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Physical Therapy

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NEWS
February 3, 1992 | By Jeremy Treatman, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER Inquirer correspondent Joe Santoliquito contributed to this article
The new color in Jameel McClairen's life is orange. Orange, as in Syracuse Orange. St. James' 6-foot, 4-inch linebacker-to-be, an Inquirer all-area third-team selection on the defensive line, orally committed to Syracuse on a football scholarship Wednesday night, and he plans to return a signed letter of intent through the mail Wednesday, the first day of the signing period. McClairen said he would redshirt next season then vie for one of three linebacker spots that are expected to open before the 1993 season.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
Parents of children in need of pediatric physical therapy can now find such treatment at the Moss Rehab Outpatient Center at 9892 Bustleton Ave. Although only 600 square feet, the three-room center, complete with a brightly colored mural of Mickey Mouse & Co. taking a hot-air balloon ride, offers a variety of physical and occupational therapy services to youngsters 2 months old and older. The center treats disease-related ailments, birth defects and simple or complex injuries.
NEWS
November 26, 1987 | By Gary Miles, Inquirer Staff Writer
For some athletes, their senior year in high school sports brings college scholarships, great achievements and notoriety. For Richard DeMaria of Dresher, it brought only pain and agony. It was Sept. 11, a few days before the 1970 Upper Dublin High School football season was to start, and DeMaria had just been elected captain of the team. That afternoon, DeMaria broke his right leg in practice, fracturing the knee in several places. So, for the next 11 weeks, the former starting center for coach John Pavlick, now in his 18th year as head coach, lay immobilized in bed and watched as the recruiting letters he had received all during his junior year from Wake Forest and the University of Delaware stopped coming.
SPORTS
October 7, 1994 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
After a torturous summer of physical therapy and regular visits to a sports psychologist, Bobby Hurley, the Sacramento Kings point guard who was severely injured in a December traffic accident, reported to training camp yesterday. Hurley is trying to make a comeback from injuries that included five broken ribs, collapsed lungs, a severed windpipe, and a fractured shoulder blade. "I'm pretty anxious about starting camp. It's something I've been working toward for months," Hurley said.
NEWS
March 3, 1988 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's bad luck that brings them together in the hospital's physical therapy gym. Stroke. Amputation. Major surgery. Their bodies wear the limitations left behind by medical misfortune. There's Charles Garner, 74, retired machine operator and frequent jokester, looking dapper in his black trousers and suspenders as he does a slow-paced practice run with a cane. There's Alicia Todd, 33, insurance underwriter, stroke victim, serious and determined to get home to her children.
NEWS
October 22, 2008
Brian Forsyth is a lifelong Phillies fan who lives in Havertown The Phillies saved my life. Well, technically, a bicycle helmet saved my life. (Wear a helmet, everyone.) But the Phillies have helped heal the traumatic brain injury I suffered in a traffic accident in August 2007. The physical and emotional scars of that accident have required massive amounts of therapy. A lot of it has taken place at Citizens Bank Park. I attended the clinching 2007 season finale in a wheelchair, and I had to leave the game early due to overstimulation.
NEWS
September 10, 1998 | By L. Stuart Ditzen and Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Federal and city law enforcement officials announced two major health-care fraud prosecutions yesterday, one involving a physical therapy business that operated at five area fitness centers, the other involving a Philadelphia doctor who allegedly provided prescription drugs to addicts. In a four-count bill of charges, the U.S. Attorney's Office accused Eric C. Keck, 37, of Bryn Athyn of a $12 million fraud on private insurance companies from 1993 to this year through phony physical therapy billings.
NEWS
October 28, 2001 | By Will Van Sant INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In a Voorhees strip mall at the corner of Cooper and Kresson-Gibbsboro Roads, owners of Pet PT have been massaging injured dogs in heated pools and walking their wobbly legs on treadmills, bringing new life to aged and injured joints. The PT stands for physical therapy. The owners, two veterinarians and a human physical therapist now practicing on animals, estimate that they have put 50 dogs through therapy since opening the business in April. "I love this," said veterinarian Russell Howe-Smith as he was about to don a wet suit and wade with a Doberman into the facility's 7,000-gallon aqua-therapy pool.
NEWS
April 8, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you're considering surgery for back pain, a new study suggests you first should try physical therapy, which is both less risky and less costly. The University of Pittsburgh study found that surgery and physical therapy were equally helpful for lumbar spinal stenosis, a common condition in older people that makes walking painful. It is the latest of numerous studies to question whether Americans get too much back surgery. It also raises questions about financial incentives.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2015 | By Sheena Faherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
The newest building at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia will open its doors Monday, providing a state-of-the-art outpatient facility for the body and a roof garden for the soul. The 12-story Buerger Center for Advanced Pediatric Care, the most expensive building project in Children's history, will cost $425 million, with an additional $175 million needed for equipment. The glass-lined building, streaked with primary colors, sits on Civic Center Boulevard, across the street and just south of the main hospital.
