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Physician Assistants

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NEWS
December 21, 2006
Physician assistants could serve our uninsured Gov. Rendell says he will be proposing a plan to care for one million uninsured Pennsylvanians that may include more utilization of nurse practitioners ("Rendell to push health coverage," Dec. 12). I salute the governor and his endeavor to increase access to care. There is another answer: further utilization of physician assistants. PAs are licensed health-care professionals who, like nurse practitioners, can handle more than 90 percent of what a physician can do. PAs can diagnose, treat, write prescriptions, and care for patients in a multitude of health-care settings.
NEWS
June 23, 2002 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Walter R. Bateman, an insurance executive who is active in the community, recently was named president of the North Penn United Way. Bateman of Solebury was elected to the position at the organization's recent annual meeting. Bateman had been a member of the organization's board since 1993 and served as chairman of the 1996 United Way campaign. "I'm honored to have been chosen to take on this expanded role with this outstanding organization," said Bateman, chief executive officer of Harleysville Insurance.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2010 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sue Shirato is a nurse. And a doctor. But probably not the kind of doctor you think, which makes her introduction to patients at the Jefferson Heart Institute more complicated. "I'm Dr. Shirato, but feel free to call me Sue," she tells patients. "I am Dr. Duffy's advanced-practice nurse. " Shirato, a nurse practitioner, just got her doctor of nursing practice degree at Thomas Jefferson University. Most nurse practitioners still have master's degrees, but nursing schools want the DNP to be the entry-level degree for advanced-practice nurses by 2015.
NEWS
August 2, 1995 | By Jennifer Wing, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Malawi toddlers on yellow hospital sheets, with an American doctor examining their polio-stricken joints. A beggar with small wood crutches. Another patient with a hand amputated. These are some of the images that orthopedic surgeon Robert Cram, 78, has seen - and expects to see again. He is preparing to return to Malawi to provide medical care and training on behalf of Rotary Club International. On Friday, Cram will make what he says will be the last of the six such trips he has made over the last 15 years.
NEWS
February 26, 1988 | By Steve Stecklow, Inquirer Staff Writer
An order by the Pennsylvania Department of Health that the James C. Giuffre Medical Center stop treating patients at its primary-care and surgical clinics could be lifted today, according to state and hospital officials. Hospital chairman Peter D. Carlino said yesterday that the hospital gave the Health Department documents Wednesday showing that medical doctors were now supervising the clinics full-time. Further information requested by the department was hand-delivered to a state official at the hospital yesterday, Carlino said.
NEWS
February 25, 1988 | By Steve Stecklow and Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writers
In its strongest disciplinary action ever against a hospital, the Pennsylvania Department of Health said yesterday that it had ordered the James C. Giuffre Medical Center to stop treating patients at its primary-care and surgical clinics. In its strongest disciplinary action ever against a hospital, the Pennsylvania Department of Health said yesterday that it had ordered the James C. Giuffre Medical Center to stop treating patients at its primary-care and The action follows state and federal investigators' discovery that patients in the outpatient primary-care clinic at the North Philadelphia hospital were being cared for by physician assistants and podiatry residents, not physicians.
NEWS
February 27, 1988 | By Steve Stecklow, Inquirer Staff Writer
The state Health Department yesterday permitted the James C. Giuffre Medical Center in North Philadelphia to resume treating patients at its primary-care and surgical clinics. "Giuffre has correctly responded to the Department of Health's complaints, so the order has been lifted," department spokesman Bill Shepherd said. "The clinics are open, functioning as well as they ever did," hospital chairman Peter D. Carlino said at a news conference at the hospital, at Eighth Street and Girard Avenue.
