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NEWS
August 28, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Earlier this summer, the Pennsylvania Senate passed a bill that would allow nurse practitioners to practice to the full extent of their license, removing a requirement that they have "collaborative agreements" with physicians - a form of oversight. Supporters say that the measure, which next goes to the House, would improve access to cost-effective care by allowing nurse-practitioners independently to take on more tasks, including prescription-writing. Opponents maintain that physicians, who undergo more training, should keep providing supervision.
NEWS
December 23, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patrick M. Growney, 80, of Villanova, a Main Line hematologist who helped start the Bryn Mawr Medical Specialists Association and who supported the creation of the Main Line Health system, died Sunday, Dec. 8, of a heart attack at home. Board-certified in internal medicine, hematology, and medical oncology, Dr. Growney devoted his career to treating patients with blood and lymphatic diseases. Those included aplastic anemia, multiple myeloma, leukemia, lymphoma, and other forms of cancer.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Slack Inc., the Gloucester County publisher of 40 or so health-related journals, thinks it's time doctors have a lifestyle magazine of their own - a "CliffsNotes" or "how-to" on shopping, wine selection, travel, and relationships. There are about 800,000 doctors in the United States, and Slack, one of the nation's largest independent medical publishers, expects to reach 341,000 of them with the controlled circulation of Physicians' Life, the name of the new publication. The magazine will be free to the doctors whom Slack targets from a database of physicians.
NEWS
February 28, 2016
'Vaginal seeding" - the practice of swabbing down babies born by Caesarean with vaginal bacteria - sounds good in practice: Studies have shown babies born by surgical methods have different microbiomes, or bacterial colonies living on and in their bodies, than those born "naturally. " And because it seems increasingly clear that certain microbes have a surprising influence on infant health and development, it's no surprise new parents want reassurance their kids haven't gotten the short end of the microbial stick.
NEWS
June 30, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the physician's checklist, somewhere between describing how difficult an operation was and which steps a family might want to take next, expressions of empathy may now become more prevalent. Again making its way through the Pennsylvania legislature is a bill - "benevolent-gesture" legislation - that would prohibit empathetic statements such as apologies and condolences from being used against medical personnel in court. The measure, which passed unanimously in the state Senate Tuesday and the House Judiciary Committee Friday, has advanced farther than previous efforts.
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Scott Shapiro treats patients with clogged arteries, heart failure, and other classic cardiovascular diseases that strike millions of adults. Yet over the next year, the cardiologist says, he will spend dozens of hours cramming to learn intricate details about other conditions that he does not treat in his Abington practice, such as rare congenital heart defects. He and other leaders of the Pennsylvania Medical Society are part of heated national debate over how to ensure that physicians maintain their skills.
NEWS
December 14, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Though most current and former military personnel use civilian health care, many medical offices aren't prepared for the needs of veterans, soldiers, and their families. The National Board of Medical Examiners in Philadelphia and members of the White House's Joining Forces initiative are working to fix that problem, starting with the next generation of physicians. The 17-member task force recently held several days of meetings here to decide what was most important for doctors to learn about military-related medical issues.
NEWS
October 19, 2003 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leonel Toledo spent the last three months caring for children in a small mining town in the high desert country of southwest Wyoming, where people are scarce, deer and antelope are plentiful, and the nearest big city is 2 1/2 hours away. Next month, the pediatrician will be in one of Philadelphia's poor urban neighborhoods, working at Temple University Children's Medical Center on North Broad Street. But the dramatic change of scenery is part of the routine for Toledo, 30, who grew up in Cinnaminson, Burlington County.
NEWS
July 26, 2015 | By Evi Heilbrunn, For The Inquirer
Few physicians can claim as many "firsts" as Nathan Mossell. In 1882, Mossell became the first African American to receive a medical diploma from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Not long after, the Philadelphia County Medical Society inducted him as its first black member. And in his most significant contribution to his field, Mossell in 1895 founded Frederick Douglass Memorial Hospital and Nursing Training School, the first hospital for black patients in Philadelphia, and only the second such facility in the nation.
NEWS
June 13, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
For the parents of Jameson Finley, there was one thing more alarming than when he coughed up branch-shaped chunks of a substance with the consistency of string cheese. The thought of what would happen if he did not cough them up. The boy, then 5, suffered from a condition called plastic bronchitis, which can lead to asphyxiation, pneumonia, and death. It can strike children who have undergone certain complex heart surgeries, as Jameson had, and it occurs on rare occasions in noncardiac patients - some of whom go years before getting the correct diagnosis.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 31, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Nathan Brillman, 93, formerly of Wyncote, a decorated World War II veteran and a physician in Northeast Philadelphia for three decades, died Wednesday, Aug. 24, of congestive heart failure at Rydal Park in Jenkintown. Dr. Brillman grew up in Strawberry Mansion with a passion for baseball. He told of playing on the ballfields at 33rd and Dauphin Streets. In the late 1930s, he was a member of a team in the city-sponsored baseball league that took the City of Philadelphia's championship title for 16-year-olds and younger.
