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NEWS
October 19, 2015 | By David Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bertram Greenspun, 81, a physical-rehabilitation physician and lifelong Philadelphian, died Wednesday, Oct. 7, after a long fight with frontotemporal degeneration. Born in 1933, Dr. Greenspun grew up in North Philadelphia's Feltonville neighborhood and graduated from Central High School. Throughout his life Dr. Greenspun remained connected to his alma maters, organizing Clara Barton Elementary School reunions into his 70s. During a temporary retirement he spent his time volunteering in Central's archives.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Norbert L. Silpe, 87, of Voorhees, a physician for the Camden city public schools from 1956 through 1999, died of heart failure Tuesday, Oct. 13, at Virtua Marlton Hospital. Born in Lorain, Ohio, Dr. Silpe earned a bachelor's at Temple University in 1951 and graduated in 1955 from what is now Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. Dr. Silpe maintained a private medical practice in Maple Shade through the same period in which he worked with the Camden City School District, a son, Richard, said.
NEWS
October 12, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elaine Catherine Pierson Mastroianni, 89, of Bryn Mawr, a physician and the author of Sex Is Never an Emergency , a sexual-health guide for young adults, died Saturday, Oct. 3, of lung cancer at home. Dr. Pierson's slim paperback appeared on campuses a decade before Dr. Ruth Westheimer suggested a frank approach to human sexuality, and three years before Our Bodies, Ourselves , a landmark book on sex, was released. "My primary objective of this little book is to prevent unwanted pregnancies and, secondarily, to help students be more comfortable with their level of sexuality, whatever that level is," she wrote.
NEWS
July 26, 2015 | By Evi Heilbrunn, For The Inquirer
Few physicians can claim as many "firsts" as Nathan Mossell. In 1882, Mossell became the first African American to receive a medical diploma from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Not long after, the Philadelphia County Medical Society inducted him as its first black member. And in his most significant contribution to his field, Mossell in 1895 founded Frederick Douglass Memorial Hospital and Nursing Training School, the first hospital for black patients in Philadelphia, and only the second such facility in the nation.
NEWS
July 2, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sidney R. Weiss, 94, of Voorhees, a family doctor who made house calls and took care of his patients from birth to old age, died Monday, June 29, at home of complications from kidney failure. He began his practice in Camden in the 1950s and later worked at practices in Pennsauken and Voorhees, specializing in family medicine and geriatrics. He retired in 2001. "He never said no to his patients. He was always accessible," said son Richard, also a physician. Richard Weiss, who followed his father's footsteps in family medicine, joined his father's Pennsauken practice in 1983.
NEWS
June 22, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wilbur Wilson Oaks Jr., 86, of Gladwyne, a renowned physician at Hahnemann University Hospital, died Saturday, June 13, of an intracerebral hemorrhage at home. As a doctor, an alumnus of Lafayette College, and a husband, father, grandfather, and great-grandfather, he approached every aspect of his life with enthusiasm, optimism, generosity, and humility. He made time for everyone. Growing up in Bala Cynwyd, Dr. Oaks, known as "Billy" or "Oaksie," loved playing sports. Turning a slight build to his advantage, he honed his speed, scrappiness, and good-natured competitive spirit into effectiveness on the basketball court and soccer field.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Julie Kayzerman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Trina Lisko has always taken to athletics. Growing up, she tagged along with her two older brothers to play soccer until the sun set, and made sure to try everything from street hockey to water sports. But the former Bishop Eustace Prep field hockey star and alumna of Duke University, where she captained the hockey team in her senior year, did not want her athletic career to end with school. Now 37, the mother of two young children, and a physician specializing in sports medicine, the Collingswood resident recently gravitated to Parkour, an obstacle-course training regime.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For more than a century, medical education in the United States has meant learning how to practice medicine and how to do research to make medicine better. But that could be changing. Given the need for more primary-care physicians, the shortage of certain specialists, and the belief that medical schools boost local economies, 36 institutions have opened across the country in the last 20 years. That growth "has been accompanied by a shift toward new medical-education models where research plays a minimal role," according to a paper published recently in Science Translational Medicine.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
George J. Horner, 91, of Newtown Square, a retired physician, musician, and a Holocaust survivor, died of a subdural hematoma Thursday, April 23, at Bryn Mawr Hospital. In 1942, Dr. Horner and his family were sent to the Terezin concentration camp northwest of Prague, Czechoslovakia. Skilled on the piano and accordion, he played at the camp to provide some relief for those imprisoned there. Music helped him through the years of World War II and later, to bear the news that the Nazis had killed three family members.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chester J. Minarcik Jr. wanted to be a Presbyterian minister and a physician. "He wanted to be passionate about both," said son Drew. "But he felt it would be harder to take time off from a medical career" to pursue his ministerial studies. So he graduated first from a seminary and then from a medical school. "He was tremendously giving of himself," his son said. On Friday, April 24, Dr. Minarcik, 68, of Moorestown, director of Child Neurology Services of Southern New Jersey there since 1992, died of a heart infection at home.
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