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BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Independence Blue Cross and DaVita HealthCare Partners Inc. on Tuesday announced a new company that would provide services to primary-care physicians in Southeastern Pennsylvania, in another of IBC's efforts to improve care and cut costs. Terms of the deal were not released. The goal of the 50-50 joint venture, called Tandigm Health and based in Philadelphia, is to sign up 300 doctors by the time it starts operating Jan. 1, said Anthony Coletta, an IBC executive who was named president and chief executive of Tandigm.
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard J. Dlutowski, 79, of Northeast Philadelphia, a family physician affectionately known as "Dr. D.," died Tuesday, March 25, of complications from cancer at his home. Dr. Dlutowski was a general practitioner in Torresdale for more than 40 years, sometimes caring for as many as three generations of the same family from offices at 9625 Frankford Ave. Early in his career, he made visits to the homes of patients, especially if they were neighbors, said his daughter, Janine Ehsani.
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Herman R. Raines, 89, of Wynnewood, a decorated World War II veteran who served as a combat medic in several historic battles before returning home to pursue a career in optometry, died Sunday, Dec. 22, at Lankenau Hospital after a brief illness. Dr. Raines rose to the rank of first lieutenant and assistant battalion aid surgeon in the U.S. Army and fought in many European conflicts, including in Normandy, France, and Rhineland, Germany. He was awarded the American Campaign Medal, the European, North African and Middle Eastern Medals with three battle stars, and the Bronze Star for remaining in position and saving lives while under intense fire, his family said.
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. J. Arthur Steitz, 98, a World War II veteran who became a physician with a passion for family medicine, died Sunday, Dec. 15, of natural causes at the Medford Leas retirement community in Burlington County. Dr. Steitz's 45-year career as a doctor included everything from house calls to emergency room medicine. Born in Philadelphia, Dr. Steitz earned degrees from Albright College and Jefferson Medical College. Following his service in the Eastern Flying Training Command of the Army Air Corp, he and his family returned to Burlington County, where his wife, Marion, grew up. In 1947, Dr. Steitz opened a family practice in Mount Holly, where he saw patients in the small community for $1.50 a visit and made house calls for $2 that included delivering babies, his family said.
NEWS
December 23, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patrick M. Growney, 80, of Villanova, a Main Line hematologist who helped start the Bryn Mawr Medical Specialists Association and who supported the creation of the Main Line Health system, died Sunday, Dec. 8, of a heart attack at home. Board-certified in internal medicine, hematology, and medical oncology, Dr. Growney devoted his career to treating patients with blood and lymphatic diseases. Those included aplastic anemia, multiple myeloma, leukemia, lymphoma, and other forms of cancer.
NEWS
December 21, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
N. Harry Gartzman, 94, of Philadelphia, a family physician who spent 23 years as chief physician for Camden schools, died Tuesday, Dec. 17, at Kennedy University Hospital-Cherry Hill. Music provided the theme to his life, with him asking for piano lessons at age 8 and playing at a saloon in Camden by 14. Graduating from Camden High School as valedictorian in 1937, Dr. Gartzman played parties to pay his tuition at the University of Pennsylvania, from which he received his bachelor's degree in 1941.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nicholas A. Kefalides, 86, of Merion, a physician, a groundbreaking scientist, and an educator, died Friday, Dec. 6, at his home from complications of pulmonary fibrosis. Dr. Kefalides was emeritus professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and remained active until his final days as a member of the medical school's admissions committee. In 1970, he began what would become a 43-year career at Penn and a high-profile role as a pioneer in the study of the extracellular matrix - components of the body that fill the space between structured cells.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Milton A. Batoff, 98, a career West Philadelphia family physician, died of kidney failure Saturday, Nov. 9, at his home on Long Beach Island, N.J., where he had resided since 1986. He was the uncle of the late William W. Batoff, the political fund-raiser who was Pennsylvania finance chairman for the 1980 reelection campaign of President Jimmy Carter. From his office on South 57th Street near Catharine Street, Dr. Batoff made house calls from 1946 until he retired in 1985, daughter Susan Carson said.
NEWS
October 12, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Walter P. Lomax Jr., 81, of Hilltown, a prominent physician, entrepreneur, and leader in Philadelphia's black community and beyond, died Thursday, Oct. 10, of complications from a stroke at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. The announcement came from his daughter Sara Lomax-Reese, president and general manager of WURD Radio, which Dr. Lomax purchased in 1993 to give an ongoing voice to black living history and culture. "It is with deep sorrow that we announce the passing of Dr. Walter Lomax," the statement said.
NEWS
October 11, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON & CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writers morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BACK IN February 1968, Dr. Walter P. Lomax Jr. had a distinguished patient. Martin Luther King Jr. was in Philadelphia to give a speech and he became ill. He arrived in Dr. Lomax's South Philadelphia office with an upper-respiratory infection. Nothing serious. "We took a picture together, and I asked him to write something for my kids," Lomax said in a 1983 interview in the Daily News. His message to the Lomax children was a simple one: "May you have a noble future. " For King, time was running out. Two months later, on April 4, 1968, he was assassinated in Memphis, Tenn., where he had gone to fight for the rights of garbage workers.
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