your strudel dough from scratch, or use frozen phyllo, strudel-making is a project.
FOOD
March 5, 1995 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
Imagine chunks of chicken and vegetables in a smooth, herb sauce. Then, add to that vision, a golden, flaky crust. It's the all-time great: chicken pot pie. Don't look to your freezer case for the perfect pot pie. What you'll get there is about as soggy as a rainy day. This is one dinner you'll have to make to appreciate. The traditional recipe, with a pastry crust and filling, is more time- consuming and requires more effort than many cooks can afford on weeknights, so I created a delicious quick version using phyllo dough.
FOOD
November 8, 1987 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Food Writer
If you've ever wondered why takeout restaurants get big prices for tiny appetizers, here's an answer: Most finger foods are labor-intensive, requiring a long time and considerable expertise to prepare. So what do you do when you have little money and only minutes to prepare holiday party food? You could serve chips or crudites and a dip, crackers and cheese, or a dozen other cliches. Or you could dazzle your guests with Spicy Sausage Bites and Garlic Olives, both of which take more time to describe than they do to fix. Each Sausage Bite is a triangular package of buttered layers of phyllo dough around a filling of some well-seasoned sausage that you've cooked in advance or bought precooked.
FOOD
February 6, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
Kreatopitta, a Greek dish traditionally made with ground lamb or beef, can be prepared with tempeh instead and still be delicious. This soyfood gives the dish a chewy meatlike texture and a distinctive nutty flavor. Tempeh (pronounced tem-pay) is a fermented food made from the whole soybean and is richer in flavor and nutrients than tofu. Precooking is necessary in order to tenderize tempeh, and it should be steamed before proceeding with the recipe. Simply cube the tempeh and place in a steamer over boiling water and steam for 15 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013
MANAKEESH CAFE ROSE BAKLAVA 7 phyllo dough sheets 200 grams ground cashew 1/2 cup clarified butter, melted 1 cup sugar 1/2 cup water Capful of lemon juice 2 drops rose water Pinch of ground pistachio, for garnish (optional) Stack the dough sheets and cut into 5-by-10-inch rectangles, then into 2.5-inch squares. For the syrup: In a saucepan, combine sugar and water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and stir, 3 to 5 minutes, until sugar is completely dissolved.
NEWS
March 27, 2012
4-6 tablespoons melted butter 7 sheets of phyllo 3 green garlic shoots,? (substitute 4 scallions or small? bunch of chives and 2 cloves of? garlic) 8 ounces creamy fresh goat? cheese, at room temperature 1 egg 2-3 tablespoons of olive oil 1 large bunch greens (approx.? 1 pound) such as Swiss chard, ? kale, or spinach, washed and? trimmed Salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste 1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Melt the butter in a small saucepan.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
May 27, 2016
Makes 6 to 8 servings 8 sheets phyllo dough, thawed if frozen 1/2 cup butter, melted 8 to 10 ounces fresh goat cheese or sheep milk feta Fresh ground black pepper 2 to 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 to 2 fresh garlic stalks, well cleaned, thinly sliced (Garlic scapes work well or sub 3 cloves garlic, peeled, sliced thin 4 to 6 cups cleaned, stemmed, greens such as spinach, kale, mustard, arugula, or broccoli rabe ...
