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NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Swashbuckling warriors and deceitful deities. A six-headed monster and a witch who turns men into pigs. It is gripping stuff, these tales attributed to the poet Homer, yet no one is entirely sure when the works were written. Now comes an answer from a New Jersey physician who found his muse in an unconventional place: the realm of statistics. Eric L. Altschuler joined with biologists to study the words of ancient Greek as if they were genes, evolving and changing over time. By analyzing a set of 173 common words in modern Greek, Homeric Greek, and an older language called Hittite, the scholars concluded that The Iliad and The Odyssey were written down in the mid-eighth century B.C. "It's like a time machine," said Altschuler, an associate professor at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey.
NEWS
March 2, 2013
John C. Esposito, 86, a physician in Springfield, Delaware County, for more than 50 years, died Monday, Feb. 18, of cancer at his winter home in Cape Coral, Fla. A son of Italian immigrants, Dr. Esposito grew up in South Philadelphia. His parents, Charles and Anna, impressed on him the importance of a sound education. After graduating from South Philadelphia High School for Boys and Temple University, he received his medical degree from Georgetown University School of Medicine.
NEWS
February 7, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard A. Weinberg, 80, of Upper Providence, a dermatologist who practiced in Delaware County for more than 40 years and had a passion for photography, died Sunday, Feb. 3, of cancer at his home. Dr. Weinberg, who opened a medical office on Sproul Road in Springfield in 1964, incorporated his love of photography in his practice. The walls of his waiting room were filled with his photographs. Specializing in nature photography, Dr. Weinberg enjoyed capturing the beauty of the outdoors and often spent hours taking photos at Tyler Arboretum in Media and Ridley Creek State Park in Upper Providence.
NEWS
November 14, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
RUSHVILLE, Ill. - Patients line up early outside his office just off the town square, waiting quietly for the doctor to arrive, as he has done for nearly 60 years. Dr. Russell Dohner is, after all, a man of routine, a steady force to be counted on in uncertain times. His office has no fax machines or computers. Medical records are kept on handwritten index cards, stuffed into row upon row of filing cabinets. The only thing that has changed really - other than the quickness of the doctor's step or the color of his thinning hair - is his fee. When Dohner started practicing medicine in Rushville in 1955, he charged the going rate around town for an office visit: $2. Now, it is $5. This in an era when the cost of health care has steadily risen, when those who don't have medical insurance often forgo seeing a doctor.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2012
* THE MOB DOCTOR. 9 p.m. Mondays, Fox 29. WHEN I WAS growing up, the white coats most TV doctors wore might as well have been white hats. If not quite gods, they were at least dedicated crusaders who could be trusted to put patient care before anything else, including their personal lives. And those personal lives didn't seem to require much effort. Because they were (mostly) men. And handsome. And doctors. Who wouldn't want to go out with them? But you don't have to be old enough to remember "Marcus Welby, M.D. " - much less those '60s icons "Dr. Kildare" or "Ben Casey" - to have noticed that today's TV doctors are decidedly more human.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ernest A. Tremblay, 86, of Glen Mills, a family physician, died Saturday, Oct. 13, of complications from cancer at Riddle Memorial Hospital in Media, where he had been on the staff for almost 50 years. Dr. Tremblay admitted the first patient to the emergency room when Riddle opened in 1963. He also delivered the first baby, his wife, Christine, said. He was still treating patients as a member of a family practice at Riddle until he became ill in January, she said. "Medicine was his passion.
NEWS
September 13, 2012 | By Bill Toland, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
In his speech to the Democratic convention last week, Bill Clinton eventually turned to President Obama's signature domestic achievement, the 2010 Affordable Care Act, which expands Medicaid coverage to millions of newly eligible patients. That's the good news, if you are poor and lack health care. The bad news is this: If you're a Pennsylvanian who is newly enrolled in the state's Medicaid health-insurance program for the poor, only 2 out of 3 physicians in the state are willing to see you, new research shows.
NEWS
August 14, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Christopher J. Conners, 51, an attending physician in diagnostic radiology at Lankenau Hospital from June 1992 to March 2001, drowned Tuesday, July 3, in a boating accident off the Danish island of Mon. Since 2009, he had been an attending physician in teleradiology service for NightHawk Radiology Services, with headquarters in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. Dr. Conners worked for the firm most recently from its offices in Sydney, Australia, and Zurich, Switzerland, his sister, Anne, said.
NEWS
August 11, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
David J. McAleer, 92, who retired in 2002 after a 46-year medical practice in Delaware County, died Monday, Aug. 6, of heart failure at his home in Hershey's Mill, a retirement community in West Goshen. Dr. McAleer was a surgeon at what is now Mercy Catholic Medical Center in Darby from 1956 to 2002 and at Riddle Memorial Hospital near Media from 1962 while maintaining a practice in Upper Darby, then in Havertown and Drexel Hill. He was president of the medical staff at Mercy in 1985-86 and, in the same term, chairman of its medical board.
NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Every August, a new class of future physicians gathers to put on the starched jackets that transform them from 22-year-old idealists to healers in training. These "white-coat ceremonies" are inspiring affairs. This year's events also broke news, since students are embarking on a career that's changing in real time. Thanks to the Affordable Care Act (assuming it survives the presidential election), these would-be doctors will study gross anatomy as well as cost containment. They'll keep records electronically, a snap for a generation raised on texting.
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