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BUSINESS
July 28, 2015 | By Sheena Faherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
The newest building at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia will open its doors Monday, providing a state-of-the-art outpatient facility for the body and a roof garden for the soul. The 12-story Buerger Center for Advanced Pediatric Care, the most expensive building project in Children's history, will cost $425 million, with an additional $175 million needed for equipment. The glass-lined building, streaked with primary colors, sits on Civic Center Boulevard, across the street and just south of the main hospital.
NEWS
April 8, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you're considering surgery for back pain, a new study suggests you first should try physical therapy, which is both less risky and less costly. The University of Pittsburgh study found that surgery and physical therapy were equally helpful for lumbar spinal stenosis, a common condition in older people that makes walking painful. It is the latest of numerous studies to question whether Americans get too much back surgery. It also raises questions about financial incentives.
SPORTS
October 30, 2014 | By Kate Harman, For The Inquirer
Kaitlyn McFadden and Jules Blank were not accustomed to the feeling. McFadden and Blank, members of the Archbishop Ryan girls' soccer team, stood on the sideline as their teammates warmed up. They later stood in a line with the other Ragdolls and clapped as the starting lineups were announced over the loudspeaker, and they sat on the bench as the team played Catholic League opponents. McFadden, a senior defender, and Blank, a junior forward, sure weren't familiar with sitting back and watching, but over nine days in the middle of the season, they did just that.
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doctors at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children had been talking for quite a while about better coordinating medical care and the social-service help so many of their patients in North Philadelphia need. CEO Carolyn Jackson got behind the idea in January 2012 after a young stepfather shot four teens who were involved in a dispute with his children. One of the wounded teens drove with the other three to St. Christopher's. Three of the victims died. "All four of those boys had been cared for at St. Christopher's since birth," Jackson said.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2014
AWeber Email Marketing hired Sarah Thomas as director of customer solutions and Lynette Young as content marketing manager. Thomas was global support operations manager at Netflix in Santa Clara, Calif. and Young was founder and owner of Purple Stripe Productions. Jane Runey Knox was promoted to chief operating officer at Healthcare Administrative Partners , a Media-based medical data and technology company. Lydia Turner was hired as general manager of Ocean Prime Philadelphia , an American supper club.
SPORTS
August 21, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
AFTER A BREAKOUT junior season, Northeast High's Gladimir "The Destroyer" Paul has certainly capitalized, committing to the University of Virginia yesterday with several other schools still in pursuit. The 6-2, 210-pound defensive end garnered attention last season for his ability to disrupt and demolish opposing quarterbacks. "Last year, I really got my name out there with what I can do on the football field and this is just a dream come true, and I'm really happy and content right now," Paul said between practice sessions yesterday.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | Julie Shaw, DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER
JACQUELINE WONG doesn't live in poverty according to standard guidelines - her income puts her household at about twice the poverty level - but she is struggling to make ends meet. She was laid off twice by the School District of Philadelphia. Fortunately, she has an adjunct position teaching math for Community College of Philadelphia, where she makes $15,000 a year. But it is only part time. She also works a few hours each month as a community consultant with Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corp., for which she receives $5,000 a year.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not that he's an Olympic-caliber skier, but when Frank Osborne heard that downhill phenom Lindsey Vonn had crashed on a training run last month in Vail, Colo., he could relate. On Jan. 14, 1997, the Cheltenham native was 22, a recent graduate of St. Joseph's University, living in the Poconos, and tempting fate: the double black diamond run he had wiped out on the first time he tried it that day. So Osborne went down it again, at night, and, as he recalls, was out of control pretty much from the start: "I was just flying.
NEWS
December 1, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
GLENSIDE - Thanksgiving Day has passed, but don't tell that to Glenside's Ned Smith. His gratitude toward family and friends who have helped him since he suffered a stroke in 2011 is enough to last a lifetime. And the steps to recovery have blossomed into an unlikely musical project for the extended family. For years, Smith, 56, was in charge of scheduling the presses at the Schuylkill Printing Plant in Upper Merion, where The Inquirer and the Philadelphia Daily News are printed.
SPORTS
October 25, 2013 | By Rick O, Inquirer Columnist
Mike Class became Pennridge's all-time leading rusher earlier this season and is on the verge of joining the 5,000-yard club. It's a record-setting run that was nearly cut agonizingly short. In early May, while competing in the long jump in track and field, Class suffered a ruptured disc in his lower back. "When I went to my family doctor, I was actually told that I wouldn't be able to play football this season," the 5-foot-10, 185-pound senior captain said. "I was heartbroken.
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