FOOD
March 4, 2016
Makes 7 servings, or 21 cigars For the dip: 1 cup plain low-fat Greek-style yogurt 2 tablespoons low-fat milk 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 6 mint leaves, stacked, rolled, cut into thin ribbons (chiffonade) 1 tablespoon ground sumac 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt Pomegranate molasses, for drizzling For the cigars: 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 medium onion, finely chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 3/4 teaspoon ground coriander 1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg 1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper 1 pound ground lamb 1 tablespoon tomato paste 11/2 tablespoons pomegranate molasses 3 tablespoons pine nuts 2 tablespoons finely chopped flat-leaf parsley or cilantro Peanut or canola oil, for frying 7 sheets phyllo dough (14 by 18 inches)
NEWS
October 15, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Aside from food, religion, philosophy, government, familial love, education, and a few million other things, the Greeks have offered the world very little. That's the slyly delivered take on his culture offered by George Horiates, an organizer of the annual Greek Agora Festival in Cherry Hill. A personal-injury attorney in Pennsauken, Horiates, 46, sat in a blue-and-white tent outside St. Thomas Greek Orthodox Church on Sunday, trying to explain Greek-ness to an outsider. "This culture at its base involves food," said Horiates, who lives in Moorestown.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013
MANAKEESH CAFE ROSE BAKLAVA 7 phyllo dough sheets 200 grams ground cashew 1/2 cup clarified butter, melted 1 cup sugar 1/2 cup water Capful of lemon juice 2 drops rose water Pinch of ground pistachio, for garnish (optional) Stack the dough sheets and cut into 5-by-10-inch rectangles, then into 2.5-inch squares. For the syrup: In a saucepan, combine sugar and water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and stir, 3 to 5 minutes, until sugar is completely dissolved.
FOOD
November 15, 2012 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Thanksgiving conjures up a centerpiece of a perfectly browned turkey on a platter with a multitude of side dishes. But if your family is like many, there will be folks around your table who forgo meat or gluten or animal products of all sorts. Luckily, there is a bounty of local vegetables, herbs, grains, nuts, and seeds to be thankful for. Indeed, the staples of several American Indian tribes - North America's original locavores - can inform our Thanksgiving repertoire. Wild rice, greens, cranberries and dried fruits, pecans and squash can be combined in modern ways and celebrate this historical legacy.
NEWS
March 27, 2012
4-6 tablespoons melted butter 7 sheets of phyllo 3 green garlic shoots,? (substitute 4 scallions or small? bunch of chives and 2 cloves of? garlic) 8 ounces creamy fresh goat? cheese, at room temperature 1 egg 2-3 tablespoons of olive oil 1 large bunch greens (approx.? 1 pound) such as Swiss chard, ? kale, or spinach, washed and? trimmed Salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste 1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Melt the butter in a small saucepan.
NEWS
April 6, 2003 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Disappointment might be in store for patrons of Little Marakesh, one of a handful of area restaurants that serve authentic Moroccan food. If you have no sense of fun or can't suspend disbelief - to name two requirements of dramatic productions - you might not appreciate the Friday and Saturday night special billed as the Moroccan "feast. " It's a fixed meal that requires you to put aside your usual expectations about service and food. Those might be two major categories in dining, but at this family-owned restaurant, they are treated almost as secondary considerations.
FOOD
September 10, 2000 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
It's best not to blink when you drive down Sumneytown Pike. The town of Mainland will be gone before you even knew it had arrived. Perched amid the green hills and picturesque cemeteries of Lower Salford Township in outer Montgomery County, the Mainland Inn sits on 13 manicured acres of field, where owner Donald Jonas can be found some days practicing his golf swing between lunch and dinner. It's pretty land but useless floodplain, really, the ever-modest Jonas readily admits, trying to temper the neatly mowed grandeur, eager at every turn to put the qualities of his lovely restaurant in the proper perspective.
NEWS
May 21, 2000 | By John V.R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's no need for Trumpets to toot its own horn, for I'll happily do it instead. The Kennett Square restaurant with lovely Victorian setting opened six weeks ago in what used to be Samantha's Cafe, offering splendid contemporary cuisine paired with the appropriate wines. The entire restaurant is non-smoking, even the attractive bar, which may mean that the beautiful decor will remain pristine for as long as I hope the restaurant survives. The menu is uncommonly appealing and dishes are prepared with considerable accomplishment.
FOOD
February 20, 2000 | By Lucy Barajikian, FOR THE INQUIRER
It could happen. Onion dip, cheese balls and baked Brie might just go the way of the dodo bird. It could happen, that is, once cooks take a look at the newly published Hors d'oeuvres (OK Publishing Inc., $19.95) by chef Eric Treuille and caterer Victoria Blashford-Snell, both of London. A second glance should send cooks scurrying for the cumin and coriander, shrimp and chicken wings, skewers, phyllo and tortillas - whatever's on hand to begin the magic. The only remaining problem: Which recipe to go for first?
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