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Physicians

NEWS
December 6, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jay Spiegelman, 92, formerly of Elkins Park, a retired physician and allergy specialist who shared pollen count information with Philadelphia-area hay-fever sufferers, died of kidney failure Tuesday at the Manor at Oakridge in Harrisburg. Dr. Spiegelman graduated from Germantown High School. He earned bachelor's and medical degrees from Temple University, and interned at Mount Sinai Hospital in Philadelphia. During World War II, he served in the Army Air Force in the United States and Canada.
NEWS
June 18, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the 1970s, Dr. Mary Hansen would learn ahead of time what soap opera fans across the nation would have hungered to know — what was up next on All My Children and One Life to Live. "She was a close personal friend of Agnes Nixon," the Main Line creator and script writer of both daytime shows, Dr. Hansen's daughter, Barbara Carper, said. "Agnes would send her the scripts and she would read through them and verify their medical accuracy. " It was not a staff position, but, Carper said, "it was a fun thing, fun for me to brag about it. " Her mother "was very quiet, very reserved," Carper said.
NEWS
January 29, 2010 | By Steve Hallock
As floodwaters ravaged an Illinois town a few years ago, a newspaper reporter covering the story heard somebody shouting from a porch, asking him to pull a dog out of the torrent. The journalist put his notepad in his pocket, waded into the current, grabbed the flailing dog, and delivered it to its grateful family. The journalist, a former student in my media ethics course, later told me that colleagues who had seen him pull the dog from the flood had chided him for putting aside his journalistic ethics of independence and objectivity to participate in a story he was covering.
NEWS
July 2, 1992 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Thomas M. Bosley, a physician who resides in Villanova, was recently promoted to attending surgeon on the neuro-ophthalmology service at Wills Eye Hospital. Bosley received his undergraduate degree from Yale University and his medical degree from Stanford University. He served a neurology residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and a research fellowship in neurochemistry at the Institute of Neurology in London. A clinical fellowship at Wills in the neuro-ophthalmology service followed, which was combined with a research fellowship in the department of neurology at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
July 19, 1992 | By Charlie Frush, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you should dent your skull one day, you might find the president of the Burlington County Medical Society stitching you up. That's because Mark J. Meredith - that's Dr. Meredith - likes his work at Memorial Hospital of Burlington County, Mount Holly, where he is assistant director of emergency medical services. Meredith, 41, of Chatsworth, was chosen in May to head the physicians in the county and is serving the standard one-year term. He enjoys the emergency setting, he said, "because of the diversity in what we see. " "Every day is different.
NEWS
June 20, 2001 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Lewis L. Coriell, a scientist and physician whose contributions greatly aided the development of the Salk polio vaccine, died yesterday on his 90th birthday at Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center in Camden. Dr. Coriell, a Medford resident, was found to have cancer three months ago. He was also a virologist, a pediatrician and president emeritus of the Coriell Institute for Medical Research in Camden. He established the institute and contributed to modern biomedical research worldwide.
LIVING
July 13, 2000 | By Robert Strauss, FOR THE INQUIRER
Tammy Ader has this lasting memory of her short time living in Philadelphia about 10 years ago: "I marveled at a city like this where the working-class people and the rich people lived right on top of each other," she said. "I don't think there is any other place like that. It really struck me how they at once rubbed up against each other and then also got along when they had to. " Philadelphia, then, is the inspiration and also the setting for Ader's first on-her-own series, Strong Medicine, which premieres July 23 at 9 p.m. on Lifetime.
NEWS
June 22, 2013 | By Summer Ballentine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite a painful past marked by time in Nazi labor and concentration camps, relatives said, Peter Siegler's warm and humorous personality never hardened. Dr. Siegler, 89, of Haverford, died Wednesday, June 5, of heart disease at his Naples, Fla., townhouse. The Hungarian native's first impression of America came in 1945, when he was starving and sick after spending about six months in a concentration camp in Austria during his 20s. He was liberated by soldiers, and when he asked for a smoke, a GI handed him not just one cigarette but a pack of Camels.
NEWS
October 14, 2014 | By Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Nicholas K. Gonatas, 84, Philadelphia pathologist, researcher and founder of the Division of Neuropathology at the University of Pennsylvania died of pancreatic cancer Tuesday, Oct. 7. Born March 15, 1930, Dr. Gonatas was raised in Thessaloniki, Greece, capital of the province of Macedonia. His son Dinos recalls stories his father told about living through the Nazi occupation of Greece between 1941 and 1944, including leaving home to live on the island of Euboea. "And they had no electricity.
NEWS
July 16, 2008 | By Karen Langley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert A. Rodgers Jr., 83, of Lafayette Hill, an obstetrician-gynecologist and World War II pilot, died of a cerebral hemorrhage Friday at Abington Memorial Hospital. Born in East Liverpool, Ohio, Dr. Rodgers entered the Army Air Corps in 1943 right after graduating from high school. He trained on the just-developed B-29 long-range bomber and flew 10 missions from Guam, including the last U.S. mission over Japan. As his crew returned to base, it was announced that President Harry Truman had received Japan's official surrender, said Dr. Rodgers' wife, Paula.
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