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BUSINESS
May 25, 1986 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
For decades, hospital administrators and physicians have viewed one another with suspicion while battling over issues ranging from the cost of medicine to the control of their facilities. But recently, as both groups have faced unprecedented challenges to their economic well-being from the government, insurers and employers, the two groups have begun forming alliances in ways that were unthinkable only a few years ago. For physicians, this change may be taking place not a moment too soon.
NEWS
September 13, 2012 | By Bill Toland, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
In his speech to the Democratic convention last week, Bill Clinton eventually turned to President Obama's signature domestic achievement, the 2010 Affordable Care Act, which expands Medicaid coverage to millions of newly eligible patients. That's the good news, if you are poor and lack health care. The bad news is this: If you're a Pennsylvanian who is newly enrolled in the state's Medicaid health-insurance program for the poor, only 2 out of 3 physicians in the state are willing to see you, new research shows.
NEWS
December 6, 2011
By Peter Sananman, Hallam Gugelmann, and Jeanmarie Perrone 'I need Percocet, Doc," the man said. He reported that he had fallen off a ladder the day before while cleaning gutters. His request for that particular narcotic pain medication may not have raised suspicion if not for an astute clerk who recognized him. The clerk retrieved records showing the man had gone to the same emergency room four times over the past six months for alleged falls off a ladder. There's no telling how many other emergency rooms he had been to across the city.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tandigm Health, an Independence Blue Cross joint venture designed to help manage the practices of primary-care doctors in the Philadelphia area, has signed contracts with nearly 270 physicians, it will announce Tuesday. IBC and its 50-50 partner, Davita HealthCare Partners Inc., launched Philadelphia-based Tandigm in April as a provider of services to doctors to improve care and cut costs. Under the Tandigm model, IBC will turn over a percentage of health-insurance premiums to Tandigm, which will then assume responsibility for the cost and quality of all care for the patients seen by a founding group of physicians.
NEWS
February 28, 2003
'Smart' voters got two McGreeveys for the price of one The smartest people in New Jersey were the people who voted for Gov. McGreevey. They were so smart, they got two governors for the price of one. Remember the Jim who said emphatically that he would not raise taxes? Then there is the Jim who says the president made him raise taxes. Remember the Jim who said he would hire only qualified people? Each day we find in screaming headlines something painful and far removed from that promise.
NEWS
June 1, 2011
Doctors sometimes do dumb things. Like ordering antibiotics that are certain to be ineffective. Or prescribing expensive brand-name drugs when cheaper generics would do. Actions like these are routine in much of primary care. They run up costs while offering no benefit to patients. They can sometimes even cause harm. A first step toward controlling health-care costs could be to alert doctors to their wasteful ways. Armed with knowledge, physicians might adopt more efficient patterns of practice.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1995 | By Cynthia Mayer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The medical group that says it handles 15 percent or more of all baby deliveries in Philadelphia wants to sign up 60 percent of the area's obstetricians and gynecologists in an effort to bargain with HMOs. Vanguard HealthCare Group Inc. has created a subsidiary, Omnia Inc., to establish a network of some 750 physicians in New Jersey and the five-county Philadelphia area. Omnia would provide comprehensive services to about 100,000 women in return for a fixed fee paid by HMOs. The Omnia venture is one of many being formed around the country in what health specialists describe as a kind of collectivization of physicians.
NEWS
May 27, 2012 | Freelance
Cas­par Wis­tar was once one of the pre­mier physicians in Phila­del­phia. Born in the city in 1761, Wis­tar was the son of Richard and Sa­rah Wyatt Wis­tar, a Quak­er fam­i­ly. As a teen­ag­er, Wis­tar assisted the wound­ed from the Bat­tle of Germantown in 1777, and this ex­pe­ri­ence re­port­ed­ly inspired him to go into med­i­cine. He studied at the University of Penn­syl­van­ia and the University of Edin­burgh, Scot­land, and received his doc­tor­ate in 1786.
NEWS
October 29, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward J. Resnick, 86, of Bala Cynwyd, an orthopedic surgeon and former director of the Pain Control Center at Temple University, died of complications from heart disease Tuesday, Oct. 25, at Temple University Hospital. Dr. Resnick founded the center and operated it from 1975 to 1991, his son, Bernard, said. On summer visits sponsored by Care/Medico from 1973 to 1984 and Orthopedics Overseas from 1984 to 1990, Dr. Resnick taught physicians in Kenya and Tunisia as well as in Peru and the Dominican Republic.
NEWS
April 13, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Pennsylvania's new natural gas law, which takes effect Saturday, was being debated, the focus was on high-profile issues such as the new impact fee. But just before it passed, medical provisions were added that now have some physicians worried it will compromise public health. Except in an emergency, a physician who needs proprietary information about chemicals used in natural gas drilling to assess a patient must provide "a written statement" to a company, according to the act, and must sign a confidentiality agreement.
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