CollectionsPhysicians
IN THE NEWS

Physicians

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 23, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patrick M. Growney, 80, of Villanova, a Main Line hematologist who helped start the Bryn Mawr Medical Specialists Association and who supported the creation of the Main Line Health system, died Sunday, Dec. 8, of a heart attack at home. Board-certified in internal medicine, hematology, and medical oncology, Dr. Growney devoted his career to treating patients with blood and lymphatic diseases. Those included aplastic anemia, multiple myeloma, leukemia, lymphoma, and other forms of cancer.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Slack Inc., the Gloucester County publisher of 40 or so health-related journals, thinks it's time doctors have a lifestyle magazine of their own - a "CliffsNotes" or "how-to" on shopping, wine selection, travel, and relationships. There are about 800,000 doctors in the United States, and Slack, one of the nation's largest independent medical publishers, expects to reach 341,000 of them with the controlled circulation of Physicians' Life, the name of the new publication. The magazine will be free to the doctors whom Slack targets from a database of physicians.
NEWS
June 30, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the physician's checklist, somewhere between describing how difficult an operation was and which steps a family might want to take next, expressions of empathy may now become more prevalent. Again making its way through the Pennsylvania legislature is a bill - "benevolent-gesture" legislation - that would prohibit empathetic statements such as apologies and condolences from being used against medical personnel in court. The measure, which passed unanimously in the state Senate Tuesday and the House Judiciary Committee Friday, has advanced farther than previous efforts.
NEWS
October 19, 2003 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leonel Toledo spent the last three months caring for children in a small mining town in the high desert country of southwest Wyoming, where people are scarce, deer and antelope are plentiful, and the nearest big city is 2 1/2 hours away. Next month, the pediatrician will be in one of Philadelphia's poor urban neighborhoods, working at Temple University Children's Medical Center on North Broad Street. But the dramatic change of scenery is part of the routine for Toledo, 30, who grew up in Cinnaminson, Burlington County.
NEWS
July 26, 2015 | By Evi Heilbrunn, For The Inquirer
Few physicians can claim as many "firsts" as Nathan Mossell. In 1882, Mossell became the first African American to receive a medical diploma from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Not long after, the Philadelphia County Medical Society inducted him as its first black member. And in his most significant contribution to his field, Mossell in 1895 founded Frederick Douglass Memorial Hospital and Nursing Training School, the first hospital for black patients in Philadelphia, and only the second such facility in the nation.
NEWS
May 12, 1989
The views expressed in a Commentary Page column published Thursday by Lois Snyder were her own, and not those of her employer, the American College of Physicians.
NEWS
October 29, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward J. Resnick, 86, of Bala Cynwyd, an orthopedic surgeon and former director of the Pain Control Center at Temple University, died of complications from heart disease Tuesday, Oct. 25, at Temple University Hospital. Dr. Resnick founded the center and operated it from 1975 to 1991, his son, Bernard, said. On summer visits sponsored by Care/Medico from 1973 to 1984 and Orthopedics Overseas from 1984 to 1990, Dr. Resnick taught physicians in Kenya and Tunisia as well as in Peru and the Dominican Republic.
NEWS
January 31, 2003 | By Mark L. Baum and Markus Whitley
Our practice, Booth Radiology Associates, supports the New Jersey physicians' work slowdown that is planned for Monday to call attention to the urgency of the state's medical malpractice crisis. The technologists and physicians at Booth Radiology will perform and interpret only urgent imaging exams on Monday. Our Woodbury, Washington Township and West Deptford offices will not perform routine exams. Walk-in patients will not be accepted unless their referring doctors deem the studies are urgent.
NEWS
February 5, 2012
Founded in 1787, the College of Physicians of Philadelphia is one of the nation's oldest medical societies. John Redman was one of its founding members and its first president. Redman was born in Philadelphia in 1722 and was educated locally at William Tennant's Log College, a seminary in Bucks County. He completed his later studies in medicine at Edinburgh University and worked for a time in Europe. Returning to Philadelphia about 1748, Redman soon became a well-known and respected physician.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT WOULD NOT have been surprising to find Dr. Milton A. Wohl, a distinguished physician, repairing a tractor on his farm in Schwenksville, putting in a crop of corn, cutting down a tree or working a piece of wood in his shop. Dr. Wohl was a prominent orthopedic surgeon, former president of the Philadelphia County Medical Society, and a highly regarded teacher. But he was also a farmer, a handyman who could take anything mechanical apart and fix it, a historian, music lover, fisherman and world traveler.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 26, 2015 | By Evi Heilbrunn, For The Inquirer
Few physicians can claim as many "firsts" as Nathan Mossell. In 1882, Mossell became the first African American to receive a medical diploma from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Not long after, the Philadelphia County Medical Society inducted him as its first black member. And in his most significant contribution to his field, Mossell in 1895 founded Frederick Douglass Memorial Hospital and Nursing Training School, the first hospital for black patients in Philadelphia, and only the second such facility in the nation.