NEWS
August 28, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Earlier this summer, the Pennsylvania Senate passed a bill that would allow nurse practitioners to practice to the full extent of their license, removing a requirement that they have "collaborative agreements" with physicians - a form of oversight. Supporters say that the measure, which next goes to the House, would improve access to cost-effective care by allowing nurse-practitioners independently to take on more tasks, including prescription-writing. Opponents maintain that physicians, who undergo more training, should keep providing supervision.
NEWS
August 25, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Quentin M. Giorgio, 64, of Newtown Square, a physician who cared for others despite his own medical issues, died Tuesday, Aug. 9, of peritonitis at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Giorgio was diagnosed with testicular cancer at age 21. In the 1970s, cancer treatments were not narrowly targeted as they are now; Dr. Giorgio received aggressive full-body radiation and chemotherapy to combat the cancer, his family said. As a result, he was plagued with complications, especially in the last 10 years, his family said.
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Dr. Theodore Rodman didn't happen upon his patients only in the medical school and hospital at Temple University. "Once in a while," his former administrative assistant Kathy Clark Kelley said, "he liked to go around the corner from the hospital" for a roast beef sandwich. "More than once, he brought back a sickly guy," she said, "probably a ditch digger or construction worker. " The guy was "maybe wheezing, maybe coughing," and Dr. Rodman "provided him with the care that he needed, free of charge, no chart, no questions asked.
NEWS
June 26, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, STAFF WRITER
Elementary school teacher Leslie Isaacs says it's easy for her to see how her students are doing as young health journalists. "They have this light from within because they want to help the world," said Isaacs, whose students at Highland Park in Upper Darby have been part of the Healthy NewsWorks student journalism program for several years. Now the College of Physicians of Philadelphia has added its own kudos, giving Healthy NewsWorks the 2016 Organizational Public Health Recognition Award.
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Scott Shapiro treats patients with clogged arteries, heart failure, and other classic cardiovascular diseases that strike millions of adults. Yet over the next year, the cardiologist says, he will spend dozens of hours cramming to learn intricate details about other conditions that he does not treat in his Abington practice, such as rare congenital heart defects. He and other leaders of the Pennsylvania Medical Society are part of heated national debate over how to ensure that physicians maintain their skills.
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Jonathan T. Grabe was completing his fourth year of residency in neurology this month at Barnes Jewish Hospital in St. Louis. He was to begin a fellowship in neuromuscular disorders at nearby Washington University. But on Sunday, June 19, Dr. Grabe, 30, who grew up in Westmont, was found dead in the bathroom of his St. Louis apartment. "There was nothing conclusive to suggest what the cause was," said his father, Thomas. "He called home Thursday night" and spoke to a brother, his father said, "and he seemed great.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2016
The American College of Physicians has appointed Darilyn V. Moyer executive vice president and chief executive officer, effective Sept. 6. Moyer is professor of medicine, executive vice chair for education in the department of medicine, internal-medicine residency program director, and assistant dean for graduate medical education at Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University. Moyer will be the first female EVP and CEO in the 101-year history of the American College of Physicians, a Philadelphia-based medical specialty organization.
NEWS
June 13, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
For the parents of Jameson Finley, there was one thing more alarming than when he coughed up branch-shaped chunks of a substance with the consistency of string cheese. The thought of what would happen if he did not cough them up. The boy, then 5, suffered from a condition called plastic bronchitis, which can lead to asphyxiation, pneumonia, and death. It can strike children who have undergone certain complex heart surgeries, as Jameson had, and it occurs on rare occasions in noncardiac patients - some of whom go years before getting the correct diagnosis.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Salix Pharmaceuticals has agreed to a $54 million settlement of a whistleblower lawsuit alleging that it paid speaking fees and provided lavish entertainment to physicians who prescribed its gastroenterology drugs. The charges were initially brought in lawsuits filed by two Philadelphia-area firms, McEldrew Young and Joseph Trautwein & Associates. The Justice Department, which announced the settlement Thursday, conducted an investigation and later filed its own complaint under the False Claims Act. "Drug and medical-device companies have paid billions of dollars to doctors as speakers, researchers, and consultants," said Eric L. Young, a partner at McEldrew Young.
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