SPORTS
June 4, 1999 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Pat Felker and a handful of her 10 children will attend tonight's Hero Bowl at Sun Valley, hawking programs and selling tickets. "I feel it's the least we can do," Felker said. Tim and Eric Felker won't be there, although they wish they could join their mom and siblings to help promote a cause that paved the way for their education and careers as physician assistants. "We have to go to D.C. for a conference," said Eric, who works with Tim for a group that supplies physician assistants to Delaware hospitals in Christiana and Wilmington.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 8, 2016
DEAR ABBY: On a recent trip out of state, my husband became ill. The hotel we stayed in referred us to a nearby urgent care walk-in clinic. The nurse took his blood pressure, which was very high. The "doctor" never took his temperature or mentioned the high blood pressure to us. He prescribed six drugs and we went on our way. My husband was happy; I was not. When we returned home, I looked up the doctor's name on the internet. Actually, he was a physician's assistant, not a medical doctor.
NEWS
July 2, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Each year, Philadelphia University receives about 2,500 applications for its graduate program in physician assistant studies - and 20 percent of those applications typically come from New Jersey. Most have to be turned away. The private university based in East Falls has only 50 spots a year and keeps half of them for students who have come through its undergraduate program. That's despite predictions by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics that physician assistants - who diagnose and treat patients under the supervision of a physician - will be the second-fastest-growing profession in the next decade, as more people get health insurance under the Affordable Care Act. On Tuesday, the university is to unveil a partnership that crosses state boundaries, spans the public/private sector, and is aimed at filling that demand, particularly in underserved urban areas such as Atlantic City, Camden, and Trenton.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2010 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sue Shirato is a nurse. And a doctor. But probably not the kind of doctor you think, which makes her introduction to patients at the Jefferson Heart Institute more complicated. "I'm Dr. Shirato, but feel free to call me Sue," she tells patients. "I am Dr. Duffy's advanced-practice nurse. " Shirato, a nurse practitioner, just got her doctor of nursing practice degree at Thomas Jefferson University. Most nurse practitioners still have master's degrees, but nursing schools want the DNP to be the entry-level degree for advanced-practice nurses by 2015.
NEWS
February 5, 2008
Expand the role of physician assistants I applaud The Inquirer for sharing the positive aspects of Gov. Rendell's Rx for Pennsylvania and urging action on this bill from the legislature ("Out in the cold," Jan. 28). The key item in this debate is health care access for all Pennsylvanians at less cost. Covering the uninsured will lessen costs for the insured, businesses and hospitals. How best to do this? The governor has expanded the roles of physician assistants and nurse practitioners, initiated patient safety measures to have hospitals become more responsible, and provided incentives for small businesses to join in this effort.
NEWS
June 23, 2002 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Walter R. Bateman, an insurance executive who is active in the community, recently was named president of the North Penn United Way. Bateman of Solebury was elected to the position at the organization's recent annual meeting. Bateman had been a member of the organization's board since 1993 and served as chairman of the 1996 United Way campaign. "I'm honored to have been chosen to take on this expanded role with this outstanding organization," said Bateman, chief executive officer of Harleysville Insurance.
LIVING
October 25, 1999 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Physician-assisted suicide continues to be a controversial issue in America. Assisted suicide is legal in one state - Oregon - and a bill currently in Congress would override that law. Oregon voters in 1997 passed the Death With Dignity Act. Oregon residents who are terminally ill, mentally competent adults and have received approval from two physicians, can get a lethal dose of a prescription drug. They may take that overdose, if they wish, and end their lives. No physicians, family members or friends are allowed to help.
SPORTS
June 4, 1999 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Pat Felker and a handful of her 10 children will attend tonight's Hero Bowl at Sun Valley, hawking programs and selling tickets. "I feel it's the least we can do," Felker said. Tim and Eric Felker won't be there, although they wish they could join their mom and siblings to help promote a cause that paved the way for their education and careers as physician assistants. "We have to go to D.C. for a conference," said Eric, who works with Tim for a group that supplies physician assistants to Delaware hospitals in Christiana and Wilmington.
NEWS
June 10, 1997 | By Lea Sitton Stanley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ken Harbert slipped into the confusing sadness of a buddy's funeral and came up with something that made sense. Here was a guy who had pulled Harbert out of a firefight in Vietnam, gotten through two years of the war, then killed himself several years later. The two men had served together as Navy hospital corpsmen, tending the wounded in the field in Vietnam. The year was 1975, and Harbert had just become a physician assistant (PA), a person who practices medicine under a doctor's supervision.
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