NEWS
July 2, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sidney R. Weiss, 94, of Voorhees, a family doctor who made house calls and took care of his patients from birth to old age, died Monday, June 29, at home of complications from kidney failure. He began his practice in Camden in the 1950s and later worked at practices in Pennsauken and Voorhees, specializing in family medicine and geriatrics. He retired in 2001. "He never said no to his patients. He was always accessible," said son Richard, also a physician. Richard Weiss, who followed his father's footsteps in family medicine, joined his father's Pennsauken practice in 1983.
NEWS
June 22, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wilbur Wilson Oaks Jr., 86, of Gladwyne, a renowned physician at Hahnemann University Hospital, died Saturday, June 13, of an intracerebral hemorrhage at home. As a doctor, an alumnus of Lafayette College, and a husband, father, grandfather, and great-grandfather, he approached every aspect of his life with enthusiasm, optimism, generosity, and humility. He made time for everyone. Growing up in Bala Cynwyd, Dr. Oaks, known as "Billy" or "Oaksie," loved playing sports. Turning a slight build to his advantage, he honed his speed, scrappiness, and good-natured competitive spirit into effectiveness on the basketball court and soccer field.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Julie Kayzerman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Trina Lisko has always taken to athletics. Growing up, she tagged along with her two older brothers to play soccer until the sun set, and made sure to try everything from street hockey to water sports. But the former Bishop Eustace Prep field hockey star and alumna of Duke University, where she captained the hockey team in her senior year, did not want her athletic career to end with school. Now 37, the mother of two young children, and a physician specializing in sports medicine, the Collingswood resident recently gravitated to Parkour, an obstacle-course training regime.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For more than a century, medical education in the United States has meant learning how to practice medicine and how to do research to make medicine better. But that could be changing. Given the need for more primary-care physicians, the shortage of certain specialists, and the belief that medical schools boost local economies, 36 institutions have opened across the country in the last 20 years. That growth "has been accompanied by a shift toward new medical-education models where research plays a minimal role," according to a paper published recently in Science Translational Medicine.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
George J. Horner, 91, of Newtown Square, a retired physician, musician, and a Holocaust survivor, died of a subdural hematoma Thursday, April 23, at Bryn Mawr Hospital. In 1942, Dr. Horner and his family were sent to the Terezin concentration camp northwest of Prague, Czechoslovakia. Skilled on the piano and accordion, he played at the camp to provide some relief for those imprisoned there. Music helped him through the years of World War II and later, to bear the news that the Nazis had killed three family members.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chester J. Minarcik Jr. wanted to be a Presbyterian minister and a physician. "He wanted to be passionate about both," said son Drew. "But he felt it would be harder to take time off from a medical career" to pursue his ministerial studies. So he graduated first from a seminary and then from a medical school. "He was tremendously giving of himself," his son said. On Friday, April 24, Dr. Minarcik, 68, of Moorestown, director of Child Neurology Services of Southern New Jersey there since 1992, died of a heart infection at home.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT WOULD NOT have been surprising to find Dr. Milton A. Wohl, a distinguished physician, repairing a tractor on his farm in Schwenksville, putting in a crop of corn, cutting down a tree or working a piece of wood in his shop. Dr. Wohl was a prominent orthopedic surgeon, former president of the Philadelphia County Medical Society, and a highly regarded teacher. But he was also a farmer, a handyman who could take anything mechanical apart and fix it, a historian, music lover, fisherman and world traveler.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Slack Inc., the Gloucester County publisher of 40 or so health-related journals, thinks it's time doctors have a lifestyle magazine of their own - a "CliffsNotes" or "how-to" on shopping, wine selection, travel, and relationships. There are about 800,000 doctors in the United States, and Slack, one of the nation's largest independent medical publishers, expects to reach 341,000 of them with the controlled circulation of Physicians' Life, the name of the new publication. The magazine will be free to the doctors whom Slack targets from a database of physicians.
NEWS
February 16, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Can a modified vegan diet - heavy on tofu, whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, and low on saturated and trans fats - significantly help with heart disease? It's a question that Robert Fischer, head of the division of infectious diseases at Einstein Medical Center, considered last October, after his second coronary event in 61/2 years. On the surface, Fischer, 65, of Elkins Park, appears to be an unlikely candidate for heart disease. He exhibits none of the usual risk factors.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|